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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/30/2021 in all areas

  1. Ordered a set of extractors from Les Collins racing here in oz. apparently these work with Weber’s and Hitachi SUs. Stock heatshield and SU return springs requires modifications. Lovely craftsmanship however was let down by some surface imperfections during ceramic coating and a few dents in the secondaries, he is sending me a new set of secondaries.
    4 points
  2. Certainly have some work ahead Ryan. Soon you can nickname the car Patches. You'll learn a lot, have an awesome and intimate experience with the car, your wife will become jealous of it, your offspring will wonder who that strange man is that comes around once in a while. It'll be fine. Cheers mate!
    3 points
  3. The wheel rim is a type of resin that has wood fibers impregnated. A good way to clean it is a soapy solution in the kitchen sink and VERY GENTLY rub it down with a fine steel wool. You don't want to damage or remove the wood fibers. Strip the spokes and hub to bare metal and finish out as @Patcon mentioned.
    3 points
  4. Since there is still a lot of stuff about these not known exactly and many confusing topics, thousand of pages and myths, I will try here to make it easier. If anyone has additional information or something is not right, please post, then I will modify the 1 post. This is for stock factory transmissions only, NOT competition ones. There are A, B and C types transmissions ( C was never used in Z cars so I will not add these here ) Update 9/7-21 : Also the 4.11 ratio R180 was not used on Z cars ( correct me if I am wrong ) Also not sure if 3.90 was used in the USA on the 260/280Z and ZX So far I have: Nissan S30 Fairlady Z Japan till 1978: F4W71A manual F4W71B manual FS5C71A manual FS5C71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71A 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.36 / 3.54 / 3.90 240Z: Datsun 240Z USA and Canada F4W71A manual F4W71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71A 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.36 / 3.54 Datsun 240Z Europe, UK, rest of the world FS5C71A manual FS5C71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71A 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.54 / 3.90 260Z: Datsun 260Z USA and Canada F4W71B manual FS5W71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.36 / 3.54 / 3.90 Datsun 260Z Europe, UK, rest of the world FS5C71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180/R200 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.54 / 3.90 280Z: Datsun 280Z USA and Canada F4W71B manual FS5W71B manual 3 speed automatic 3N71B R180/R200 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.36 / 3.54 / 3.70 / 3.90 ----- ------ ----- ------ ----- ----- 280ZX: Datsun 280ZX USA and Canada F4W71B manual FS5W71B manual 5 speed Borg Warner T5 3 speed automatic Jatco 3N71B R180/R200 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.36 / 3.54 / 3.90 Datsun 280ZX Europe,UK, rest of the world FS5W71B manual 5 speed Borg Warner T5 3 speed automatic Jatco 3N71B R180/R200 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.54 / 3.70 / 3.90 Nissan S130 Fairlady Z Japan: FS5W71B manual 5 speed Borg Warner T5 3 speed automatic Jatco 3N71B R180/R200 Differential, possible gear ratios available: 3.54 / 3.70 / 3.90
    2 points
  5. I think that Carl Beck has a pretty good description on his zhome site. I'll see if I can find it. You can't generalize by just the type of car. You have to go by year. Here are four examples. 1976 USA/Canada 280Z FSM 1978 USA/Canada 280Z FSM 1979 USA/Canada 280ZX FSM 1981 USA/Canada FSM
    2 points
  6. I had posted this previously in the thread but here’s another pic of the APS unit. I didn’t buy 2, shared freight with another guy in oz.
    2 points
  7. Isnt that what makes a politician!
    2 points
  8. We're teaching how to wire a fish. It's complicated.
    2 points
  9. I’ve been a bit slack with updates of late, more because it is demoralizing how slow progress is lol front section of the rotisserie finally complete and I can move onto the rear of the car, mounts should be much quicker to make on the rear new mount design all welded up, added further support to the main L shaped section which will be taking the weight. added supports to uprights should be well and truly strong enough and here is part 1 of the rotisserie build in video, measurements of all sections laid out in the video. Ryan
    2 points
  10. Kinda reminds me of: Give a man a fish vs Teach a man to fish. The FSM wiring pages, aside from persisting errors, are really good - but only if you understand the symbology and how the components SHOULD function.
    2 points
  11. That's an excellent piece of work. The shape of the OE lower rear valence is interesting. It's not uniform and when I first looked at the one on my 70 Z, I thought it had been tweaked from collision damage. The proprietor of APS is a gifted metal shaper. His inventory of offerings seems guided as much by the challenge of creating a new piece vs. the marketabilty of that piece once done. Apparently he compensates in his pricing (which is probably quite fair). Perhaps you should ask him if he's interested in recreating the entire rear panel. BTW, APS is based in the east Yorkshire market town of Thirsk -- the centre of the world of the well-known BBC TV series, 'All Creatures Great and Small', and its lead character, animal veterinarian 'James Herriott' (real name, James Alf Wight). It's a beautiful area and well worth a visit if you're in England. I passed through a couple of years ago as part of a combined Goodwood Revival/Yorkshire Dales vacation.
