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240ZMan

Vibrating shifter

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Whenever I get over 5k revs at WOT on my 73 240 the shifter begins to vibrate enough to make a loud sort of buzzing noise. I recall someone saying that this was due to the shifter bushings being worn, but before I change them I wanted to hear what others thought.

Daniel

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I see the parts in the Motorsport catalog, but it doesn't say what material they are made of. Any suggestions where to get brass?

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There used to be a write up on Zhome.com on how to make them, I've never seen them sold, myself.

The OEM ones are plastic, they last for quite a few years, say 3 to 5 minimum in my experience.

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Originally posted by BambiKiller240

The OEM ones are plastic, they last for quite a few years, say 3 to 5 minimum in my experience.

That should be long enough. By then I should (had better!) have a 5 speed in.:D

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yes they are made of a clear plastic , and go in quite easily , if you can get them from nissan you have to buy in set of 5 , ended up selling the rest of mine on ebay , where can you get the brass ones?:geek:

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On the end of a tap is the short answer. I made mine using the brass bit from the middle of a tap, its just slightly oversize, you turn it down on a lathe, and press it in, totally slop free gearchange. However in the US I believe you guys have it easy, there is some model car that uses the same/aaproriate size brass bushes in its door hinges, and for three odd dollars, you can get brass bushes, cant remember what the car was though.

Happy hunting

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Odds are it is the plastics are worn BUT, through the years I have had that problem be a worn shift knob! If I remove it from the shifter the noise is gone. its like the metal insert comes loose from the wood and increases the volume. Easy enough to test. You should also order the three rubber pieces that seal the tranny from the inside of the car. Yours is no doubt rotten and it will help keep out exhaust this winter.

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Interesting comment about the shifter knob. That is where the sound seems to originate, although mine is not wood but leather instead. I plan to change the bushings anyway as I'm sure after 30 years and 200k+ miles they need some help. That may result in less vibration of the shifter and hence less noise from the knob, or at least that's my thinking for the moment.

I have a new rubber boot under the leather shifter boot. But you mentioned "three rubber pieces". What/where are the other 2?

Thanks.

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I only know of two rubber pieces there. One seals the actual opening in the transmission where the shifter mounts (it is round), the other seals the transmission tunnel itself. The only other thing there is the interior boot (a vinyl boot mounted to the console)

Here's a picture from an eBay auction. It shows the two rubber pieces and the holddown ring for the trans tunnel piece, and a shift knob.

PS The shift knob usually loosens due to the vibrations caused by worn/damaged shifter bushings. If the insert looens much the knob will fall off in your hand.

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You can get the bushings and rubber seals from Chloe at MidwestZ. I have two sets coming - one for my new 280 (the shifter is quite loose and sloppy), and one for the 5 speed coming out of my 280 parts car that will go in my 240. Note that when I took the shifter out of the parts car, there were no bushings! Chloe says that the trannys "eat them". I suspect that's what I'll find in the new 280 as well.

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Originally posted by mdbrandy

Chloe says that the trannys "eat them". I suspect that's what I'll find in the new 280 as well.

Yes, as they get broken apart by shifting action over the years, the pieces fall into the transmission and either get ground up or fall to the bottom of the case. When I have drained transmissions (hot) I have seen small chunks of bushing in the drain pan.

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1. take the center console out

2. take both of the rubber boots off of the shifter

3. carefully remove the c-clip on the pin holding the shifter in the tranny

4. pull the pin holding the shifter out

The shifter should pull straight up and out after those steps.

5. install new bushings in the shifter, not the transmission tabs

6. then put it back together.

Thats how I did it on my 260z. I have never done shifter bushings on a 240z but I would imagine the steps are very similar, if not identical to the 260z.

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Daniel,

Here is a write up I did for our NWZ club members. I can't take credit for this bushing upgrade - I read about it somewhere and did the upgrade on my 1972 Z.

REPLACING WORN SHIFTER BUSHINGS

The bushings I used were automotive door hinge bushings. The kit is made by HELP!, and the kit that you want is #38377. It will work on all Z four and five speed shifters from 1970 through 1983 (not including the BW T5). I bought my kit at Baxter's Automotive. They had to order it from downtown - however, I had it that same afternoon. I would call and see if they have it in stock. If not, they'll get it in for you. List price was $4.95.

I lubed the bushings and shifter hole with white lithium grease, then used a vise to press the bushings into the shifter cross pin hole. Next, I put a little lithium grease into the bushings and on the pin, then I worked the pin in and out a few times. It gives a very snug fit with no bushing/pin sloppiness at all. There will be a small void between the two bushings. I filled that with grease for ongoing lubrication.

When I put the shifter lever back into the tranny "ears", it was a little too tight. So I took a sheet of very fine sandpaper and laid it flat on my work bench. Then I rubbed the flat sides of the bushings in a circular motion for a few seconds (we're talking just a thousandth or two here). Then the lever slipped right into the tranny ears without problem. The whole process took about fifteen minutes - a piece of cake.

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Thank you guys so much, you guys are soooo helpfull, really appreciated. I am going to get busy this week end, thanks agian

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