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280z master fuse list?


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Question for you guys, is there a master fuse list for the s30s?  I found the below image that lists which fuses cover which electrical aspects of the car but only for a 280zx (below image).

My voltmeter fuse blew while driving today which apparently shares that circuit with the hazard switch, so I was curious if there was a list like the below for a 1978 280z that would list where else I should look for the short.

 

79fusesfull.png

Edited by chaseincats
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Well, it's laid out in the wiring diagram with more detail in the BE section of the FSM.

For the fuse that is for the voltmeter, you also have

  1. Brake Warning Lamp Check Relay
  2. Turn Signals (passing through the Hazard Switch)
  3. Seat Belt Warning Timer Unit
  4. Fuel Level Warning Lamp
  5. Backup Lamp Switch (Manual Transmission)
  6. Inhibitor Switch (Automatic Transmission)
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6 minutes ago, SteveJ said:

Well, it's laid out in the wiring diagram with more detail in the BE section of the FSM.

For the fuse that is for the voltmeter, you also have

  1. Brake Warning Lamp Check Relay
  2. Turn Signals (passing through the Hazard Switch)
  3. Seat Belt Warning Timer Unit
  4. Fuel Level Warning Lamp
  5. Backup Lamp Switch (Manual Transmission)
  6. Inhibitor Switch (Automatic Transmission)

I was looking in BE but didn't see a list just a bunch of wiring diagrams to follow.

It's weird that the turn signals would be affected by this because while the hazard switch doesnt work due to the fuse, the turn signals do...

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12 minutes ago, chaseincats said:

I was looking in BE but didn't see a list just a bunch of wiring diagrams to follow.

It's weird that the turn signals would be affected by this because while the hazard switch doesnt work due to the fuse, the turn signals do...

I didn't say there was a list. I said it is all laid out. The list I gave was from looking at the page in the BE section for the voltmeter and going back to the wiring diagram to identify all of the branch circuits.

The power for the hazard lights does not come off the same fuse as the voltmeter unless someone changed how your car is wired.

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I've not seen a master list like that.

And I agree... I think that would be a valuable tool. Kinda surprised someone hasn't put one of those together. Of course, it would be year specific.

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I took a look at the 78 wiring diagram, and the fuse that powers the voltmeter powers the following:

Hazard flasher
Steering lock switch (which then feeds the left hand door switch, which then feeds the door open warning chime)
Voltmeter needle

For 78, that's it. Just those three things.

So since I know that the top two fuses in the left hand column are for right hand and left hand headlights respectively, we have three of the fuses sussed out (for 77 and 78 at least) Someone else can take a couple fuses, and pretty soon, we'll have them all done!     LOL

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Yeah, it's always unnerving when a fuse blows. You put a new one in there and wonder how long it's going to be before it happens again.

So was the fuse that blew a new one? Or do you think it was from 78?  

The reason I ask is that if it was an old one from 78, I wouldn't' worry too much about it. In fact, I would replace all the fuses with new ones. Time probably hasn't been kind to them.

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4 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

Yeah, it's always unnerving when a fuse blows. You put a new one in there and wonder how long it's going to be before it happens again.

So was the fuse that blew a new one? Or do you think it was from 78?  

The reason I ask is that if it was an old one from 78, I wouldn't' worry too much about it. In fact, I would replace all the fuses with new ones. Time probably hasn't been kind to them.

I replaced all the fuses probably back in 2017.  So while its not decades old, it has been cooking in there for a while.

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Well let's hope tit was an infant failure on one of the 2017 fuses and not a real issue. You'll find out at the most inopportune time.

Do you have the spare fuse holders populated in your fuse box?

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2 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

Well let's hope tit was an infant failure on one of the 2017 fuses and not a real issue. You'll find out at the most inopportune time.

Do you have the spare fuse holders populated in your fuse box?

I wasn't aware there were spare fuse holders.  I usually just kept fuses loose in my center console.

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Ever notice those weird holes at the bottom of the fuse box?  :
P1070042.JPG

I think there might be an obscure mention of it in one of the FSMs.

That said... If you know you're blowing fuses, you might want to carry more than just three spares.  LOL

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I traced a couple more fuses. It's not pretty, but this is just what I have so far. I'm not going to bother making it pretty until it's been checked by other people.

This is for 77 and 78 (with differences between the years noted if there are any):

Fuse layout.jpg

Hopefully someone who is bored will check my work?

 

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58 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

I traced a couple more fuses. It's not pretty, but this is just what I have so far. I'm not going to bother making it pretty until it's been checked by other people.

This is for 77 and 78 (with differences between the years noted if there are any):

Fuse layout.jpg

Hopefully someone who is bored will check my work?

 

This will be invaluable for the community.  Weird that the voltage regulator would have a fuse. 