    1 point
  12. Hahahaha I showed my wife this message and she had a good giggle lol
    1 point
  13. Meh. Even I don't believe much of what I say. 😉
    1 point
  14. That's really unfortunate! Look on my build thread. I took this apart over the last couple of years... Some of that metal is pretty stout! It almost looks like poorly repaired crash damage with holes that allowed rust formation. I dont know who offers the best rear valance these days. A good donor would be my first choice. Especially if you can get the whole panel. Its one piece from the bottom, up around the lights to under the hatch slam panel. A 100 or so spot welds 😉
    1 point
  15. Yes, there is an "on-purpose" restriction on the end of the return side of the fuel rail right where it transitions to the rubber hose (over by the fuel pump). It's a swaged down tip brazed onto the end of the return leg. I've got all kinds of pics of all kinds of carb stuff, and I can't find a single detailed pic of that orifice restrictor. So, all I've got is this: I'll take a look to see if I have any 240/260 fuel rail stuff around here. Not sure I do, but I'll look.
    1 point
  16. In the START position, the G/W wire goes through the tachometer and comes out B/W. The B/W wire goes to the positive on the coil. In the ON position, the B/W wire goes to the ballast resistor and comes out G/W. The G/W wire goes through the tachometer and comes out B/W (different B/W wire than at the switch). The B/W wire goes to the positive on the coil. The B/W wire from the ignition switch (ON position) branches off to a few different functions. The most important one is going to the fuse box. Downstream of the 20A fuse it powers the turn signals, tachometer, brake warning light, and switched source for the alternator/voltage regulator. (Note: for some of these circuits, the wire is Green, but it came from the same source.) Before the fuse box, there is also a branch off the B/W wire that is Green. It goes through an inline fuse and comes out Green. That is for the electric fuel pump. It might have been re-routed for the Nissan modification that actually installed an electric fuel pump in the North American 240Zs. (Long story...) The B/W wire also provides power for a couple of emissions related circuits, but I'm guessing you or a previous owner have defeated and/or removed most of that. For the 240Z, the black wire off the coil is grounded by the points when they collapse.
    1 point
  17. Deleted some wrongness. I would just use the R, B, S, and IG to decide what to use to power your Haltech and parts. Believe Steve. That would be a great political slogan...
    1 point
  18. After completing the front section I moved straight on building the rear mounts. As I was working out what sized tubing to use for the direct mount, I noticed the rear bumper mounts were not flat. There was a few small rust bubbles around the mounts and along the rear valance. So I though I would begin a investigatory expedition into their origin. UH OH😬 well it didn’t come out as polite as that... my exclamation rhymed with DUCK, except with PH on the front.... the bog (you call it filler) monster had reared its ugly head... not knowing if this was from accident damage, which I didn’t think it was, as behind the valance looked undamaged. Or if it was bad rust repairs I decided to press on with my expedition BIG UH OH! Again not the phrase I used... At this point, the suspense to find out just how PH$#*€D my rear valance is was killing me. So I kept going.... At this point I felt I could not continue with the rotisserie build until this was repaired. The massive holes I feel would affect the structural integrity of the rear end. Plus I’ve kind of been dying to sink my teeth into some rust repairs. Ryan
    1 point
  19. Fish come from the grocery store! Teach a man to fish? So I have to grow my own ketchup?
    1 point
  20. If I remember correctly, there's a reducer (restricto) in the return line. Nothing there to go bad but it could become plugged or corroded. I believe C.O. is the one who looked into this previously.
    1 point
  21. I always forget about the 260s and my lack of knowledge about them. I don't think I've ever even seen one in the "wild". Just at ZCON and on the internet.
    1 point
  22. 4.5 psi is pushing the limit on fuel pressure for carbs. 3.5 psi is better and will supply the engine with more than enough fuel.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. I'm having a hard time reconciling these two statements: About the only way to get fuel to pour out of the carb mouth is for the float bowls to overflow. So if the float levels are withing spec, I'm having trouble correlating that to fuel coming out of the front of the carbs. Are you saying that you have checked the bowl levels right WHEN the problem is occurring and they are in spec? Even while there is gas pouring out of the carb mouths?
    1 point
  25. I think anything in the $2-300 range is good
    1 point
  26. I am a structures mechanic. Anything that is part of the airframe is what I (we) work on. As aerospace machinists our job is to fit and assemble commercial jet airliners, freighters and tankers (for the military). So far I have been part of the manufacture of the Boeing 777 (wings and fuselage), 777X (fuselage), and the 767 freighter and its derivative the KC-46 tanker (fuselage). The airplanes are assembled in huge jigs, we call them “the tool”. The 777 wing assembly jig is huge, 4 stories tall, with a footprint larger than an American football field. 4 pairs of wings are assembled simultaneously. So the machinists are working “in the tool”. The wing spars are also assembled in a tool, about 60 feet wide and 120 feet long. The 767, 747 body sections are assembled into larger sub assemblies in large 4 story high tools, similar to the wing assembly tools. The legacy 777 (metal wings) was assembled in a similar tool, which was removed and replaced by crawlers for a “moving” assembly line to also build the 777X. After the wings and fuselage sections are complete they get joined at wing/body join, then final body join. At each step the various pieces are loaded into the tooling, positioned using indexes and checked with lasers to the nearest 0.001”. Still, when an airplane is complete, due to manufacturing tolerances, each one is different in length. I’ve read that a 747 can vary in length by as much as 18”. So I suppose that none of them are perfectly straight, but all modern airplanes have provisions to trim, or adjust the airplane for straight and level flight. The engines are manufactured elsewhere, and installed on the airplane by engine technicians who specialize in the hookup and installation of the engines.
    1 point
  27. PS. Comparison to stock ... and, of course, MORE LASERS! ?
    1 point

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