Jump to content

IGNORED

Japanese characters on the glovebox liner


Recommended Posts

Hi there.

Both me and my friend have a genuine swiss-market 240Z.
As @HS30-H pointed out in the past, the three japanese katakana characters ス イ ス on the glove-box liner stand for "su-i-su" and mean these two cars where destined for the swiss market (suisse)

What i'm wondering now are the Characaters next to the "swiss" tag: I have some kind of "F" or "P" in a circle left of the swiss mark
P1080598-Kopie.jpg?ssl=1

My friend has a something like an "A" right of the swiss mark.
Senn-suisse-A.jpeg


Since it was written there for a certain purpose during assembly or after, i guess it has either to do something with the equipment variant (colours maybe?) or the destination too.
But google translate attempts didn't bringe to any usable solution.

Does anybody in here know more or have other ideas?

Thanks in Advance!

Edited by JDMjunkies.ch
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was a Japanese minor in college. They have 3 different writings
Hiragana
Katakana
Kanji
This is clearly Katakana which are not words in the traditional Japanese language (typically western words like “baseball”).

This is translates to “Switzerland” like stated above.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Av8ferg said:

I was a Japanese minor in college. They have 3 different writings
Hiragana
Katakana
Kanji
This is clearly Katakana which are not words in the traditional Japanese language (typically western words like “baseball”).

This is translates to “Switzerland” like stated above.

@Av8ferg Thanks for your input. I already knew that ス イ ス means "swiss", written in katakana. Which means the Car was made for the swiss market.
What i'm wondeirng about are the other two characters, once left to the ス イ ス and once right to the ス イ ス. First of all what the characters mean, and then the reason for what they wrote it t here...

Edited by JDMjunkies.ch
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, tamo3 said:

I'm Japanese. The first letter looks like "キ” pronounce "ki" in Katakana.

Thanks a lot. Meanwhile i figured out the one after the "swiss" tag in the second picture is a Katakana pronoundced "Ah" or something like that?

Not sure what the purpose of this all was, though...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well since this is a phonetic alphabet there is no telling what it means. I bet it has something to do with the production process for some identification purpose and no actual meaning.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As an additional information, i found this picture of an US-spec glovebox liner. which hahs the same "Ki" Katakana character written on it, but now country destinatino written on it.
So that additional c haracter has obviously nothing to do with the countrly the car was assigned for delivery. I guess it has something to do with the assembly procedure or equipment variant of the car...
USA-Spec-Ki-Character-2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The first character () appears to be "Hidari" which means "Left".
the second katakana character is "" which spells "to", the third one might be "ル" which spells "ru". so it all can be something like "Left Torru 22" or so, but maybe i'm completely wrong here...

But what i can say until now is that the additional "A" and "" (Ki) Characters seem to appear on both European and American glove boxes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be "左トルコ 2"

If "左トル 22"  Remove left 22 ...

 

no idea what this message is...

Edited by tamo3
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, tamo3 said:

It could be "左トルコ 2"

If "左トル 22"  Remove left 22 ...

no idea what this message is...

I've got an interesting input from a very knowledged man, who told me these characters where not very inconsistent and maybe just used by a group of assembly-line workers internally, or even a single person to make a note to himself during assembly, or for the next guy in the assembling process.
It also appears that the words are often "assembly line slang" and sometimes even abbreviations of actual words.

the Above "トルコ" is spelled To-Ru-Ko (or Do-ru-Ko). Google translates it to "turkey" (which makes no sense, but is funny after all).
But the input from said man was that it was actually slang abbreviation for "torque converter".
The car above beeing a left hand drive car for the US market it was probably originally an Automatic transmission car, so it all may make sense.

But you have to be careful. Compared to other written characters, these don't seem to follow any rules or any official procedure, so this all has to be taken with a pinch of salt.
The characters could basically mean anything the assembly line worker wanted to note there..

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Zpenman said:

Thanks everyone for the input. By the way, my car is an automatic. Curiosity is a good thing. 

so that all seems another prove to the トルコ = "torque converter" theory. thanks for the update!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.