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Cooling Fan Original Color


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Sorry, I should have been more specific.

It is a metal fan from an early series 1. I can clearly see the white-ish paint under the poorly painted orange. I am getting ready to blast and prime this tomorrow and was wondering what color to finish it with.

John

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Mine is not in the car right now. (I use a lighter plastic fan for my normal driving.) It is a very creamy color. I wouldn't call it white, more of a very light cream color. The color in the picture looks fairly accurate on my laptop.

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Thanks Arne. That is very similar to what I see when I sand off the orange in the thin areas. I wonder if I could find something similar in a rattle can?

Well, I guess I will see if I get another response that has an "exact" color, if not, I will be shopping at 8 tomorrow.

Thanks,

John

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Hi, John.... I had one of those in my hands yesterday, and the color is as Arne and his picture describe it. Unfortunately I cannot help with the color code, but you should easily find a suitable color on the shelf. That should look nice when you are done blasting and refinishing. Show us some before & after pictures.

What media are you using?

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I am going to "peel back" the orange and see if I can get it color matched. I will let you guys know the result.

John, I will post pictures but am not sure of the correct media. I would guess that the blades of the fan are made of something like galvanized steel and don't know how fragile that would be. I have coal slag and glass beads. Any recommendations?

John

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IMO, coal slag would remove the paint best. Be conservative and as equal as possible in all areas to make sure you don't remove too much metal in any one place so as to throw off the balance. You should be just fine as long as you don't focus hard on bare metal for an extended length of time. Just hit it to get the paint off and make the metal look nice and move on. (Remove all grease/junk before blasting.) You should end up with a nice surface that's ready for primer. (After blasting I usually spray & wipe down with mineral spirits prior to painting to assure a clean surface.)

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You could use some aircraft remover... Works in min's to remove paint. Spray it on and then wash it off. This way you dont have to wory about removing any metal and throwing the balance off. Follow up with some wax/oil remover, prime and paint!

Good luck!

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Rust-Oleum #7793 'Satin Shell White' is very close to the original color.

Yes, I found Rustoleum Antique White to be an almost exact match. It is a gloss finish as my original color appeared to be gloss.

Thanks for the tip.

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IMO, coal slag would remove the paint best. Be conservative and as equal as possible in all areas to make sure you don't remove too much metal in any one place so as to throw off the balance. You should be just fine as long as you don't focus hard on bare metal for an extended length of time. Just hit it to get the paint off and make the metal look nice and move on. (Remove all grease/junk before blasting.) You should end up with a nice surface that's ready for primer. (After blasting I usually spray & wipe down with mineral spirits prior to painting to assure a clean surface.)

Yes, that's what I figured on your previous advice to me. I hit it with coal slag at 80 psi and took my time. This pressure, combined with some previously used slag, peeled the first layer (orange) off gently and is now gently blasting away the second layer (white). I am about 25% done.

Looking at the next few posts I probably could have hit it with stripper or sanded it down but I'm not smart enough to take the easy way out (stripper) and I really wanted it to be painted fresh from bare metal.

Thanks for all the tips. I will post pictures when done.

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On an item like this that has crevices and such (like where the blades are riveted to the hub), I prefer NOT to use stripper, as it can seep into the crevice, and then slowly eat at your new paint from behind. This could be a bigger problem than normal on a part that spins fast as does the fan, as the centrifugal force would tend to sling the stripper out. So using dry abrasives seems the safer course.

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......I prefer NOT to use stripper, as it can seep into the crevice, and then slowly eat at your new paint from behind. This could be a bigger problem than normal on a part that spins fast as does the fan, as the centrifugal force would tend to sling the stripper out.

VERY good point for anybody that may stumble onto this thread.

Thanks Arne.

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On an item like this that has crevices and such (like where the blades are riveted to the hub), I prefer NOT to use stripper, as it can seep into the crevice, and then slowly eat at your new paint from behind. This could be a bigger problem than normal on a part that spins fast as does the fan, as the centrifugal force would tend to sling the stripper out. So using dry abrasives seems the safer course.

Most people don’t have the luxury of being able to blast items, or, they lack the experience. I find that using aircraft stripper works great because it is water soluble and it works instantly. I use it, then a parts washer to completely rinse away stripper, then put it in a parts dryer to finish it up. I have had no problem with permanently joined objects. If done right, it is worry free.

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..... I find that using aircraft stripper works great because it is water soluble and it works instantly. I use it, then a parts washer to completely rinse away stripper, then put it in a parts dryer to finish it up. I have had no problem with permanently joined objects. If done right, it is worry free.

Thanks for the insight Garagegoon.

In my case I am just learning how to blast (seems like common sense is the most necessary thing to have) and have not used chemical strippers to strip something as large as a car ever. So it is a learning experience for me all the way around.

I would imagine that if not done properly, by an experienced person, chemical strippers could lie in wait if not thoroughly "neutralized" prior to painting.

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Most people don’t have the luxury of being able to blast items, or, they lack the experience. I find that using aircraft stripper works great because it is water soluble and it works instantly. I use it, then a parts washer to completely rinse away stripper, then put it in a parts dryer to finish it up. I have had no problem with permanently joined objects. If done right, it is worry free.

I would also think that people that don't have the luxury of being able to blast items (I assume you mean equipment) probably don't have the luxury of having access to a parts washer and a parts dryer either though.

-MIke

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I would also think that people that don't have the luxury of being able to blast items (I assume you mean equipment) probably don't have the luxury of having access to a parts washer and a parts dryer either though.

-MIke

True......

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  • 1 month later...

Here are some pictures. I have to say that it looks pretty good. I did end up with a few runs that needed to be sanded down but all in all it turned out nice.

I accomplished this as follows:

Removed the top layer of paint with pure acetone and a rag.

Blasted in a small blasting cabinet with coal slag (black beauty) at 60-70 psi

Was careful not to blast too heavily after the paint came off or around the rivets

Primed it with rattle can sandable auto primer (Rustoleum)

Applied 4 coats of Rustoleum Gloss Antique White (#7794) I found this to be an almost exact match and the old paint looked to be gloss. I sanded after the second coat with 600 and after the third coat with 800.

It would have been a little easier to paint the fan if I had a small booth to hang it from. Might have to make that this weekends project. Anybody have a small say 3x3 booth in the garage that they could provide pictures of?

Thanks for all the tips.

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