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Garage floor paint Question


beandip

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I just returned from Home Depot , and they have a couple of options . Behr brand paint , has a '' 1-PART EPOXY " acrilic paint for garage floors. They also have two part Epoxy paint that is made by another company , they both have flakes to spread and or stuff to make it less slippery when wet. Has any one used either of these and if so how do they hold up ? I am wondering how tuff the coating is if I choose to use my floor jack with the steel wheels , or the dollies . I have used concrete porch paint in the past on a different house and durability and slickness when wet, is a deffinate concern. With all the rain here in Oregon , I don't want my wife to slip and fall on a slick floor when we drive in during winter . Once any of the coverings are down you have to live with it . Gary

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I used the Rustoelum gray 2 part epoxy-I did not use the sprinkels-, and it scratches too easily-no floor jack use, but I do scoot heavy boxes around-hence the scratches. Rubber wheeled dollies do no damage.

The floor is not slippery when wet with anything buy oil, and it is impervious to solvents.

Will

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I used Spreadrock on my front steps , but they say it is good for garage floors also. It works well for the steps but I'm skeptical about garage usage .I think if you look up daich coatings they'll have the info.

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I've been thinking of doing this myself. One thing to consider is you apparently have to let the stuff dry for at least 7 days before driving on it. If that's truly the case I was thinking I might have to do a portion of the garage at a time and relegate one of the three cars to spending the night outdoors for a while.

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Mikew , I just checked the Behr web site , you are right several days before you can drive a car on there product, 72 hrs if you use cardboard under the tires. What you must go through to prep in my case is too much trouble. My garage is as old as my 240 . LOL mriz I will look into daich and see what they say . Will , I cant remember the brand of the 2 part epoxy that H D sells , but if it scratches just sliding boxes on it , it is too fragile for what I want. Regular porch paint will do that , I have used that before . Plus it is easy to recoat . I was thinking of painting the areas where you can walk around the cars one color and under the car contrasting . Or maby a black and white checker board . I did my old hobby shop where I did all my reloading in CAMMO and coated it with urathane varish. It wore like vynal and looked great . I don't know about driveing on it though. If I can come up with something I will pass it on . If any one has anny suggestions please pass them on . Gary

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My opinion with "Garage Floor Paint" is that it does NOT work. It peels and flakes off over time and looks like crap. Especially when you work on your car like we do and are wheeling floor jacks around, Jack stands, ect. that scratch the hell out of it.

I happen to come across this stuff http://www.allmats.com/site/439205/page/639085 Looks pretty nice but I haven't tried it yet.

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Gary,

Remind me to talk about this on Sunday. It seems I have seen a couple of products featured on My Classic Car on the Speed Channel. One thing you may want to consider is that for most products the floor must be very dry before applying. That means July around here. Not sure of temperature concerns, but I'd think over 60 degrees as a guess. There is one prooduct that must be applied on a wet floor. That means as soon as you are done getting out any oil stains to allow any product to stick, you can start the application. Not a bad thought for a weekend project. Oh, I forgot, any 2 consecutive days can be the weekend for you. Lucky SOB!

I think if you find the website for My Classic Car or Eastwood, you should find what I am referring to.

B.

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Thats the beauty of those mats I posted above. Floor doesn't have to be PERFECTLY clean, no drying issues to worry about, ect.

Plus, anyone else have the problem with there ramps sliding on the smooth garage floor when you try to drive up on them? I would think this stuff would solve that problem as well.

I personally like the coin pattern :)

Coinlarge.jpg

Don't have to worry about your wife slippin and sliding on this stuff beandip :D

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http://www.allmats.com/site/439205/page/639085

Yep, comes in a roll. No adhesive needed. You can see for yourself by clicking the link I posted above.

As for Jacks/Jack stands, It comes in 3 different grades. (Standard 0.55 thick, commercial .075 thick, and Industrial .085 thick) As far as I know It's suppose to rebound after being compressed. Like I said before, I haven't tried it yet myself :) Looks like you can get a sample of it before you buy it to test it out also. Can't do that with the paint. Like you said, once its on, it's on :D

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Gary,

As usual I sit here in the early morning hours and have the laptop and TV going. I looked up the 2 options I was talking about.

www.ucoatit.com

http://www.myclassiccar.com/MCCTV/2005Season/10006/tip10006.shtml

As you can imagine, any paint down surface will only stick if you remove the oils and all of that POR15. If the water beads up, the new surface won't stick very long. These paint down products are used in machine shops everywhere and they are tough. This U-coat it looks to be able to handle jack stands and florr jacks and chemicals.

www.racedeck.com (web site didn't get me a lot of info)

http://www.myclassiccar.com/MCCTV/2005Season/10009/tip10009.shtml

This is a snap together product made for garages. Made in SLC. Not sure how it will handle implements but I'm sure they can answer that. You can put down a yellow stripe to go with the car!. Thay can even put a Z logo into a square or the entire floor. Very Cool! Probably expensive though. And this product can be moved to your next house and added to, for your 4 car garage (I know, I'm a dreamer)

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that roll out stuff, if it doesn't need adhesive, what will stop it from coming undone or scrunching up if you push it with something....just seems like it would work...

