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XYZ

Is it worth it?

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I have read this story somewhere before, i think someone else posted it or it has been relisted... someone will fill you in im sure.

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Yeah, we had a go on this one....

It's a decent enough car, but considering it is going to need a lot of work to even have it moving under it's own power, we all thought the price was a bit high.

But then, beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.....:ermm:

By the time you went through the mechanicals, new hoses and all the weatherstripping it probably needs plus a paint job, the car would end up a 15-20K investment. Not outrageous, but a lot if you want a car you would want to drive...:cross-eye

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Originally posted by XYZ

Found this on Ebay. What do ya'll think? Worth the money being asked? 12K for a car with less than 9000 miles on it?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2413271721&category=6187

See the thread Original 240Z For Sale. where there was a "spirited" discussion of the value of this car about a month ago. It's a long thread, but if you are interested in the car, you might want to read the whole thing .

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I just found this interesting article on Zhome regarding storage.. short term and long term...

The main question, here, seems to be how long can you go without starting a car before you begin to risk damaging it? And the answer is about 4 weeks. If you let your car sit longer than that without taking special precautions (outlined in 'Long Term Storage', below) you're courting disaster. The internals of your engine, transmission and rear end are bare metal surfaces which are highly susceptible to rust. In fact, they can cease operating effectively if they begin to get even a slight amount of surface rust. They are bathed in oil during normal operation and oil prevents rust. When the car sits, the oil drains off of some of these surfaces. Moisture is the key ingredient necessary for the rusting process and when the bare metal encounter moisture the result is... rust. The less moisture in the air, the less the tendency for rust to occur; dry weather in the southwest and colder temperatures in the northern climes help to ward off rust. High humidity accelerates it. Some so-called 'experts' advise people who don't drive their cars throughout the year to start them up periodically to circulate the fluids and, thus, keep the internal bare metal surfaces coated with oil. While this might seem reasonable, it is the automotive equivalent of the 'old wives tale'. It is exactly the WRONG thing to do. A car in short term storage needs to be driven at least once a month. It requires more than just getting the water temperature gauge off of the peg. The oil temperature should also be brought up to normal operating conditions - and this isn't possible if the car just sits in the garage - no matter how much you rev the engine. You need to take the car out for a drive for about 20 miles or a half an hour. When you go out to the garage to just warm the car up, what you're doing is raising the temperature inside the block - but the engine doesn't run long enough for the engine block to get entirely heated. As a result, when you shut the car off the difference in temperatures (hot inside but cold outside) causes condensation on the inside. Condensation is moisture - and moisture causes rust. A car sitting too long without being run also invites fuel in the carburetor and fuel pump to evaporate, leaving behind a gummy residue. Gaskets dry out are then prone to cracking and disintegrating... more things you don't want happening to your car's engine! So Dr. Hipo recommends a half hour of exercise once a month, every month. On the way back home you should stop off at the gas station and top the fuel tank off... because condensation can also form on the inside of a partially empty gas tank. The oil change interval isn't effected too much by inactivity. Moisture can be collected in motor oil and if it is, it reduces the oil's lubricating ability. Don't be pennywise and pound foolish thinking that you don't have to change oil just because you've only driven the car 250 miles in the past year. Under those condition, an oil change once a year is warranted (although changing the filter probably isn't - you can stretch that to every other year).

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Good thoughts it all makes sence. And I agree. What the hell am I going to do with my inbord v-8 ?? The best I can I guess. :classic:

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