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Real1

'73 Restoration

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Hi All,

New member here. To make a very long story, short...back in the late 80's I bought a '73 240Z from a college kid. I ran it up to about 130mph on a test run and blew the rings. I didn't really care because I was going to do a full mechanical restore anyway.

At the time I had a big farm in central MO. I bought a donor 240Z of the same yr. I put the donor engine in the original Z only to discover the block was cracked. At that point I decided to take the car to a local restoration shop. Farm was sold shortly after, fortunes lost and the car remained at the restoration place. I sent them money as I could. Father of the enterprise died, son took it over. In my favor, no one there gets in a hurry about anything.

I haven't called them in a decade or more and so I made the fateful call a few days ago. Turns out it was the dad's dying wish that I be reunited with the car someday. So....it's there......bodywork 97% done and almost ready to paint. At this point I'm gonna let him paint the car and then come get it.

So my big question is;he's taken the whole car apart to paint it. While I like a challenge, I'm not sure I can get the whole car assembled again without some sort of schematic so I know where everything is supposed to go. 

Is there such a thing??

 

Kevin

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Yeah thanks, I see it above in the stickies. Which reminded me that I have the original Factory Workshop Manual. I'm going to hunt for it now......

I also have a book on restoring the engine....not modifying, but restoring to factory specs. 

 

Kevin

 

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7 minutes ago, Real1 said:

Yeah thanks, I see it above in the stickies. Which reminded me that I have the original Factory Workshop Manual. I'm going to hunt for it now......

I also have a book on restoring the engine....not modifying, but restoring to factory specs. 

 

Kevin

 

Your post reminded me of this book.  It's what you really want.

https://www.amazon.com/Restore-Datsun-Z-Car-Humble-2002-01-10/dp/B01FIWZ3PG

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I'm pretty sure I have that one....depending on when it was in print. I bought everything like that I could find for it back in the day. All in deep sleep now.....I'll find them.

I have all the old books for an XKE Jag too, my first love.

 

The FSM I found in a bookstore for $3...lol. I had mechanically restored the Z car before I found out the block was cracked. I even remember working on the rear diff.

 

Kevin

Edited by Real1

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There are several really good build threads on the site that should have enough pictures to walk you through. Look at some of "motorman7"s  build threads

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I second Patcon's advice.  Motorman7 restored my '73 to pure stock condition and we took it to ZCON Branson last year.  Motorman's thread has lots of photos :

As you assemble, post here with questions, and the knowledgeable folk here are sure to help. Then take it to a ZCON and really find out what you did right and wrong!  🙂t

 

 

Edited by jayhawk
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Thanks for that! I'm looking forward to this project, however daunting it may be.

I'm almost 70 now, but unless I get dementia of some kind, I have a lifetime of using tools and processes to fix and restore things. It's not so much the 'how' with this car, as identifying from piles and boxes what is what and where they go.

It no longer an option for me to have a service or somebody else to finish this car....it's just gonna be me and friendly advice where I can find it. When I had a donor car is was soooooo much easier to see how the factory did things, but that ship has sailed. 

It has Webers on it and the original carbs I think still remain on the original engine....I'd have to look. But the Webers were fine and I was simpatico with them. I even had MSD ignition on it....although he can't find it at present.  I'm not committed to authenticity. In fact, when I had sports cars, I was more devoted to the end game than matching numbers. I just think in this instance, it would be easier for me to stay stock because of all the original literature out there. This car was plenty exciting and fun to drive before I blew the rings in the original engine. I'm not gonna drive in rallies, or show the car, or race it....I'm just gonna DRIVE it and I hope, a lot.

So right now it's back in mid-MO and I'm in southeastern-WA. The restorer is tasked with coming up with a $ amount to paint the car since it's about 95% prepped. After that, I go get it....but I'm not making the journey in winter.....done that, wore the T shirt. I have no reason to take chances like that anymore and the weather can change in less than a day during a journey like that. So....we're shooting for spring sometime. All I can say is that I hope he gives me a number I can live with.

 

Kevin

 

 

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Keeping it stock for assembly documentation is a good idea.  But not being Pure means you don't have to go find rare/expensive parts also.  (Ask me how I know...:-)  Like some of the "unique to the '73" throttle linkages and carb water circulation parts.   

Posting questions here will probably be your best bet.   You might want to consider attending next year's ZCON in Colorado Springs, where I'm sure there will be some pure stock or near stock '73s to check .  (I do not know about the 2020 ZCON, but at the 2019 ZCON in Branson , '73 240Zs took first and second place in the Stock category. )

Have fun and keep posting about your project on this thread!

(I bought my '73 in Mt Vernon, WA while I was in the Navy.   Photos are of a Fun Run sponsored by that Datsun dealer in 1974 over the North Cascades Highway.  Lots of great twisty roads in WA...)

 

 

 

1974 Fun Run over the North Cascade Highway.jpg

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