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bluezcrazy

What Electric Fuel Pump upgrade???

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Hello all,

Got a mechanical fuel pump block off plate, and need to get a new electric fuel pump. Was wanting to know what everone is using that has done this upgrade?

I was planning on finding a Carter GP-4070, as listed on L-Series performance mods and enhancements site. Just wanted to get everyone's opinon on what worked best for them?

The car has DGV Weber's in case that matters. Thanks for any help, or suggestions.

Bryce

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Bryce,

I re-plumbed my entire fuel system during this past summer and did a complete write up on it. This included the removal of the mechanical pump as well as the installation of a new electric pump to replace the OEM one that came with the car originally.

You can find the write up here:

I have triple Weber 40 DCOEs which require regulated fuel pressure between 3-4 PSI. Your Webers likely require the same.

Ping me if you have any questions on this and I can probably help you out.

Mike.

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We have good results with the Holley Red fuel pump. It is installed in the rear where the original electric pump was. A pressure regulator is mounted on the front fender near the original fuel filter location. We added a fuel filter between the tank and pump and have 2 in the engine compartment, one for each carb.

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Be sure you put the best filter you can between the tank and the fuel pump - you'll be glad you did. I also put a small inline filter from the pressure regulator to the carbs, just in case a little debris got through the first one. You don't want to have anything that blocks or holds open your needle valves.

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Mazda RX7 pump...from a carbureted model of course. Use the stock wiring in the rear. If you have a pre-73 car, you'll need to find the unused plug inside the dash next to the radio & connect it with an inline fuse. Pump will activate when they key is in the "ON" position, and no regulator is needed. Try not to get roped into a discussion about fuel return lines, some folks around here get hyper-opinionated. Just leave everything stock, you don't need extra fuel filters, one's enough...the carbs have micro screens in the inlet pipes on the fuel bowls.

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If you are running double's or triples pressurized I would strongly recommend a filter between fuel tank and the electric pump to protect the pump from debris - if you don't make sure all the debris (if any) is filtered and it gets into you electrical pump it can total damage the electrical pump. On your SU carbs most of them have been tinkered with by so many PO's at this time you are lucky to have any inlet filters at all - you better double check before you assume you are protected by a non-existant filter.;)

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Wow,

I'm surprised at how many replied. Thanks for all the info. I have 2 glass see through filters, with replaceable screens I was going to use. It sounds like I will need to be purchasing a fuel pressure regulator also? What type/brand is everyone running? I hear the cheaper chrome ones with no gauge are not the ones to get, is that right? Thanx again.

Bryce

Edited by bluezcrazy

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I neglected to remember that the carbs are DGVs, I'm not certain if they have inlet screens like the SU's...you'd better stick to using the additional filters just to be sure.

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FWIW, to answer your question about the Carter fuel pump...that's the one I picked after reading Dave's site like you did. It works fine. I put a NAPA fuel filter between the tank and the pump. I did get a pressure regulator and mounted it after the fuel filter in the engine compartment. The Carter is a bit noisy, but once you get going the noise is drowned out by the exhaust/stereo.

Cheers, Mike

Edited by Pop's Z

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We have been using this one. It is a cheapy for sure but has worked well on our stock engine. I suspect for higher horsepower it might not flow enough fuel.

As far as filters go, a filter before the pump is necessary for rotary type pumps such as the Holley. Diaphram pumps are more tolerant of dirt.

post-21519-14150817284381_thumb.jpg

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Thank you guys for all the help. Will let you all know what I end up doing. May have to do some SS line work also after seeing Mike W's write up.

Bryce

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The easiest way is just to pull a new power line - run it through the transmission tunnel - connect it a power supply tie to your starter switch - put it all on a relay with ground - tie a fuse into your line and your done. A 15-30 minute job at max.

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I also got Carter GP-4070, but still haven't install yet.

Is there any quiet electric fuel pump recommendation?

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I also got Carter GP-4070, but still haven't install yet.

Is there any quiet electric fuel pump recommendation?

I think I have the same pump, and I have it all hooked up and will hopefully fire it up tonight.

A lot of how loud these pumps are is in how you mount them. If your carter is the same as mine, then it came with rubber bushings. I put those in between the frame and the pump bracket, AND in between the pump and the pump bracket. The pump is double isolated. It still may be loud, but the install is clean and extremely rugged and durable. I will let you know how she performs, hopefully in less than 24 to 48 hours.

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On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2011 at 1:33 PM, Pop's Z said:

FWIW, to answer your question about the Carter fuel pump...that's the one I picked after reading Dave's site like you did. It works fine. I put a NAPA fuel filter between the tank and the pump. I did get a pressure regulator and mounted it after the fuel filter in the engine compartment. The Carter is a bit noisy, but once you get going the noise is drowned out by the exhaust/stereo.

Cheers, Mike

Have you ever measured the pressure of your Carter P4070 Electric pump before the carbs? How much pressure?

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My cheapo AirTex fuel pump gives me 2.3PSI at the carbs & my bowls have never run dry.

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I've run Carter and inexpensive Facet pumps on my Z for 40 years.  Both have worked well until "end of life" necessitates replacement.  Even the stock mechanical pump was adequate until I chose to go electric for no particular reason other than the newer Zs had electric pumps.

Dennis

 

Edited by psdenno
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I'm finally getting around to replacing the manual fuel pump with an electric pump on my '73 240Z with duel webbers.

It seems most people who have swapped out for an electrical pump, mount the pump close to the gas tank. Other than running a little more wire and fuel tubing, is there any disadvantages of mounting the electric fuel pump in the engine compartment?

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DugsZ -- Electric fuel pumps are better at "pushing" than "pulling" thats why you mount it near the tank.  Mechanical pumps are the opposite, they do great with suction.

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