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Warning dumb question ahead....


Spridal

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Sorry, I read somewhere that the L-6 Cylinder engine was under a licence that Prince got from Mercedes-Benz. The engines really look very similar. What's the truth about that story? I'm shure you know it, Alan!

Rolf

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If one were to take the L20, L24, L26 and L28 engines and line them up side-by-side, you will find that they are exactly the same size and except for a few minor differences, identical. You don't make a big engine small, you make a small engine big. And Nissan already had the L20 in the Skylines before the Z was made.

Hi Miles,

More than once I've tried on this forum to get across the point that Nissan's 'L-gata' engines were designed by Mr Hiroshi Iida and his team as a potential 'family' of variants. They called this the 'L-gata Module', and they deliberately designed-in the possibility of multiple variants of differing capacity by allowing for a basic block design with a deep skirt, the possibility of a long stroke length, and a wide bore pitch. The history of the Nissan L-series engine did not begin with the L16 of the 510-series Bluebird, and the six cylinder L-series engines did not begin when two extra cylinders were "added" to the L16 to make an L24. That is just advertising copy for one particular market.

The Nissan 'L-gata' was used in many models in Japan, and was not always confined to a 2-litre capacity. Many people seem to overlook this. I have a Japanese market car that was fitted from the factory with an L24..........

Sorry, I read somewhere that the L-6 Cylinder engine was under a licence that Prince got from Mercedes-Benz. The engines really look very similar. What's the truth about that story? I'm shure you know it, Alan!

Hi Rolf,

Hiroshi Iida and his team designed Nissan's 'L-gata' engine module during the 1964~1965 period, a full year before the merger with Prince. Iida himself has admitted to being "influenced" by what he saw on the Prince G7 engine, but he also says that he was "influenced" by what he saw on the Mercedes ( and other ) engines. I think that is an engineer being candid, and I don't think many engineers work in a vacuum.

I believe that Prince actually licensed some design details used on the G7 valvetrain from Mercedes, but Nissan did not. Since the Nissan engine design debuted before the merger with Prince, I think it is fair for us to assume that no data or designs passed from Prince to Nissan before the merger. Iida san himself says he considered Prince a worthy competitor, but that he and his team were directly competing in the market place with Toyota. It was the news that Toyota were working on a new SOHC straight six to be used on their mid-sized and full-sized sedans that prompted Nissan's decision to go for a new SOHC six themselves from 1963/4.

Cheers,

Alan T.

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That was a thorough bubble bursting. It's kind of tricky to find a romantic version of the origin of Z in all that and not being an engineer I like the Zero version better. Makes a better curb side yarn (Newfoundland speak for a story with elastic properties). :)

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Please!

Hi Will:

Sorry for the delay.. the Graham-Paige / Nissan Connection article is located at:

<a href=http://zhome.com/History/GrahamPaige/GrahamPaige.htm TARGET=NEW> The Z Car Home Page</a>

It is a large file comprised of 11 .jpg images, so it will take a while to load. I think you'll enjoy it.

regards,

Carl

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