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Nasty, Dirty, Sick valves


sideshowbob

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Ugly, thick deposits on the tops of the intake valves (haven't gotten to the exhaust, yet). I'd very much like to clean the while I have the intake removed (I've taken to 'fiddling with it now that it's off). How best to proceed? I know of the seafoam in the intake bit, but this is somewhat too serious a buildup to trust to that. I suppose I could just scrape it off, but it would then possible find it's way into the combustion chamber doing god knows what to my rings/valves/walls. I'm wondering just what's going on here. Two intake valves have 'wet' looking deposits possible caused by the leaky injectors or possible bad valve guides there.

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I wouldn't mess with it on the engine, you'll never get all of it out and you'll end up sucking it into the engine on startup. The problem is your valve guide seals are shot allowing oil to soak down the valve stem where it creates these deposits. If you are not going to pull the head to fix it I would leave it alone.

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I wouldn't mess with it on the engine, you'll never get all of it out and you'll end up sucking it into the engine on startup. The problem is your valve guide seals are shot allowing oil to soak down the valve stem where it creates these deposits. If you are not going to pull the head to fix it I would leave it alone.

Don't wana. Valve seals can be replaced with the head on, and only two are bad (slightly). The remainder is from the brake fluid that was sucked into the intake due to a leaky MC. After a good cleaning I'll soak everything in seafoam. Problem is, I'm not sure how to clean it without scoring the valves, though I think they should be fairly resistant. I guess I'll use a rag soaked in something nasty. Maybe I'll use the vac though plug holes. How is this different from seafoaming your intake at idle to clean it?

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I wouldn't mess with it on the engine, you'll never get all of it out and you'll end up sucking it into the engine on startup. The problem is your valve guide seals are shot allowing oil to soak down the valve stem where it creates these deposits. If you are not going to pull the head to fix it I would leave it alone.

I agree with Lance. Leave it alone. Either take the head off and do it properly or leave it alone. Your asking for a world of trouble if you start messing with the deposits. Imagine one piece of crud getting stuck between the valve and the valve seat. There goes your compression.

On another note what is the condition of the rest of the engine? If you have build up on the valves what's it look like in the rest of the engine?

My $.02, leave it alone until you can afford a proper rebuild.

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I agree with Lance. Leave it alone. Either take the head off and do it properly or leave it alone. Your asking for a world of trouble if you start messing with the deposits. Imagine one piece of crud getting stuck between the valve and the valve seat. There goes your compression.

On another note what is the condition of the rest of the engine? If you have build up on the valves what's it look like in the rest of the engine?

My $.02, leave it alone until you can afford a proper rebuild.

The intake is full of carbon (front fire?) and ugly gunk that's proving difficult to remove, as is the throttle body. The cam and associated parts look quite good, with little wear. The crud stocking between the valves may be contributing to my bad compression results (140-150) I posted about earlier (Gas in the oil ect..). It's probably time for a rebuild already but I'm really iffy about doing it in a parking lot. Here comes my next eviction notice...... It seems that the PO ran this car in a horrible state of tune for some time.

Here's some bad pictures:

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Have you had any success with thr SeaFoam? I see a number of products on the shelf at the auto parts store that "guarantee " to clean out your engine, some with only one bottle! I wouldn't mind adding a bottle of cheaper stuff once a month or so to clean it out & ckeep it nice & clean thereafter..

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Haven't attempted to use it yet, but I hear good things about it. I honestly don't think it will clean up the deposits I have right now by itself, however. I'm still scraping gasket right now but I'll hopefully get back to this tomorrow after changing out the starter in the Olds (died again this morning). I so badly want to remove the head and look inside but I'll be adding an unacceptable element of risk to my, already somewhat shady, work if I do so. The mess I create will attract far too much attention at the moment. Strange how many offers I get for the beast even though it never seems to move. I'll post the results later for #$#@% and giggles. I still need to remove the headers, clean the intake, replace the TB (new springs thrown together with a ground-plate block off for the bcdd) ect, ad nauseum.

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SHOWBOB , What are you trying to acomplish here ? As was mentioned before , you have faulty valve stem seals . My old L24 had the same thing , it was like tar . But it was easy to clean off the valve stem through the port. If you are seeing deposits along the valve train , around the springs and such , DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN THIS OR DISTURB IT. If you mess with this you will not be able to get it all and a chunk that gets by your attempt could lodge in a oil passage and block it. It sounds like a valve job is need in the vary least , and most likely a complete rebuild . If you dont have a proper shop or garage is not smart. If you just pull the engine and take it someplace to do the rebuild this is different. But trying to do it in a parking lot ?????? My 5c Gary

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SHOWBOB , What are you trying to acomplish here ? As was mentioned before , you have faulty valve stem seals . My old L24 had the same thing , it was like tar . But it was easy to clean off the valve stem through the port. If you are seeing deposits along the valve train , around the springs and such , DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN THIS OR DISTURB IT. If you mess with this you will not be able to get it all and a chunk that gets by your attempt could lodge in a oil passage and block it. It sounds like a valve job is need in the vary least , and most likely a complete rebuild . If you dont have a proper shop or garage is not smart. If you just pull the engine and take it someplace to do the rebuild this is different. But trying to do it in a parking lot ?????? My 5c Gary

I'm trying to do exactly what you've just described having done. There are no deposits on the top of the cylinder head (valve spring/cam area), only on the valve stems/tops (visible through the port). As I mentioned before... two seals are leaky, the rest is from BRAKE FLUID. Yes, BRAKE FLUID. I'll change the seals later with the head in place once the neccesary tools are available.

I'm getting rid of the BCDD because I want to. There is no rational explanation for this, other than the simplification of the underhood workings. If it's a problem, I'll replace it later. I have inexplicable air leaks.

I'm still playing with the intake/TB while it's sitting indoors. It's ok. Calm down guys. I promise I won't break her. Well, if I do I'll fix it.

Yes. I am insane. I've done worse in a parking lot, wish I had the pictures for you. The victim of that operation runs quite well, for an Olds with copper pipe and JB weld holding it's plastic intake together.

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