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Measurement request and pic ?


Daluvian

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Posted (edited)

1973 240z Looking to see if someone could measure from the inside center of the spare wheel to the tail light panel center? Also a pic of the backside of the tail light panel like the ones in pic and underside it would be greatly appreciated! Looks like someone replaced the panel and not sure if the underside is supposed to be spot welded looks like a gap there everything lines up fine on outside debating if I should leave it or repair it. If anyone has any advice or experience let me know Thank you 

42E792ED-66DC-4B4C-8E63-4387DA689E21.jpeg

DBE1F6B5-1317-4502-8876-F82314A6E074.jpeg

B6F2920C-7DB8-416A-9A7B-9F29C8B3E870.jpeg

Edited by Daluvian
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Posted (edited)

Interesting.  It looks like there are holes in the replacement panel that line up with the inner U frame section.  Those holes appear to me to be there so you can "rosette" weld to the new panel to the frame.  In the third pic, I think I see evidence on the U frame section (goes horizontally from side to side on the car) of where the old welds were ground through to release the old panel.  The holes in the new panel appear to be too far away from the U frame.  

This is the original tail light panel on my 1971 240z.  You can see the rosette welds inside the indentation area (this area is obstructed from view when the bumper is on the car).  You can also two rosette welds where the panel attaches to the gas tank support "box" of the U frame.  The panel should be touching the bottom flange of the U frame support rail.  

 

IMG_20220108_180832.jpg

 

Here is a pic from inside.

inside-tail-panel.JPG


 

Edited by inline6
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There are some frame charts I've seen - take a search online and see if they give you the dimensions you need.  I can take some rough measurements if you need.  Just let me know.  However, I think the frame chart might be your best info.

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I have found that subframe metal is pretty stout. I believe I have pictures of that area in my build thread. I had to take the rear panel out and pull that exact area. A good frame machine is really the tight tool for that!

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Posted (edited)

 

This is in the back of my 71 Z. The fuel cell is where the spare tire well used to be, and is flush with the rear floor/top of the rear subframe structure.1BAAAC6C-4909-4D62-B337-7F92FA7256CB.jpeg

 

84FC46A6-A3EA-46BB-83E0-3BF5271B9AAD.jpeg

Edited by Racer X
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Posted (edited)

Thank you for those pics and info guys appreciate it. Just wondering if that’s opening a big can of worms. Maybe welding a plate in there to fill the gap and call it. My buddy at work has done replacement on one before and is pretty good at body gonna see what he says trading some work.

it was my dads car for 15 years. Happened to be a tow truck driver at the time and the car was towed and never got picked up got a killer deal on it. Someone put alot of time into it has a color change and they didn’t miss a spot on the paint, it’s a extremely high quality  paint  and for being my guess 20-25 years old it still looks amazing and a buff would bring it to near new finish problem is the door drains were clogged and it rusted out the bottoms and they need replacing, have the doors not sure on color match all painters are hacks now. I believe the whole car was been taken apart at some point and restored prolly in late 90s or early 2000s

Edited by Daluvian
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