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monkeyman

Fixing your Z clock

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Hi all,

There has been some discussion about how to go about fixing the clocks that are driven by the small electric motor. I managed to fix the type that are driven by a small electric circuit. I promised to write up something and post it. I finally did it. I couldn't help myself from drawing up a few things and trying to make my little write-up look nice. I was pretty happy with it and showed my wife last night. She called me a nerd! How do you like that?!

I have attached it (hope this works)

If anyone has any corrections or comments, I would love to hear them.

Eric

How to fix your 260Z or 280Z clock - rev 1.pdf

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Hi Eric,

I am so glad you posted this. I've got one of the Citizen calendar clocks that doesnt work and its driven by the same circuit board as in your article.

Thanks VERY much for this, I am off to the electronics store.

Chris A.

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Eric,

I did find another equivalent to the C828 transistor. It's NTE Electronics NTE229 transistor. But they are based in New Jersey USA so that might not help the folks down under.

I buy a lot of stuff from www.mouser.com and they have a great cross reference system.

Again, thanks for the article.

Chris A.

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Great write-up for the electronic clocks. Good job!

Admins - can this thread maybe be moved into the Tech Articles area?

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Excellent write up! Probably as good as you'd get out of a laboratory!

One note however, the Early clocks weren't of this type. This is the second series of clocks, but I'm not sure if they were specific to the Series III or IV. I won't speculate if the Series II weren't mixed either. However, all the clocks I removed from earlier series cars (70-72) didn't have any electronic components. The only way I found out about this style was when I was given one of them.

I can't be absolutely sure of when the change happened as it takes disassembling the clock face in order to peer inside.

But, it is still one of the best write-ups I've seen. Maybe change the title to reflect the electronic components in the interior to differentiate from the one that just deals with the gears / springs.

E

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There has been some discussion about how to go about fixing the clocks that are driven by the small electric motor. I managed to fix the type that are driven by a small electric circuit.

One note however, the Early clocks weren't of this type.

It looks like he already knew that.LOL

I agree; excellent writeup. I wish that my clock (9/71) wasn't mechanical since I didn't have much luck fixing it going the sewing machine oil route.

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Good point, I could have been a bit clearer on which clocks it applies to and how to tell before you pull them out of the dash. From what I have been able to tell (and this was not a thorough investigation), the earliest clocks were motor driven. They changed to the electric circuit driven type in 1974 I think (I have seen an early 260Z with the motor driven clock, and my 1975 260Z has the electric one). So unfortunately, this article wont help the 240Z owners out there.

There is an easy way to tell. The motor driven clocks have the manufacturer name 'JECO' stamped on the face. The electric circuit driven clocks have 'Kanto Seiki' stamped on the face down the bottom (look closely, it is partly obscured by the housing).

These are the conclusions I came to after tinkering with 1/2 dozen clocks. It also might be different here in Australia to elsewhere (though I don't see why).

I think I will update the article, but will first wait to hear any other suggestions or criticisms. (Chris A has already mentioned a different clock this article applies to, and has found another equivalent transistor.... let me know if it works Chris).

Eric

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Zak:

Although not up to the technical expertise of this post's write-up, here's one article for the mechanical clock, JECO.

http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18442

MikeW:

On a separate note, did you try tweaking the pivot points of the pendulum gear? The pendulum gear is the one that rotates one way then the other, there is also a small pin towards the center which "flips" a small lever one way then the other. This is the heart of the clock and what regulates the "tic-toc".

The pivot points are actually screws with an inverted cone to allow the gear axle pin to rotate and be held in place. If those screw pivots are in too tight, they will actually exert pressure on the axle pin and stop it from rotating freely. You want to just barely crack the screw pivots loose, while not unscrewing them so far that the pendulum gear falls out of position.

Try that, as that has been the only other thing that's prevented others from getting their clock to work.

Arne, how long has your clock been working now, since you fixed it? Mine is going on 4+ years.

E

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MikeW:

On a separate note, did you try tweaking the pivot points of the pendulum gear? The pendulum gear is the one that rotates one way then the other, there is also a small pin towards the center which "flips" a small lever one way then the other. This is the heart of the clock and what regulates the "tic-toc".

