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zwhore

so, i started to roller paint...

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what a pain in the arse.

i hate bubbles.

i did a first coat on the backside of the hood.

orange. i matched my franklin mimt 240 to sherman williams knockout orange.

i will post some second coat pics soon.

for know bubbles are like the soviets in in 1980, bad.

very bad.

more to follow in 12-24 hours.

thanks for shopping

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I don't know if you have done it, but make sure there are no oils or solvents on your painting surface. The differance between a surface treated with a good wax and grease remover and one that hasn't is crazy.

Let us know how the painting goes, lots of people have been interested in this process on this and other forums.

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i have rolled on some paint on my car (lower parts of the doors and sides of the car) and played around within the paint a bit on a spare door. my thoughts are doing a small area is a pain as its over to fast and hard to know the % of what ur mixing when its such a small amount, and that bubbles are bad, and it seemed that when it was thin enough to not need help popping the bubbles, it would run to easily.

i ended up not diluting the paint at all for the bits on my car and doing one coat, as i couldn't be bothered making the surface perfectally flat (as i was thinking this wouldn't get my car past a road worthy certificate but it did) so the orange peel hids it kinda of nicely. i used wattyl paint which i've since been told doesn't like chemicals much, but no problems so far :D i'm going to sand it back and do a nicer coat at some stage anyway, and would love to try doing a whole car just for the fun of it, but i think i'd get sick of sanding!

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update,

i finally got time to do a second coat on the underside of the hood.

i used a 40-45% mix of the sherman willams direct to metal paint with mineral spirits.

less bubbles, and it turned out fairly nice.

the first coat would scratch either, very durable.

the color i choose was knockout orange which my franklin mint 240, but is lighter once applied. still looks good though.

new pics are my album.

tony

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Very nice! I am impressed with the results. I guess I am only used to using paint rollers with the large nap on them for painting walls. Are you going to paint the entire car this way? Good Luck.

carl

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so, i did the 2nd coat on the fenders and cowl panel.

turned out pretty nice.

i think 4 coats should cover it perfectly.

before i do a 3rd coat i may do a light sanding with some 600 grit sandpaper just to help it stick better and perhaps make it more durable once it fully cures.

one thing i have noticed, when using the foam brushes, it goes on really thin. so iam going to mix upa differnt ratio of paint/spirits. maybe a 15% or even 10%.

one trick i have found out is to keep rollering the paint on. dont get more on the roller, just roller untill its almost tacky. really smoothes it out.

i will upload some pics soon. for some reason it wont let me load any right now.

more to come, i will start on the body this weekend.

tony

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ok, added more pics to my album.

did a 3rd coat on the fenders. i tried using a thicker mix of paint for the brush.

it covered well, but bubbled quite abit.

i think 5 coats on the exposed surfaces should be the right amount, but since orange is a light color i might need more.

stay tuned, another coat tonight or tomorrow, and a first coat on the outside of the hood.

as soon as the hood is done i can get the car in to my garage to start on it.

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The pics look great in your gallery. Thanks for documenting this for us. I think once I get a garage I will probably try the same.

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Alright, finally with a orange z the same as mine. I been working with the roller method. Except, I'm practicing with a rustoleum orange. Yours looks better. Mines more of a orange/red. I'm conviced this method works. Using thin coats ensures that each layer will dry completely before the next is to be applied, The coverage is not as good but it's the best way to achieve decent results with the least amount of problems. I've had no trouble with bubbles by keeping the mixture thin.

From the looks of the pictures the orange is a close match. What would you say, is it close to 918 orange?

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the orange matches my franklin mint 240.

but it looks alittle lighter than 918. but i should look like an orginal paint job from the 70's, just faded. so i dont mind.

besides, the flares and fender mirrors will make it look way better when its done.

i am still having some bubbles. i may have to wet sand it all and do another 2 coats then wet sand again.

it may be xmas before i get it done. damnit.

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Zwhore. Why do you call it the "franklin mint" 240? Could you give the particulars on the paint you got from Sherwin Williams. It looks like they maybe able to do a color match and custom tint the paint.

I agree about the shine. New BC/CC paint just seems to be too glossy for a car that originally wasn't anywhere near that level of gloss. Call it 'old school gloss'

I'm happy with this process. Since I know my body work and rust abatement isn't absolute perefect. I be able to make spot repairs. Also all paint work can be done without a paint booth. Expensive ventilation or the danger of breathing deadly fumes. And most all I don't have 3 grand for a paint job

Unless you've have used epoxy primer the car can rust beneath most primers and you won't know till a bubble in the paint shows up. I have a 74 260z that I put hundreds of hours into a paint job which in just a few years some cancer started too show thru at the wheel wells. That car stays in the garage all the time now.

