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you're getting old if u remember....


zhead240

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I am 20, my dads truck has both the floor dimmer and the dash ignition. We have a drive in, and the sonic has juke boxes....

Yeah, but you're in Arkansas... Just Kidding (I'm in North Carolina, so I shouldn't talk).

One item that should be on the list is the good old 8 track player (either car mounted-externally to the dash) or the deluxe home stereo with quadraphonic sound.

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You are getting old if you remember the milkman coming with a horse drawn cart.

You are getting old if you remember using an Xray machine when trying on a new pair of shoes.

You are getting old if you remember the Doctor coming to the house.

You are getting old if you remember being able to buy a good used car for $50.00, with the plates on it already and insurance was only a suggestion.

You are getting old if you completed your schooling before there was any such thing as "fast food".

You are getting old if you were the first one on the block with a reverb unit in your car.

You are getting old if you had a telephone made out of wood.

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Okay -

1) 45 record players in car (tell me how they loaded)

2) milk w/ cream bubble at the top (I walked into folks' houses at 4am and put it in the refrigerators)

3) non-synco 1st gear

4) baja bugs

5) Eastern Airlines

6) South East Asia Games (all participants ended up losing)

7) 84s (before they were portable)

8) fax machines w/roller printers

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Butch wax was just that, a wax, for what we called a butch cut or flat-top. Brilcream (sp) was a grease for longer hair, hence a greaser, or pomade as in "Oh God Where Art Thou."

The 8 track was invented by Bill Lear (of Lear Jet fame) taken from the Muncie 4 track player with double the time of play. I still have over 100 8 tracks and still looking for a Lear for my Z.

We finally got dial tone on the phone in 64, before we had to tell the operator what number we wanted.

I remember helping grand-dad put a turn signal unit on his pick-up.

Cop cars had the gum ball machine on top.

Windsheild wipers were vaccum operated.

And those P.F. Flyers DID make me run faster.

Bonzi Lon

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Being born in 1950, there isn't anything mentioned yet that I wouldn't remember even if you factor in the age factor:) My grandfather owned Nash's and DeSoto's. My greatuncle drove a Hudson. My first car was a Rambler. My 64 Datsun pickup originally had a non synchro first gear. That trans was so bad the I wasn't really sure if it had synchros in any gear. I recall there only being 16 teams in Major League Baseball, 8 in each league, no divisions, no wild card, no interleague play, no designated hitter, no drugs (that we knew of). I was paid $1.00 per hr. on my first job at a Datsun dealership! (well, sort of: they sold Chrysler/Plymouth but had some sort of a Datsun frachise in 1966) They later became Pomona Valley Datsun. My next job was a vast improvememt at $1.72. I kept that one for almost 35 years. (wages did increase)

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You are getting old if you remember the milkman coming with a horse drawn cart.

You are getting old if you remember using an Xray machine when trying on a new pair of shoes.

You are getting old if you remember the Doctor coming to the house.

You are getting old if you remember being able to buy a good used car for $50.00, with the plates on it already and insurance was only a suggestion.

You are getting old if you completed your schooling before there was any such thing as "fast food".

You are getting old if you were the first one on the block with a reverb unit in your car.

You are getting old if you had a telephone made out of wood.

I remember the x rays at Mother Goose Shoes. And I was the first one on the block with a reverb. Ha ha. My second car had a foot activated starter the floor switch for Hi beams, and a rumble seat. How about car hops on roller skates at the Drive in. A car with a automatic trans was really rare. A heater in the car and radio were extras. LOL Gary

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Being born in 1950, there isn't anything mentioned yet that I wouldn't remember even if you factor in the age factor:) My grandfather owned Nash's and DeSoto's. My greatuncle drove a Hudson. My first car was a Rambler. My 64 Datsun pickup originally had a non synchro first gear. That trans was so bad the I wasn't really sure if it had synchros in any gear. I recall there only being 16 teams in Major League Baseball, 8 in each league, no divisions, no wild card, no interleague play, no designated hitter, no drugs (that we knew of). I was paid $1.00 per hr. on my first job at a Datsun dealership! (well, sort of: they sold Chrysler/Plymouth but had some sort of a Datsun frachise in 1966) They later became Pomona Valley Datsun. My next job was a vast improvememt at $1.72. I kept that one for almost 35 years. (wages did increase)

as kids we use to have sleep overs in pup tents. one of my friends parents had a rambler ( early 60's) that had fold down front bench seats. we thought it was neat for sleeping in.

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A wooden chassis? That's not that old really. There was a car built in the 60s and 70s, maybe even later than that, called the Marcos. I believe it was built in England. A really stylish car for it's time as I recall but the most amazing thing was that it has a wooden frame. Wiki it and I am sure you'll find some info as Wiki seems to have info on everything, whether it's right or wrong. I just remember seeing the car at an auto show either in the late 60s or early 70s.

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