Yea, you have to wonder. If you are in the center, it will probably stay pretty well, bit on an edge....

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The only problem for me with the lay down floor coverings is the expence, it is pretty costly, at least for me. Paint wouldn't hold up for me I don't think, with rolling the car around and sometimes pulling it around lifted on a floor jack... I was thinking about the old fashion use glue to stick them down floor tiles. I've seens some older comercial shops that have that down and it seems to work well, anyone think this wouldn't be a good idea besides the "wet" factor?

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Bryan,

I didn't think about the floors at work, you're right, at least what they use there holds up. I wonder what my chances are of getting a 40 year old floor clean enough?? Lots of oil has hit the floor here in the last 25 years....

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If your worried about the corners flipping up, or moving, then you CAN use adhesive where needed. They just say it's not required but you can use adhesive to secure it in place if it's a problem.

This stuff in my opinion just makes more sence for me. my garage floor has some chips and cracks that paint would not hide. Plus this stuff I think would make your garage, or shop safer because it wouldn't be so darn slick. With this product, I might actually be able to drive my Z on ramps with out the damn ramps sliding forward. :)

beandip, I too thought about that later last night, Worse case IF you do have to put a thin, square piece of wood under your jack stands that wouldn't be so bad. I personally don't have the time to degrease my floor and remove old oil spills and other contaminants like dust ect. to lay down paint and wait 7 days after painting before you can walk or drive on it.

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I used www.ucoatit.com on mine. Its epoxy followed by a urethane top coat. It's SUPPOSED to hold up to everything. Cost me $900 for a 3.5 car garage.

The good thing with it is the first coat goes on extremely thin, very watered down, which makes the epoxy really soak into the concrete. I have never had any problems with the base coat at all. Its 3 years old now.

Bad

-M/T ET Streets laying on their side stained it.

-I left a mixture of brake fluid and oil on the floor under the car overnite and it stained it yellowish. brake fluid alone, or oil alone, won't do anything to it.

-I sprayed too much brake cleaner and didn't wipe it up right away, because they say its impervious to chemicals, but brake cleaner bubbled the urethane.

-the 6" strip that is just outside the garage door has bubbled up due to standing water in the rain.

Still, overall, its the best floor covering I've ever had in a garage. I put it on new when we bought the house.

We actually went from closing, over to the house and immediately started to paint the garage gloss white, walls, and ceiling and install 2 ceiling fans. The neighbors thought we were crazy, but the garage is my most important room!

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I used the exact same Behr epoxy that was first asked about in this thread. I bought my house from an old lady and the garage had been used but there was only a very small spot probably a foot in diameter where there was oil in the concrete. I followed the directions on the can as closely as possible, and cleaned the crap out of the floor before I put the epoxy down.

I rolled it on with the garage door open, and still ended up getting VERY high off of the fumes. Whew. It was funny cause I had a friend there helping me and when we started we were making nice straight lines back and forth, and after a while our lines were... less than uniform you might say.

It looked great right after we painted it. After a couple of years of using it I can say that the epoxy held on reasonably well under the abuse of rolling a floor jack, but it couldn't take scraping. I dropped the transmission out one day and slid it over so I could access the pressure plate bolts and it carved a big chunk out of the epoxy. Also jackstands could scratch through the epoxy as well. Some ATE Super Blue brake fluid definitely left a blue stain in the epoxy. Oil cleaned up easily though.

So it stained, it was fairly easily scratched, and the foot diameter oil spot that I painted over did eventually start to peel back. It was easy to clean though, and spills wiped right up. The one thing I really liked about it was that the white floor would reflect light under the car so visibility was pretty good under there. I think it would have worked better if the floor was NEW when the epoxy was laid down.

One last thing, I was working in a business at the time where the entire warehouse floor was epoxied. The only time that floor lost any of the epoxy was when a piece of the concrete chipped off. That was TOUGH stuff. I asked the owner of the building about it and he said it was "rated for food service", not sure what that meant, but he also said that it was TOXIC stuff and the guy who put it down used a full rebreather suit and still got very seriously ill from the fumes. That epoxy had been down for maybe 15 years by the time I came around. Epoxy can definitely work and be tough, but the keys are using the right stuff, applying it the right way, and putting it on new concrete IMO.

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