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2-77zs

"Aircraft strippers" However

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    I read the thread on stripping the cars, and understand (i think) the pitfalls. However, I helped a friend paint his 914 and we only surfaced preped for a new paint job. It turned out great, except where we had sanded some portion to the original metal. The shininess bled through and you could see, not feel the difference. My car has a gazillion layers of paint, in some cases I I have sanded to bare metal, how do I cover these? Just priming will not work as I have a solid 1/16th of paint height diference. What system should I follow? This particular 280z has very little rust areas to repair.

    Also, the interior metal is in great (original) shape. I simply wish to clean the metal inside the car and install new carpet/ interior panels. No need for paint. What is a good rust inhibiting cleaning agent? Is such a beast available? The only rust I have found is exterior. :stupid:

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    Well, I'm hoping that my answer doesn't offend you, but apparently you need to review the basics of a paint job.

    The Main purpose of Primer is to provide a bond for the paint to the metal. It's secondary purpose is to fill slight irregularities in the surface with enough build up of material that it can be sanded down smooth. It's third purpose is to provide a uniform color background upon which the paint can be applied without having to resort to several coats.

    There will no doubt be others who will add / deny some of these items but in my experience this is what Primer does.

    Primer is kind of like a "glue" which adheres to the metal, and then allows paint to "soak" into it in order for the paint to stick on the metal. Paint as a rule, will NOT stick to metal without some form of primer. For that matter, paint will not stick to smooth / shiny surfaces. There ARE paints formulated for that, but usually not what you would use for a car's body.

    Primer also will not stick to smooth or shiny surfaces. Depending on the application, different types of primer are available.

    In preparing a blemish free car, all you would need to do is to etch the metal in order to provide some "teeth" for which the primer to adhere to. There are Self Etching primers out there for new metal, and this is generally what the manufacturer's use. Self Etching will NOT as a general rule, etch old paint.

    On a car that has been painted before, you need to "scuff" up the prior finish / metal in order to get the primer to adhere. This is where sanding comes in. If you have several layers of paint, or if you have chips, or if you have known uneven surfaces, now is the time to sand the panel in such a manner as to smooth the surface out.

    You can use a dual action random orbital sander commonly referred to as a D/A sander. This tool allows you to quickly smooth out a panel and to feather out chips and cracks.

    Once you have the panel smoothed out you then primer the WHOLE panel with primer. Choose a color that will allow you to apply your paint without having to use several coats of paint, in order to hide the primer itself. For Example, White Paint use Light Gray Primer. Black Paint use the good old Maroon / Dark Rust Red or find a Dark Gray. Generally lighter shades of paint require a light gray primer, darker the maroon or dark gray.

    If you are familiar with the whole process you could sand your whole panel and then just spot primer the exposed metal. Scuff off the "skin" and then paint.

    I hope that this helps you.

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    The metal etching information was helpful. I guess the larger concern I was attempting to express but seemed to have failed at is; in order for me to feather the low points evenly, it seems as though I will be sanding large portions to metal base.

    I suppose with some much needed guidance from the members, I'll find the right prep before painting.

    (car will not be ready for paint until early October).

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    When you sand the old paint job, if the metal is less than perfectly smooth it is a given that you will sand down to the metal in spots. The purpose of sanding LARGE areas when sanding a blemish is to feather (i.e. gradually slope) the chip / crack / blemish.

    Unless you are going for a Black Paint job afterwards, AND you've feathered out properly, the probability of picking out the "low" is slight. Remember, you WILL need to use primer, AT LEAST in the areas where you've cut to the metal.

    You don't need to sand the whole panel down to metal, just feather out the areas where you've cut to metal so that it isn't a STEP from the top of the paint to the bottom of the metal. Besides, if you have 1/16" or .0625" or thereabouts from the paint to the metal, then you could definitely stand some more sanding in order to fade the blemish.

    Hope this makes sense.

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    What color are you painting it?

    Always remember dark colors always always show more imperfections and bodywork! Light colors hide, esp. white.

    Ex: My good friend is restoring a '65 Beetle. He is an outstanding bodyguy. When he finished prepping the body you could not see any problems with the work, see or feel. However once it was shot with the British Racing Green this was another story. Car still looks great, but in the right light...

    Nate:cross-eye

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    I was thinking Pumpkin Orange, with Pea Green EKG Pinstripping down the sides!!!!

    LOL.....NOT... Porsche has a color called venecian blue, a light bluish gray. I like it alot, but I'm not settled on anything yet. I don't want to screw this car up in anyway, so patience will be my marker until I know I know, Ya know???

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    Very very nice color!!!

    I'm a big fan. Porsche always has nice colors, I also like Guards Red. That blue is truly an amazing color and would look great on a Z!

    Nate :cross-eye

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    Can someone suggest a really good paint removal chemical ?

    I need to remove some paint but would like to avoid poisoning me or the dogs.

    zdisease

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    I was told never to use chemicals to strip paint because it gets absorbed into the metal. It's one of those things that down the road will cause problems. I took a DA and 80 grit sand paper to strip mine. On parts where bondo is thick, use a flap disc and a grinder.

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    oh wait ummm my bad that trick can only be used on fords use the d/a sander works great everytime and on the areas that are hard to get a d/a sander with use a grinder with a soft wire brush then lightly sand it till its smooth

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