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Racer X

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Everything posted by Racer X

  1. Whenever I have had engine block work done, I have given the machine shop the cylinder block, complete rotating assembly (crankshaft, connecting rods, damper pulley, flywheel and clutch cover). The machinist sourced and fitted the pistons. The machinist and I had a clear understanding of what I wanted, including the piston configuration. I was given everything after the work was completed, including rings and bearings, and prior to assembly I checked bearing clearances and ring end gaps.
  2. In any hydraulic system the cup side of a seal faces the pressure of the system. That way the pressure forces the seal against the bore and rod.
  3. Wonder why he is selling the engine, bumpers, and the aftermarket carbon fiber bumper?
  4. Looks like a nice instrument panel. No cracks and unmolested. I would simply clean it with mild detergent, then dress it with a plastic dressing.
  5. Odd. That doesn't look like Paul Loquesto Newman.
  6. After all that work I’d carve out an adapter to mount the original stuff. Or make something all your own.
  7. Have you looked into one of these? https://www.technoversions.com/TachMatch.html
  8. I’m in the country, on 6 acres, and a private road, so no worries from Citiots.
  9. Looks like the V8 might have been a little bit much for that one.
  10. And a 2+2 in Snohomish for $2,800. Extra intake manifolds. Lots of cancer pics. https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/cto/d/snohomish-78-datsun-280z/7475720654.html
  11. A V8 Z in North Bend. $28,000 https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/d/north-bend-240/7482946215.html
  12. Your boneyard looks a bit more tidy than mine.
  13. Since we all seem to be traveling down motorcycle memory lane, here is one of mine. A 1977 Honda Hawk, bought brand new shortly after college. Still have it but haven’t ridden it in a very long time.
  14. There is a guy on Ratsun, who lives in Texas, that has made a few wood rims for steering wheels. It is a fairly straightforward process. Make a circular jig for a router, select a nice cut of wood, rout the two halves, glue them onto the rim, and finish the wood. One he laminated several different types of wood stained different colors. It looks awesome. He even made a matching shift knob. Check it out here: https://ratsun.net/topic/78921-diy-steering-wheels/#comment-1700673
  15. Thanks Cliff. So this site lists, but doesn’t really describe the differences in the green and blue dyed 100 octane avgas. I did find a Shell avgas site that does. So the green dyed avgas is an older formulation that has tetra ethyl lead in it, and the blue dyed avgas has a lower amount of lead in it than the green dyed fuel, hence, the “LL” designation. Sheesh, I learn something new everyday.
  16. What is the web page this is from Cliff?
  17. Looks like the green must be unleaded. I always go for the highest grade at the pump when I go to the airport to buy fuel, and 100LL (100 octane low lead) is usually the highest grade. I’ll need to have a look when I go next time, and see if they have the unleaded.
  18. Blue. It is dyed so it can readily identified by the tax cops looking for people who are trying to avoid road taxes. The racing gasoline I used to buy is dyed purple. Off road diesel (for tractors and heavy machinery) is dyed red for the same reason.
  19. The racing fuel I was using in my race Z usually ran $8 to $10 a gallon. Eventually I went to the local airport and picked up 100 octane low lead for about $6 a gallon.
  20. The 280Z steering wheels I have are covered in leather, and the rim cross section is about twice the diameter of the faux wood wheels that came on the 240Z.
  21. A package arrived from France the other day.
  22. Hi Ryan, So sorry to read of your loss. Allow me to express my deepest sympathies to you and your family. Regards, Racer
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