78zcar_blue

Door Lock repair for S30's

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    Hello everyone,

    If you are like me and don't want to spend $100 per door lock I may have the solution, I ended up repairing mine with 3 holes and a pice of clothes hanger wire. Please see attahed photo of my repair, it works very well. If you need additional help please reply to this thread I will be happy to help you.

    Mark

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    Edited by 78zcar_blue

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    Now that's (don't take this the wrong way!) good old yankee ingenuity.

    Cheap, creative solution to a problem. Hope it lasts a good long while.

    Nice work!

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    Yes , ''Yankee'' as in ''Johnny Cheese'' as in ''Dutch '' , and I can say the certain generation of those are as ''thrifty'' as they come - politely said of course.:classic:

    To clarify post # 1 , if you have to buy another door lock, you can have it ''set'' to your existing keys , so you do not need a different key for that replacement lock.

    Edited by Unkle

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    Very Creative! I'd switch-out the coat hanger wire for hard music wire. It's far less likely to fatigue.

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    It works very well and you will not have to pay to have a new lock keyed to the existing locks if you were to buy a new door lock.
    ....if you have to buy another door lock, you can have it ''set'' to your existing keys.....
    Don't those two statements essentially mean the same thing or is it just me?.......

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    Hello sblake01, I edited my original message to make it more clear for others reading it for the first time. Since you notice my mistake in the very first post, Thanks

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    I didn't think it was a mistake. To me, 'keying to the existing locks' is the same thing as 'setting to your existing keys'. It's really not quite that expensive to do one lock if you just hand the key and lock to the locksmith. The last time I had that done it was about 20 bucks per lock.

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    ^ I ripped into him immediately , and he edited his original post.

    Now I look like the dum dum with a wierd reply to statements in the first post that are not there anymore . :) Boy, I looked good . Now not so much..:D

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    ^ I ripped into him immediately , and he edited his original post.

    Now I look like the dum dum with a wierd reply to statements in the first post that are not there anymore . :) Boy, I looked good . Now not so much..:D By the way, SteveJ is a great guy.:beer:

    It never hurts to quote the point you are addressing. That way it's almost impossible for someone to edit what they said that you're responding, too.

    Of course, quotes CAN be manipulated. LOL

    Edited by SteveJ

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    It never hurts to quote the point you are addressing. That way it's almost impossible for someone to edit what they said that you're responding, too. Steve J is a manipulator !

    Of course, quotes CAN be manipulated. LOL

    HEY ! Who is this guy Steve ? :laugh:

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    I'm curious about the ability to re-key Datsun door locks, especially 77-78 locks. At least the ones I have are assembled by crimping the chrome face plate over the tumbler when it slid in from the front. The only way to disassemble is to un-crimp the faceplate, and I don't know how you would do that without damaging it.

    Has anyone actually had their door locks re-keyed?

    Sam

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    "At least the ones I have are assembled by crimping the chrome face plate over the tumbler when it slid in from the front. The only way to disassemble is to un-crimp the faceplate, and I don't know how you would do that without damaging it." To quote part of Sam's reply , to which my reply is :

    There's a ''Gator'' tool used by locksmiths to remove most facecaps without damage , but I always used replacement caps that have 4 tabs . You crimp these tabs over to hold the whole assembly together , then you reinstall the door lock back into the door . I'm sure you can ask to purchase these at a reputable lock shop that still does automotive work. Most auto work is now a specialty done with code readers and programmers , not old school anymore.

    Edited by Unkle

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    My locksmith had new face-caps because they go bad sometimes, and the little door/spring breaks or falls out.

    Edited by TomoHawk

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    Has anyone actually had their door locks re-keyed?
    I took my one new lock to get keyed last summer as the locksmith said it would be no problem, but it turned out that it was a 240Z lock, not a 280Z lock (new oem 280Z locks are NLA from the dealer or car lock companies.) He wasn't even able to use the same pattern of notches in the 240Z key. So now I have three different keys for my car, but I can find them with my eyes closed, so I'm OK.

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    Mark, can you please describe what you did, and is it still working? If I can repair my 280Z locks, I'd be happy to reinstall them, and take the 240Z key off the keyring. :bunny:

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    Because the lock cylinders are made from soft metal there is a little shoulder that moves the leaver up and down and after time will shear off (these cars were never built to last this long, they are getting old like us) so this little piece of wire projects down into the lock cylinder about 3/32" of an inch, when the lock cylinder rotates, it than makes contact with the wire and acuates the lever, and yes mine still operate just fine. It will make the locks feel very solid and direct when you lock or unlock your doors.

    Hope this helps.

    If anyone would like for me to repair your locks with this fix I have come up with, I will if you send your locks to me, I would charge around $30.00 per set which would include return shipping cost (I need to check into the shipping cost), if anyone is interested.

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    I see. Somehow you got the wire between the little spring and the solid part? Why not just use a little pin or rivet in stead of the wire?

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    Hello TomoHawk,

    I used the wire because I figured anything else would probably snap off, the wire can resist the shear better because it can travel up the wire, just my thoughts.

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    My fix isn't so pretty, but works good. I was planning to drill and pin it, but discovered after drilling it that I located the hole 90 degrees offset. Doh! :stupid: So had to use the coat hanger wire. Hole size is 3/32". Just exactly the dia of my coat hanger. Not elegant, but it works! For now at any rate.

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    Please post up some more info on this modification. How far down in the lock does the coat hanger wire go? Is it sunk in to the notch that is above the spring? Any more details or pictures is greatly appreciated.

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    So I just bought my first Z (Yay!) and it had the same lock issue, along with a bunch of other ones.

    A slightly different solution worked for me, so I figured I'd share. Unfortunately, in all my excitement in getting it to work, I put everything back together before taking any pics, but will try to describe it best I can.

    My lock problem was as described in this and other threads. The lock cylinder looked exactly like the one pictured in this thread. I didn't have any metal wire which I would trust to retain its spring constant in the long run to make the "wire hanger" repair last. I did have some softer metal wire; one of those shiny steel types you see at hobby stores. So instead, I drilled a hole right in the location where the lock cylinder lever arm is worn down (where the metal used to be, but is now gone). Drilled straight in, perpendicular to the shaft, about 2mm deep. Then jammed a small length of wire into the whole and compressed it in there with pliers. Matched the drill bit and the wire size closely so the wire barely fit and, upon compression, the wire expanded in the hole and pretty much stayed there for good. Then file the excess wire down to resemble the original shape of the cylinder and done!

    If anyone wants more info, I can try to draw up some explanatory diagrams. (This probably makes a lot more sense to me than someone reading it)

    Hope this helps.

    • Like 1

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