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How To Get Rear Wheel Studs Out!?


Pennyman

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Well, a couple of my lug nuts were screwed, so I got a couple new ones, and the new ones stripped the threads on the studs. I've got the brake cover and shoes off, but I dunno how to get the studs out. Just bang on them? Enlighten me.

What a crappy thing to happen on a holiday weekend...

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Big hammer. One good hit with a 2 lb sledge should knock each lug clean out.

To install the new ones, put the stud in the hole, put a washer coated in anti-seize over the end of the stud, coat the rest of the threads in anti-seicze, then put a lug nut on. If you have an impact it will help, because basically the next step is to pull the lug stud into the hub by tightening the nut. Quick and easy with an impact.

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  • 1 year later...

Hey, i have the same problem with more then a few of my studs, for someone like me who does not have the right tools, is it worth it to just go out and but the tools for the job or is it better to let a pro handle the job?

And does anyone know how much it would cost for a mechanic to put in new ones?

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You might be better off going to the local equipment supply house and renting an electric impact wrench than having a shop do the job for you. I don't know what the labor rate is in the Bay area, probably $75/hour. If they charge you a couple hours it will get pretty expensive pretty quickly.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I believe I saw a special tool at SEARS that helps with the stud install. Looks kind of like a socket with threads down the middle, I think it was around $30.00 for the tool. Worth checking into...

webdawg1

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That tool is for installing and removing studs like manifold studs that have threads on both ends. Z wheel studs have a knurled section down at the base and this knurled section needs to be pressed into the hub. You could pull the whole thing apart and press it in with a hydraulic press which I suppose is the way Nissan did it originally or you can just pull them in with a nut.

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Big hammer will take them out really fast. Impact gun will put them in really fast. Small hammer will take them out with a lot of sweat and cursing. Socket and long breaker bar will put them back in with a lot of sweat and cursing. But the tolls if you can afford them - you will use them again. Rent them if not. You'd be better off buying than paying a shop to do it.

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Big hammer will take them out really fast. Impact gun will put them in really fast. Small hammer will take them out with a lot of sweat and cursing. Socket and long breaker bar will put them back in with a lot of sweat and cursing. Buy the tools if you can afford them - you will use them again. Rent them if not. You'd be better off buying than paying a shop to do it.

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Thanks, the bigger hammer worked! Much easier than hitting it repeatedly with a ball peen.

Now to reassemble...

Oh good.. I was a bit worried that you would not have enough space between the axle and the backing plate - to get the studs out/in - without having to remove the axle. (been a long time since I had to do that job). I guess I was thinking of the longer racing studs..

Carl B.

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Oh good.. I was a bit worried that you would not have enough space between the axle and the backing plate - to get the studs out/in - without having to remove the axle. (been a long time since I had to do that job). I guess I was thinking of the longer racing studs..

The trick for longer race studs is to drill a hole in the backing plate and slip the lug studs in that way.

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The trick for longer race studs is to drill a hole in the backing plate and slip the lug studs in that way.

My nephew put long studs on the back of his custom 72 Chevy pickup. And drilled 6 holes(!) to remove and install them. When I explained to him that one hole would have done it, he look at me and said "oh, yeah". Kids!:stupid:

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I just swapped out a broken stud last month, and it coudn't have been simpler. Knocked the old one out with the trusty BFH, then slipped the new one in from the back, set it in place by screwing a lugnut on a few turns until it started to seat, then backed off the nut, mounted up the wheel, and just torqued the new stud into place with the lug nut using nothing more than the stock lug wrench.

Worked perfectly. No special tools or anything.

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