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That connection to the 77 voltage regulator is the "IG" terminal and I don't remember the details of that what that connection does.

I converted my 77 over to the 78 style internally regulated system a couple years ago, and as part of that conversion, I purged my brain of the finer details of exactly how the external voltage regulator works. I used to know, but now that I don't need to know anymore... Most of it left.  LOL

So, having a 78, you don't really need to know either.

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I traced a couple more fuses. Note that this has not been checked by anyone else, but here's the latest. Also note this is for 77 and 78. I haven't looked into any years earlier than that:


Fuse layout.jpg

Edited by Captain Obvious
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Not pretty, but I'm hoping it's accurate. I'll give it some time to cure and then I might spend a little time making it look prettier. And if I get a chance, maybe I'll look at some 76 or earlier.

I don't know much about the 240's, but I believe everything 260 and 280 had both lighter and glove box lamps. Maybe your bulbs are just burned out?

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Forgot to ask. There are some things on that diagram that might not really make sense to some people...

Do you know what means when there is a fuse for "defogger switch" and a completely separate different fuse for "defogger relay"? Does that make sense?

 

 

(Just in case it didn't make sense) The "defogger switch" is the low current side. It energizes a relay (the "defogger relay"). The current going through that fuse does actually ever get to the defogger itself. The fuse feeding the defogger relay is the high current side and provides the current that actually flows through the defogger.

But the tricky part is... If EITHER of those fuses is burned out, the defogger won't work.

Does any of that make sense at all? LOL.

I also don't like "steering lock switch", but that came right from the documentation. That is the "will activate the beeper if the key is in the slot while the driver's door is open". But I ran out of room.  Haha!

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1 minute ago, Captain Obvious said:

Forgot to ask. There are some things on that diagram that might not really make sense to some people...

Do you know what means when there is a fuse for "defogger switch" and a completely separate different fuse for "defogger relay"? Does that make sense?

 

 

(Just in case it didn't make sense) The "defogger switch" is the low current side. It energizes a relay (the "defogger relay"). The current going through that fuse does actually ever get to the defogger itself. The fuse feeding the defogger relay is the high current side and provides the current that actually flows through the defogger.

But the tricky part is... If EITHER of those fuses is burned out, the defogger won't work.

Does any of that make sense at all? LOL.

I also don't like "steering lock switch", but that came right from the documentation. That is the "will activate the beeper if the key is in the slot while the driver's door is open". But I ran out of room.  Haha!

I was curious about that.  It's surprising to see how much current the defogger actually pulls from the system.

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I took a couple minutes and looked at the 76 wiring diagram. The fuse list I posted above will not work easily for 76. They really screwed with some things in 76. Enough that it makes me wonder if it's a documentation issue, or if the 76 car really matches the FSM.

Anyone with a 76 want to do some poking around to help the cause?

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Which wiring diagram are you using?

The 1976 Service Bulletin describes some changes from 1975.  Might be worth a browse.  And the eye-straining black and white diagram downloads with the 1976 FSM.  It's actually a very crisp copy, compared to some, still just all thin black lines.  I got mine from a different site though, not 100% on the CZCC version.

https://www.classiczcars.com/files/category/5-service-documents/

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The problem I'm having is in the documentation from the 76 FSM. Kinda goes like this:

Here's a snippet from the 76 FSM showing the fuse block layout. Note that it shows the turn signals (FLASHER) coming from the third fuse down. This makes great sense to me since every other year from 74 through 78 uses the third fuse down on the left column to power the turn signals:
76 from manuala.jpg

And here's a 76 cover I have here that confirms the accuracy of the pic in the manual:
76cover1.jpg

But then here's another snipped from the same FSM that details the turn signal circuit, and it uses a different fuse. According to this detail, the turn signals come from the FOURTH fuse down:
76 from manualb.jpg

And important to note that the wiring diagram agrees... According to the wiring diagram from the same FSM, the turn signals come from the FOURTH fuse down.

So which is correct..... The parts of the manual that say third fuse, or the parts of the manual that say fourth fuse?

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I sold my 76 otherwise I'd have an answer right now.  Should be able to pull the third and /or/then fourth fuses and see what happens.  I'm going to go with the BE-12 diagram is wrong.  The fuse box cover has a lot more expense invested in it.

Does 77 have the same issue?  I've never been sure if there is a "real" 77 FSM available on the internet.  The ones I have downloaded look like 76 FSM's.

Actually, I just opened one of my 77 FSM's and it shows publication in 1976.  Which makes sense for 77.  And it shows turn signals on fuse 3.  So, it looks like the "76" FSM might be wrong.

Page BE-10 from the 77 FSM.  That's one of the beauties of the old Z cars.  So many layers to peel.  It's not just a sports car.

image.png

 

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