I'll have to try that. I had given up on fixing it and started a project to install a cheap quartz movement. I gave up on that as well when I couldn't use the original hands and had difficultly fabricating some that looked right - glow in the dark paint and all. :dead:

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Arne, how long has your clock been working now, since you fixed it? Mine is going on 4+ years.
Several weeks now. Still gaining 3-5 minutes per week. I might have to try to slow it down some, but I'd likely go way too far, so I'll probably leave it as is.

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You're right Arne, it takes such a minute tweak on that screw to equal several minutes that 3-5 a week....I'd live with it.

Heck, I'm living with 3+ minutes a DAY. It kind of works out, if I get in the car and I have to set the clock back more than 15 / 20 minutes, it's been almost a full week since I last drove her and re-set the clock. And it reassures me it is still working!

E

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Hi all,

There has been some discussion about how to go about fixing the clocks that are driven by the small electric motor. I managed to fix the type that are driven by a small electric circuit. I promised to write up something and post it. I finally did it. I couldn't help myself from drawing up a few things and trying to make my little write-up look nice. I was pretty happy with it and showed my wife last night. She called me a nerd! How do you like that?!

I have attached it (hope this works)

If anyone has any corrections or comments, I would love to hear them.

Eric

Hi Eric,

I just finished the restauration of my 260Z coupe and the only thing missing was a working clock.

But with your help the job is realy finish now.

Many thanks

Stefan

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Hi all,

I posted the 'How to fix your early Z clock' a while ago now. I have realized that I made a mistake with the transistor pin-outs. I have fixed this error and will try to attach the document to this post. Has anyone tried using the 2N3904 transistor? I never heard much of whether this helped anyone, maybe it didn't because of the mistake I made.

Is it possible to remove the document I originally posted? I would rather it not be used due to the mistake in it.

Eric

How to fix your 260Z or 280Z clock - rev 1.pdf

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I replaced the original file with your updated version-the new file is in both the original post and your last one. Thanks for the work, the correction, and the desire to have it right!

Will

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Awesome file Eric!! I don't have my car with me yet (just moved) but last time I had it out I noticed the clock slowed down and died. (while I'm assuming that it might just need some oil...) The actual technical side being represented here is great. I'm new to this forum, so I'm impressed by the technical section of posts. Thanks!! I'll let you know if I end up rewiring mine.

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Several weeks now. Still gaining 3-5 minutes per week. I might have to try to slow it down some, but I'd likely go way too far, so I'll probably leave it as is.

Arne,

The early clock you repaired is going strong in #32 now after spending several months in #237. I tried repairing a couple of the early clocks about a year ago with no luck, but I decided to give it one more try last night, and got two of the five I tried up and running so far.

-Mike

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I just got a Quartz clock. The clock is working but it's not reading accurately. At first, the clock falls behind all the time. Then sometimes it gets stuck. After searching in the forum, I did try and lube the clock. Now it worked, but the problem I am having now is that the clock is now in reading fast.

I can't find any screw inside the clock that can be adjusted from Slow to Fast.

Is there any solution how to accurately adjust the Quartz clock?

Thanks

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No adjustment on quartz movements, or lubrication points. Electro-mechanical, yes, but you better know what you are doing, or it will be correct only twice a day.

Bonzi Lon

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draztik280,

The quartz clock doesn't have a manual adjustment.

If the clock is not keeping the correct time it needs to be rebuilt

as it will soon stop all together. You should have looked for my post

I wrote several years ago about OILING your clock...don't do it!

These clocks we never oiled or lubricated by the manufacture and for several good reasons. Oil will only bleed out on to critical areas and finally

stain the clock face and plastic parts.

Your clock needs to be rebuilt. If your interested and having your clock refurbished correctly please see my web site at:

www.zclocks.com

Ron

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Thanks ron. I read that post right now. I didn't know about the denatured alcohol. I will try and clean that up and remove the oil. If it won't fix the problem. I still have an extra one. I will definitely send these to you and have them fix since I have heard alot of members here about you. Thanks for the help.

Edited by draztik280

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FYI:  I just sprayed 2 dead clock's workings with brake cleaner, now they work. Not sure for how long but this easy to do trick definitely made a significant change.

These clocks have the electric motor.

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 My Dad used to "fix" his work (logger) pocket watch by soaking it in clean diesel oil and letting it drain. He kept cheap ones going for years that way. Would it be worthwhile to lightly lube the works of these old clocks with a super light weight oil like turbine oil?

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