Jump to content

IGNORED

Floor pans tar removal question? and other stuff ...


280z1975

Recommended Posts

Hello All,

Well I have finally gotten my Z stripped to the point I would like it to be at. There isn't much on the inside or the outside (less the bottom) to be take off and I now have an idea of where my problem areas are.

The first problem I want to address are the floor pans. I have attached some photos to show the extent of the damage. The driver side is rotted through with three pin hole size spots. The passenger side has rust in the same area but isn't all the way through.

The entire area of my floor board seems to be covered in this tar crap and it is making it quite fun to try and find the rust and treat it. It's all over most of the area including the console area.

Can I just spray paint stripper or aircraft remover to this stuff and get it off that way or should I just manually chip away at the bulk of it (as I started to do) and then get the leftover with paint remover? Do I need to worry about the transmission/console part of the interior (where I am 98% positive there is no rust) or can I just strip the floor pans and focus on that area (where I know there is rust)?

I will also be redoing the underside of the car so I will get to any rust on that side also.

post-10327-1415079655387_thumb.jpg

post-10327-14150796554272_thumb.jpg

post-10327-14150796554552_thumb.jpg

post-10327-14150796554869_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Hi Gregg,

Welcome to the forum! If you do a search for "floorpan" or something similar, you'll find about 100 threads and basically two different ways to deal with that stuff...Good reading---I've been there.

1) Scraper and a heat gun. (what I used) Better if used when it's colder weather so you aren't drenched in sweat (like I was). Once an area's been heated for 30 secs or so, a putty knife will scrape that crap off easy. Then, a little lacquer thinner takes off the last bits...

2) Dry ice. Freezes it so you can chisel it off. Probably more enjoyable in the warmer months.

When I did my floorpans I found only a smattering of pinholes, but felt that overall the pans were not in good shape--flakes of rust, thin spots etc--so I bit the bullet and bought new pans from Zedd Findings and had them welded in--total cost about $900

The soundproofing extends a ways up the trans tunnel, so I would take as much of it off as you can.

Here's the thread with what my floorpans looked like:

http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15103

Good luck,

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started removing the tar mat a couple weeks ago to see the extent of my rust problem... It was around 30 degrees (F) in the garage when I started chipping away at it, comes off pretty easy... If the dry ice is that much colder, I would think that it would be the best route to go rather than the heat gun method.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gregg, ditto to what has been said above. I used a gasket scraper and most came off in chunks. I would take as much on the trans tunnel as you can. I found surface rust way up the tunnel that I didn't think was there. Same in the back, take it all off if you can. To me your pans didn't look too bad. The area under the seat mount may be patched but the rest might make it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. I can get Dry Ice just down the road at the local grocery store and it should make for things going a whole lot easier for removal.

Now once I remove all this tar/sound insulation, would some Por-15 and then soundproofing material (B-quiet Extreme (aka brown bread) be a sutable replacement?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dry ice less residue to clean up later. In my case faster also. Smells much better also..

Dude.....I love the smell of melting tar in the evening...it's the smell of victory!

It took me all of an hour to do both sides of the floorpans with a heatgun, so time's not much of a problem. Longer to do the wheelwells, mainly because of the angles, grooves and overall bigger square footage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My floor pan was split lingth wise about 18'' on the passenger side floor. Outboard of center and rusted badly . This side I replaced with a Zedd floor pan . On the driver side I had pin holes in one area just ahead of the seat . This area I repaired with POR and POR matt. You need to be the judge , if the metal is thin from rust , replace it. As to the tar matt . I only removed it up the side of the tranny tunnel about 2'' above where I found zero rust. I can see no need to remove it , if it is rust free then apply more. From the pictures it looks like heavy rust scale on the driver side by the rocker . Have a long look at this area. With this type of unibody construction the floor is part of the frame so keep this in mind . I sand blasted all bare metal and any rust , did the necessary repairs . Then treated the metal as directed by POR 15 and used there products to treat the floors both inside and under the car . Your floors from the pictures don't look to be in that bad of shape , but pictures don't always tell all . Have a good look under the tar matt in the back floor and around the spair well . I have pictures if you are interested, send me a PM Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now once I remove all this tar/sound insulation, would some Por-15 and then soundproofing material (B-quiet Extreme (aka brown bread) be a sutable replacement?

That's what I did. Frankly your floor pans look pretty good compared to mine and most of the others I've seen. Once you get all of the tar off you can use POR-15. Be sure to follow the directions. When you use the marine clean and metal ready you need to rinse with water. It seemed really weird to me to having a running garden hose on the inside of the car but that's what you really need to do. Much of it will go out through the drain holes but I also used a wet-dry vacuum. It really gets the water out quickly. After the coats of POR-15 I used Dynamat and then another layer of foil backed insulation for an additional sound and heat barrier as well as a bit of padding under the carpet for comfort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Greg,

Are you doing both the inside and out?

Sorry... Gregg failed to notice your thumbnails below. :nervous: I ditto what beandip is saying. The floors appear to be solid. I as well have extensive before and after shots in my gallery of a complete floor pan, frame rail replacement and POR 15 process etc... I am currently in the process of installing the sound deadning insulation.

I live in Houston ...PM me if you would like some info., sources and/or help with you Z in the Houston area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. I can get Dry Ice just down the road at the local grocery store and it should make for things going a whole lot easier for removal.

Now once I remove all this tar/sound insulation, would some Por-15 and then soundproofing material (B-quiet Extreme (aka brown bread) be a sutable replacement?

What j hammer and Mike said is true . One vary important thing with POR is no moisture and no oil of any kind. Be absolutly sure there is no moisture or the POR will foam and not seal off the metal .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to be off-topic...

Jackhammer, what kind of insulation are you using? How heavy is it? Costly?

Thanks,

Steve

What I was installing this past weekend was a generic Dyna-Mat like

product. It's a 60 mil. rubber mat (closed cell) with a aluminum foil on one side and adhesive on the other. Ebay has several sellers that sell it...it's about a $1.00 a square foot.

In addition to that I first applied a gal. of the Dupli-Color Truck bed liner to the floor and inside the doors. I will finish it with a couple of layers of 3/8" thick aluminum laminated fiber padding.

Hopefully... that will be enough so that I only hear a nice low mellow rumble of the pipes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got new floors from ZEDD FINDINGS, they are excellent. After they were welded in, I cleaned the area with wax/grease remover, then etched the metal with METALREADY (from the por-15 guys) then cleaned again with the por-15 cleaner (marine clean?), then I por-15'd the underside AND topside of the floor pans. It is noticeable where a drop of sweat fell on the por-15, theres a big bubble there now. Im going to use the por-15 tie-coat primer on the underside then use some sort of coating on top of that I guess. Por-15 is excellent, but it is runny and the surface must be bone dry. I needed 2 coats, but follow the directions to a T. I'll post pictures of the process soon in my galley.

Zak

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im going to use the por-15 tie-coat primer on the underside then use some sort of coating on top of that I guess. Por-15 is excellent' date=' but it is runny and the surface must be bone dry. I needed 2 coats, but follow the directions to a T. I'll post pictures of the process soon in my galley.

Zak[/quote']

I used the tie-coat on my project as well. I could not imagine sanding the entire Por-15'd bottom and inside so that something else would stick.

Something I would do differently in the future would be to apply the Por-15 Rust Preventative with a paint sprayer. I brushed it on and sprayed the Tie-Coat and the Por-15 Chassis Coat and the results were better. Should you decide to spray on the Tie Coat I found thinning to 30% with Xylene was best. The instructions say 10%. Trust me 30% is best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.