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grannyknot

Silver Soldering Jets

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I am going to try and teach myself triple DCOE tuning over the next year

or so. If I can learn how to get the carbs tuned 90% I'll be happy.

I'm paying $600 every time I take the car into the triples guru... so that has to stop!

If one man can do it, another man can do it.

 

Wondering if anyone can give me some insight on silver soldering jets?

I have just purchased a set of jet drills, metric and imperial along with a small hand drill.

Thanks,

Chris

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The soldered jets are test mules that will be used only to explore.  Once you find the sweet spots then buy real jets to match.

 

You only have to solder when you down size a hole. Clean the jet in vinegar then a small dab of flux then fine lead solder (silver is too hot). Try not to have too much flow on the nose where the jet seals against the carb body. The goal is to flow into the hole only. A butane or propane torch to warm the jet enough to flow the solder is all you need.

 

Buy a set of small holed jets to start with and drill up and pass through your desired hole size.

 

You should invest in a wideband too. It will "see" what is going on.

 

Practice  soldering and drilling using a big drill bit first  (1.5mm or more) so as not to easily break it (small ones are delicate) . You can also develop your technique too.  The guy in the video seems to solder with the drill in the hole then spins it out when the solder is cold. This could be interesting with non-solderable wire of various thickness's. 

 

Try using a pin vice too.

 

Good tips here: 

 

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I come from the world of motorcycles when it comes to carburetors so forgive the ignorance.  Why would you fill up a jet and redrill it instead of buying an assortment of jets? 

 

Also Capitan, thats pretty bad arse

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Because it's cheaper, and you can do it yourself in a matter of minutes without any special equipment.

 

Think of it as a prototyping / tuning exercise. Solder the jets closed, drill them out smaller than you think you'll need, and then work your way up from there by drilling them out larger, a little bit at a time, until you get the performance you desire. Then once you've got that size nailed down, buy (or make) real jets that are of the size you found works best.

 

I suspect motorcycle, "jet kits" are much more common than on cars, and certainly cheaper.

 

Or you could spent thousands of $$ on machining equipment and then spend a multitude hours of unpaid labor making your own....  :)

 

 

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This is the part that threw me off.  A selection of jets in a box which I referred to as a "jet kit"  for a motorcycle is under 100 bucks and generally universal.  You can pull out whatever the bike came stock with and go up or down several sizes.I found this on fleabay, its similar to what i use for bikes and listed to work with a DCOE 40

 

 

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A Z triple set need 6 emulsion tubes. They are ~$20 each with a $5 jet at the bottom and a $5 air corrector at the top.  There are probably 2000 or more combinations of the various sizes/types of each.  A mule set and drills will get you close for least investment.

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I am going to try and teach myself triple DCOE tuning over the next year

or so. If I can learn how to get the carbs tuned 90% I'll be happy.

I'm paying $600 every time I take the car into the triples guru... so that has to stop!

If one man can do it, another man can do it.

 

Wondering if anyone can give me some insight on silver soldering jets?

I have just purchased a set of jet drills, metric and imperial along with a small hand drill.

Thanks,

Chris

$600 bucks!! Damn..obviously I'm charging too little for Tuning carbs. I usually charge Lunch or Dinner for tuning Webers or Mikuni's..... Gonna have to up my prices from WhiteSpot  :P 

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quick 'n dirty - like it!

but i'm not so sure how accurately repeatable that method is for tuning...

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Slight caution here. I purchased a set of metric mini bits locally at KMS tools, came in an identical but orange case as granny's blue ones. According to my caliper, they are all about .03-.05mm smaller diameter than the advertised size on the box.... Maybe its my caliper, but it also was "confirmed" by comparing to a set of brand new 160 main jets that the 1.6 mm bit went right into with a quite a sloppy fit....

I guess the point here is, if your trying various jets in a tuning session, confirm the change in size from set to set via comparison to a known standard, don't think that going from a factory 160 to a you-drill 150 will actually be taking you down by .1 mm. You may be surprised at the result.

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Jim,

Thanks for that. I was wondering about the exactness of these sets and how to source them.

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Slight caution here. According to my caliper, they are all about .03-.05mm smaller diameter than the advertised size on the box....

 

Drill bits produce a hole larger in diameter than the bit itself. And the worse the drill is produced, the more poorly the two cutting lips mismatch, the larger the hole (within limits) it produces.

 

Those drills that measured undersize when static may actually produce the advertised correct size hole! Only real way to know for sure is to use the bit to drill a hole and then use pin gauges to check the hole size.

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or if you can get some accurate gauge wire that you can solder in and pull out. you might need to dress the top of the solder lightly to remove the lip/burr but you would def. get a better measurement than drilling. looks like your mini-bits use a hand twisted drill, which might be difficult to get a very straight, clean bore. these are all tiny nits we're picking, but it would suck to do all that work just to find out you were 1/2 a jet size off due to drilling inaccuracies...

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