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TBK1

Sanding ?

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I did notice tho when spraying that I didnt get a MIST affect like I though I would, it was more like little spatters, had to go over an area like 4 or 5 times to see a WET Solid level coat, using a HVLP from napa and tried at 30 psi and 40 psi about same results, is this maybe a problem with not enough reducer, tried to do the 8 parts paint, 1 part hardner and then reduce it by 25 percent like the paint guy told me but my mix cup was HUGE for this small amount of paint , might not had it thin enough??

Also are you supposed to wet sand and buff single coat?? got a little trash in it but not much, forgot to turn off the hvac DUH!!!!!!!

BY THE WAY!! you guys are GREAT to continue this thread and educate me like you have THANK YOU!!!

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For my part, you're welcome. That's what this site, in my opinion, is all about.

I'll defer to John on details of using the HVLP. My experience is limited and sketchy at best. I use the older LVHP systems where 25-30 psi were common for TOUCH UP guns,, and you'd routinely spray at 45-60 psi.

The mix ratio you mention is consistent with what I would have reduced by, but AFAIK you do need to reduce further for HVLP.

As far as sanding a single coat of paint, if you're correcting problems AND the coat is sufficiently thick enough to withstand sanding, then go for it. But unless you're planning on spending a LOT of time and money on it, I would have to gauge it by the amount of dirt you got into it.

2¢

E

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Side note, related to topic but an aside to thread:

HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure: Method of using a HIGH VOLUME of air, and low pressure in the paint container to force the paint into the air stream. The volume of air is at a LOW PRESSURE but moving quickly (due to the volume). This disperses the paint in larger droplets, and thereby minimizing the "mist" which is more commonly seen in LVHP.

LVHP = Low Volume High Pressure: Now the HIGH PRESSURE rushes past the paint tube and syphons the paint out via VENTURI vacuum principle. The paint is dispersed by the force of the pressure being released literally yanking it out of the tube.

Where HVLP does have better "mist" reduction properties, the liquid (paint) must be thin enough to be dispersed by the volume of air. LVHP on the other hand, uses the rush of the pressure in the air stream to literally suck the paint out of the paint supply tube (venturi).

Where HVLP doesn't atomize the paint into tiny droplets of paint, LVHP does. This is where the "mist" associated with painting comes from. This is also the cause of paint dust everywhere after a paint job, and the biggest reason for requiring a steady stream of filtered air INTO the paint booth and extensive filtering of the air OUT of the paint booth.

HVLP on the other hand, uses larger droplets and lower pressures to coat the car. These larger droplets are less prone to staying in the air as "mist".

This is a very simple explanation, but as I've said, my experience with HVLP is minimal; please chime in with your explanation.

============

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ok HVLP guys chime in here!!! Alos has anyone tried to "Seal" the gap on the rear bumper filler panel where it meets the body, the panel that is welded to the body. prob has close to an 1/4" gap, if so what material did you use! E6000,seam sealer? I am actually having a blast doing this!

Don

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Don;

I know you have a 77 280 "shaved" but could you post a picture of the panel you're referring to?

If it's the one I'm thinking of, and I may be wrong, you're referring to literally a "shelf" of metal that protrudes straight out from the body and either goes under or meets the bumper. (Again, if I recall correctly.) If so, the biggest problem you'll encounter is that what you use will be very much determined by how much vibration that part gets during normal driving.

While there are various compounds that work very well on other surfaces, when used in seams where two panels meet and vibrate out of sync with each other, you're going to have cracks develop in most filler materials. Your best bet may be to either braze or lead that seam if you truly want a seamless look.

FWIW

E

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E this is the yellow one, not gonna be shaved it is the panel in this pic that goes between the bumper (Chrome) and the body!

post-7742-1415079973041_thumb.jpg

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I belive thats called the sight shield. I left the gap after removing and welding to repair rust so no moisture collects where it meets the body.

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