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240ZBUILTBYME

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240ZBUILTBYME last won the day on September 18 2020

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About 240ZBUILTBYME

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    Active Member

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    Perth Australia

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
  • About my Cars
    early 1971 240z. Complete Rust Bucket

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  1. Thanks @Namerow Yes this is also my concern, the metal looks stretched from whatever impact it suffered or from the attempted repair to the area. my thoughts are attempting to use heat and shrinking the area along with stud welder and slide hammer work. My theory is if I shrink the curved area it will pull the kinked vertical section back into line somewhat. I also remember Kent replacing this area in his thread, I might trawl through his thread. I guess failing an attempted repair, replacement of the metal is always an option. Ryan
  2. Nope. Still a bloody legend Mike! Haha thanks for taking a further look though! How funny, it looked perfectly offset from your photos. so I think we can safely say that panel should be dead flat & vertical. Thanks again Ryan
  3. Thanks DKW. I quickly went through your thread and found these: yours appear from the photos to be dead straight up and down with no offset as Mike mentioned. On another note great work with the rust repairs! I plan to go through and read your thread properly when I get some time. I think I may reattach my bonnet hinge mechanism while I try to repair.
  4. Mike you’re a bloody legend mate! Could not have asked for better measurements/references! Thanks so much for going to all that effort! Ryan
  5. My plan is to work the panels in the following directions to bring back to square. I will then reinstall the front end to make sure everything fits. If anyone has done this repair before or has any tips I’m all ears!
  6. Just wondering if someone who has a untarnished original car can share the shape of the below area? I’m looking at building my rotisserie and feel I need to sort out the damage my car has before mounting the rotisserie to it. At some point it had a front end collision, most damage was on the RHS. Repairs to the area seem..... how do you put it....unprofessional, low rent, shithouse... in particular I need to know if the vertical panel that the front bumper mounts to should be perfectly straight up and down. As you will see mine kinks outwards where the bumper mount holes are. And I need
  7. Wow That is way too cool Mr X! no wonder you’re smarter than the average bear 🐻... that’s crazy the variation in length considering the tolerance of the build, is that due to differences in temperatures, metal expanding etc I would think the hangar where you build would be temperature controlled to mitigate that?
  8. Wow 😳 once you’re working at those sorts of tolerances you’re working in fractions/decimals anyway... do you build the frame/body or the engines? I imagine the slightest variation in building the body/frame would alter the aircraft during flight.
  9. Haha I’m not an engine guy so haven’t had to so far! I imagine you would have to move to fractions once working with engine component tolerances!
  10. Hahaha thanks mm is much more accurate and you don’t have to work with fractions! I had no intention to patch the piece I cut out, (though I may just to practice!) it was to get a better look at the condition of the underlying skins, so yes I was a little nonchalant in my cut. if you have read my thread, that whole panel is getting replaced, I have the rear quarter tabco panel already and outer wheel arch. I’m not too worried. that dogleg panel I cut had been repaired previously so it may look like I cut layers underneath but it was the original skin that had not been cut out.
  11. finally finished building the chassis jig after much toil. It was a journey in learning the basics of metal fabrication and has laid the ground works and basic skills I will need for my rust repairs. Pretty happy with the results considering I hadn’t touched a welder previously. Still much to learn though... As I will outline in the video I wanted to replace the backbone of the car, floors, chassis and frame rails prior to mounting on rotisserie for blasting. As you will see this will be impossible without extensive repairs to the rockers/doglegs and rears arches. So I have decided to get
  12. Just for the record. ordered and received these eBay SU screw sets. Excellent quality and perfect match for the old screws. If anyone needs new depression chamber or float cover screws don’t hesitate to buy these. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Datsun-240Z-Float-Bowl-Suction-Chamber-Carburetor-Screws-Set-/164620649300?_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49292 comparison with old screws, yellow zinc coating looks great thanks @Zup for finding them and sharing the link!
  13. Luckily my gaskets were only stuck to the insulators and not on the manifold. I imagine you have to be careful with a steel scraper on the aluminum surface and not to damage the flange face.
  14. Will do that! Will be the beeswax will hold up to the heat and fuel? Will do, I’ll have to buy a granite flat stone. there were minor Imperfections, I didn’t notice any significant warping I bought a set about a month ago X! Still waiting on them to arrive though...
  15. Minor update chassis jig is complete! Photos and video coming soon. I managed to free my carb insulator blocks from the intake manifold with a razor blade and cleaned them up. The gasket was pretty much glued to one of the blocks, attacked it with the razor blade and was careful not to inflict any damage. cleaned up further with paper towel and sugar soap. Came out pretty good! Question: are my blocks ok to reuse and do people normally recoat/varnish these blocks before reusing? If so what product would one use? ryan
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