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the franklin mint 1/24 scale 240z. they made an orange one a few years ago.

it was supposedly painted with origan datsun 918 orange paint.

they have a new one out now, but its white, http://www.franklinmint.com/product1.aspx?SID=2&Product_ID=8667

i have an enormus collection of z models, diecast of all sizes and tons of other stuff. what can i say, im a nerd.

even my senior pics in high school were with my purple 70 240.

as for the paint. its called direct to metal paint. they can match any color. its basically their brand of rustoleum. the orange was about 55 bucks for a gallon.

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ok, finally did the first coat on the outside of the hood. not one bubble. not sure why, but it looks great. did another coat on the cowl and fenders.

i have noticed the more paint is on the part, the smoother it gets each time.

new pics are in my album.

i hope to start on the airdam and headlight buckets tomorrow.

once the hood has 5 coats on it, i will start on the body.

tony

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Zwhore

The fender looks good. Did you do any wet sanding? I got a practice piece going and the paint really smoothes out easy. A few bubbles at first but they go away shortly. My prep was alittle sloppy but still it looks good after 3 coats. I going to wet sand with 400 to see how it does on the following coats

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dont sand with 400. use 600 or 800. finish with 100 or higher. then use polishing compond to bring it to a nice shine.

normally i prep with 400, then move up 200 grit incriments to 1200.

i sanded down some drips with 400 and it goes way to fast.

i havent sanded anything i have painted yet.

more soon i hope.

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Nice, very nice! Your results thus far are encouraging me to do the same. I must now think about what the color will be..... I was really in love with Arne's yellow.... I am partial to the red (the color of my first Z, a '72), or keep it what it was, white. Decisions, decisions. Must address some rust first, so there is no rush to decide.

John

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So far I've got about 5 coats on. I wet sanded my test area with 400 to get rid of some sand scratchs from my prep. Not bad looking for a quicky test. To do the whole car I going to start with a better prep job. But with only 5 coats, I can see a good and cheap paint job can easily be achieved.

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Went to Sherwin Williams a got a gallon of Industrial/ marine oil base industrial enamel "daredevil" orange (their color) which is really, really close to 918 orange from what I can tell. They made an attempt to scan my battery hatch door but could'nt get a good scan. 32 bucks for a gallon. Got home tried some test color samples a so far it's a close match. Finally, after all these years my project 240 will be one color again. I will post photos once I'm underway.

post-6475-14150798551062_thumb.jpg

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$32 A GALLON!? that is an inexpensive way to paint a car. I bought PPG paint for $600 a gallon (2 stage base coat-clear coat). I'm lucky that I have a paint booth to shoot it in though. There is an AWSOME auto body program that has everything, $20 for 4 months of class, including unlimited use of the spray booth:D . Good luck with your rolling

Matt-

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Considering the paint is applied with a roller, It's coming along quite nicely.

Has anyone tried warming the paint before applying it??? Whenever I've used Estapol Clear on a large flat surface, I've found that by leaving the can in the sun for an hour or so, the paint spreads easier and almost eliminates brush marks.

Rick.

:devious: :devious:

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The whole point of rolling on the paint is to get a decent looking paint job, without a booth, without the harmful, explosive fumes, without having the right experience and just so happens to be cheap. Currently, my car is about five different colors and has been parked in my garage for 7 years. I could not justify spending 3 grand to get it painted. This method will allow me to have it back on the road in a month. It's not a show car just something to tinker with.

1 bravo 6

What type of clear is that?

post-6475-14150798588337_thumb.jpg

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Maybe I can be of some help regarding those unwanted air bubbles. You may want to employ the "Tipping Process" immediately after the painted surface it is rolled. Tipping is taking the widest brush you can use effectively (i.e. 4" on wide flat surfaces, 1-2" on those small and sharply curves areas) and making straight, long uninterrupted passes from one end to the other of the item being painted. However, one only uses the tip of the brush (approximately 1/4") ; thus, the term tipping. This process removes ALL of those dreaded air bubbles in one fell swoop.

I helped build a 12' wooden boat that was fiberglassed over. We used a 2 part epoxy PPG primer ($110 a quart), thinned 50/50, and rolled on with chemical resistent foam rollers. Once complete, we lightly wet sanded using 600 grit and applied a second coat of primer. The topcoat was West Marine's very brillant red (forgot the name), which also was rolled and a total of 3 coats applied. Each and every coat was tipped and wet sanded (moving up the grit ladder) with the final coat wet sanded with 1200 grit.

Sorry for the lengthy reply.

Good luck,

Nancy

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G'Day Paul,

Estapol is a Wattle product. It's a polyurethane gloss, resistant to heat, household chemicals and hard wear. Primarily used on timber furniture and floors. I've done a bit of furniture restoration.

When I had the farm, I used to restore the tractor implements using another Wattle product, the three step Killrust system;

Killrust Rust Eater,

" Metal Primer,

" Epoxy enamel.

Both the primer and enamel are rust inhibiting.

I used the Killrust system on the parts of my Zed that I could handle and after 6 years, there's no sign of the cancer in those areas.

Warming the paint worked for me.

Rick.

:devious: :devious:

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