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Jb Weld!!!


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Out in west Texas a friend was at his mom's ranch that is WAY out in the middle of no where and is a rocky climb up to the place. He punched a hole in his oil pan of his golf and had a nice little 'knife cut' in it. We jacked it up and plugged the hole with bubblegum and then JB welded over it. It's been on there for about 7 years and around 80,000 miles from what I hear. Overall, it's good stuff, but not to be used in lue of 'real welding'

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In my opinion it is like duct tape and bailing wire, they all work in a pinch if nothing else is available, but don't expect too much out of any one or all of them.

Or look at it this way; if it is a non essential part, why repair it. If it is an essential part, why not repair it the best way possible or replace it?

Bonzi Lon

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This is awesome stuf AT NORMAL temperatures. If it is going to be exposed to any appreciable heat, it softens and its bond gets weaker.

I'd like to find out how you come to make this statement.

I first got introduced to it when I needed to repair the threaded flange on a model boat engine that had completely broken off. This is the flange that (one of two) that bolt the muffler/exhaust manifold unit to the side of the Cylinder. I was looking for something that WOULD take high heat (in the case of JB Weld, it states 500°F on the package itself) and be strong enough to accept threading.

I cleaned up the area, then DRILLED and TAPPED the JB and put the motor back into service. I can't tell you how many hours of use it's had since then....but it's still going strong. I don't know in actual numbers how hot it gets, but I know it's hot enough to melt and burn plastic.

Granted, I wouldn't use it in lieu of proper repair methods, but as far as most applications in the engine compartment (aside from direct contact with the exhaust header etc.) I would think it would function quite well.

So could you clarify where you got your information from?

E

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I used a small amount to patch a pinhole puncture in the fuel tank of a Buick I used to own. First I plugged the hole with soap, then patched it. That patch held for 3 years, then slowly started to leak. A quick clean and reapplication kept it sealed until the car was sold several years later.

The stuff is great!

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Quote:

Originally Posted by blueovalz

This is awesome stuf AT NORMAL temperatures. If it is going to be exposed to any appreciable heat, it softens and its bond gets weaker.

I'd like to find out how you come to make this statement.

I applied the JB to seal two welded tubes used for fuel transfer (more as a sealant around the weld than to bond one tube to the other). The JB was glass hard and well cured when I continued with the project by doing some light welding 12" down the tube. The JB area was warm (but not so warm that I couldn't firmly grasp the tube with my hand) and where I was holding it, I saw where my fingerprints were marring the surface of the JB material. Looking closer, I found I could stick my fingernail slightly into the material and actually pull the material away from the tube. 15 minutes before this, it was hard as a rock and there would have been no way I could have done this. After I let it cool (it was not real hot to begin with), it got hard again.

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I used a small amount to patch a pinhole puncture in the fuel tank of a Buick I used to own. First I plugged the hole with soap, then patched it. That patch held for 3 years, then slowly started to leak. A quick clean and reapplication kept it sealed until the car was sold several years later.

The stuff is great!

Woah! Deja Vu! I just used some to plug a pinhole in the fuel tank of my Buick! I tried all kinds of fuel tank repair kits and all failed within a day or so. Finally we got the JB Weld to do the job. Using soap to fill the hole was a good idea. Wish I had tried that a lot earlier. It may have helped with some of my other patches.

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After I reading these stories this is why I like to carry a bit of string, duct tape, zip ties, a small tube of super glue and JB weld in my emergency kit in my car ... add in a paper clip to the mix and Macgyver can build you a Z LOL

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if you can press your fingernail or put fingerprints into "cured" JB Weld, then it means that it still hasn't cured yet, probably because the mix wasn't mixed thoroughly, or the proportions were just a hair off. The temperature during cure can affect the cure harness too. I still have a few blobs on the bench that haven't completely hardened after many months, with different mix ratios; the one mixed up properly hardened as you would expect.

thx

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I've used this stuff to fix a carburetor on a lawnmower that was cracked and sucking air,

throwing off the mixture. been about five years and its still holding and doing its job.

i also used it on the valve cover of my jeep to fix a crack (not really big enough to matter,

but it still bothered me), but that is coming off, could have the mixture wrong or something.

overall its a good product, especially if your dealing with areas that have gas on them.

about the hardest thing is getting the mixture right, but its not to hard to figure out.

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thanks everyone. it wouldnt be a good idea to use on it floor boards huh? well this is what i did.

i bondoed the holes, they werent huge though, then i plan to weld some metal scrap on top of it? would jb weld do the job?

aha thanks

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You'd be better off using POR-15 and their Power-Mesh material to "make" the floor metal you need.

This is actually a very cheap way of doing the floor (as a stop gap vs proper sheet metal replacement).

I can't say the same about the Bondo though, especially on the floor with the backside exposed to the ground AND the grit that's it's sure to get hit with!

2¢

E

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You'd be better off using POR-15 and their Power-Mesh material to "make" the floor metal you need.

This is actually a very cheap way of doing the floor (as a stop gap vs proper sheet metal replacement).

I can't say the same about the Bondo though, especially on the floor with the backside exposed to the ground AND the grit that's it's sure to get hit with!

2¢

E

wait so this stuff, the fiber power mesh, all i would have to do is, place it over the whole and por15 it on top?

thanks

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I have used JB Weld for a lot of things that I thought were hopeless basket cases (in some cases with a young child asking "Daddy, please try!" I gave it a shot). I have had great results with the stuff. PLEASE be aware that where I buy the stuff (my local NAPA) there are two varieties of the stuff - Regular and Quick (might be spelled Kwik or something like that). The Quick Weld states a quicker curing time and a lower resistance to heat. I tried it once for something and it worked okay, but in my opinion I'd stick with the original formula for important repairs.

For the floorboard repair I'd stay away from bondo. Many folks say that bondo and moisture are a poor combination. The POR fix is likely the avenue I would take as a stop-gap approach. I think it'll also be best to get off as much of the rust as you can first. That'll leave you with larger pin holes, but lessen the chance of reoccurance.

Guess what, yep, I've got a Buick, and it's sporting JB Weld in a few spots.

It's funny, I came to the board to ask y'all your opinions for a repair job that I am considering JB for, and found this thread right on top! I'll start a separate thread for that one rather than hijack this one.

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I have used JB Weld for a lot of things that I thought were hopeless basket cases (in some cases with a young child asking "Daddy, please try!" I gave it a shot). I have had great results with the stuff. PLEASE be aware that where I buy the stuff (my local NAPA) there are two varieties of the stuff - Regular and Quick (might be spelled Kwik or something like that). The Quick Weld states a quicker curing time and a lower resistance to heat. I tried it once for something and it worked okay, but in my opinion I'd stick with the original formula for important repairs.

For the floorboard repair I'd stay away from bondo. Many folks say that bondo and moisture are a poor combination. The POR fix is likely the avenue I would take as a stop-gap approach. I think it'll also be best to get off as much of the rust as you can first. That'll leave you with larger pin holes, but lessen the chance of reoccurance.

Guess what, yep, I've got a Buick, and it's sporting JB Weld in a few spots.

It's funny, I came to the board to ask y'all your opinions for a repair job that I am considering JB for, and found this thread right on top! I'll start a separate thread for that one rather than hijack this one.

thanks. so i guess ima have to take out the bondo, and use the por stuff.

LOL.

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