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TomoHawk

Key-in Switch Wire Repair

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    My key-in buzzer never seemed to work.  I thought I would look into it since I had the cover off.  One of the wires from the switch is fine, and I can connect it, but the other wire had a splice that just fell apart.  The wire that's left is too short to splice or even solder.  Can you get the entire lock with the key-in switch and wiring off without having to break the bolts off?  Do you even need those shear-bolts, or can you just  use normal bolts?

    thxZ

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    You don't "need" the shear bolts. They are a theft resistant device intended to make it difficult to disable the steering lock by taking the whole lock assy off the steering column. But honestly, I don't think any thief is going to mess around with it at all. One or two well placed hammer whacks on the top of the assy would probably crack the lock assy right off the column regardless of what screws were used to hold it on.

    Even if all the screws were traditional "normal" hardware, I don't think a thief in a hurry is going to take the time to remove them. Just crack the whole thing right off the column. Whack. Done.

    Unless there's some non-stock additional theft resistance stuff installed, I bet I could steal most Z cars "gone in 60 seconds". I've not tested the theory, but I'm confident. it would cost me a window (if the doors were locked), a steering column clamshell, and an ignition switch assy. With nothing more than a hammer. Less than 60 seconds. Gone.

    Let everyone think about that and take the necessary precautions.

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    I wanted the above to stand alone, but as to your other questions about the switch...

    You can get the key-in switch out of the rest of the assy without dismounting everything. The only tricky part is prying off the indicator ring that shows the key positions (LOCK - OFF - ACC, etc). If you can pry that off, you can pull the switch out and replace it without having to dig any deeper.

    Personally though, I'd just bite the bullet and pull the whole thing off the column and do it on the bench. It might be just as easy in the end.

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    It still sounds like a big job for me, since I only get a couple hours a week for personal things, ao I might have to leave it as-it-is until next Fall.  But at least I know it can be done.  I just with the (person) who fixed it last added another inch to that wire!  That one inch is what caused the wire to break off inside.

    I wonder what the threads on those screws are.  6mm? 

    Edited by TomoHawk

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    50 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

     

    Even if all the screws were traditional "normal" hardware, I don't think a thief in a hurry is going to take the time to remove them. Just crack the whole thing right off the column. Whack. Done.

     

    Clearly, we all need to on the lookout for "whack jobs"!  ROFL

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    I suppose I'll find out what the threads are when it comes off.  If it's 6mm, I have some nice stainless steel socket head screws.

    Are you going to suggest I get a new lock cylinder and switch as well?  Some DeOxit should take care of the switch.

    Edited by TomoHawk

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    Plus, without a steering wheel, it would be a bit difficult to "drive-it-like-you-stole-it."  I usually take out a certain part that disables the EFI as well.

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