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I'm working on modifying my steering column to have power assist, one of the things that needs to be addressed is how the modified column attaches to the steering rack. There are some people that use a Woodward UA113109 coupler at the steering rack then replace entire OEM steering coupler from the rack to the column with a 3/4 DD rod that connects to a Saturn Vue collapsible coupler. 

I think that its a good approach to go that way, you have a collapsible section for the steering, in the event of a front impact that does not crush you inside the tin can, you might not get impaled.... But doing so will remove the beloved rubber/poly/solid puck from the steering coupler.

So the question is why is there a puck in the OEM setup? I was thinking that perhaps its there to allow for adjustment between the output of the steering column and the steering coupler, and to provide a cheap way to connect them together. Interestingly the OEM Saturn Setup does not have a puck between them, and I dont think I've seen it on other modern cars.....

IIRC the OEM rubber pucks are NLA so we only have poly (energy suspension) and metal (T3) as replacement options has anyone used these? I think the setup that I have planned would have a similar coupler style (less play)....

 

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19 minutes ago, heyitsrama said:

So the question is why is there a puck in the OEM setup? I was thinking that perhaps its there to allow for adjustment between the output of the steering column and the steering coupler, and to provide a cheap way to connect them together. Interestingly the OEM Saturn Setup does not have a puck between them, and I dont think I've seen it on other modern cars.....

My guess is that it was put there to serve as a means of dampening excessive vibration and/or part of the collapsible steering wheel assembly for US crash safety requirement of the period.

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I've always thought it was to lessen a rough and shaky steering wheel, a shock absorber, plus a quicker way to remove the steering rod. 

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