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texasz

Rear Wheel Cylinder Question

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    What is the REAL difference between the OEM Nissan rear wheel cylinder that places like MSA, Z Car Source, and Z Car Depot sell for $260-325 and the aftermarket ones that these same places as well as others sell for $50-70?  Is the OEM Nissan unit REALLY better?  Better enough to command that much more money for them???

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    The rears have their connections opposite. You have to bend the hardlines around some but they will work.

    When I did mine simply swapping sides made for a lot less bending. Driver's side fits closer on the passenger's side and vs/versus. 

    Let me splain that better...

    The cheaper ones are at a different angle than the OEs.

    Look at the pictures and you'll see. I made them work and that's about all that needs to be said. LOL

     

    Edited by siteunseen
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    The expensive ones are for the early cars and the cheap ones are the superseded part for later cars.

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    @26th-Z, so does that mean that owning a 1970 I'm stuck with my only replacement option being the very expensive OEM Nissan units?

    Edited by texasz

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    The spendy ones are probably what you need for car show judging if you want to get maximum points. 

    But as site said, you can make the inexpensive ones work just fine. Just bend your own lines.  It's actually pretty easy, and you can buy pre-fitted lines at the parts store if you need them.

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    I'm not sure the desired question is being answered...

    @texasz,  Has your question been answered, or is the question a more general one:  "Why do aftermarket parts cost so much less than genuine OEM dealer parts? Are the dealer parts really that much better to deserve such a premium price?"

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    I just did this job on mine with RockAuto parts and they fitted without issue. What really baked my noodle was that the ones in the car were 15/16ths, yet the MSA ones are 3/4 and the RA ones are 7/8ths and/or 3/4. I could not for the life of me find 15/16ths made for the S30 but noticed that most made for other cars have the same shape and bike centres. I just went 7/8ths in the end.

    Make sure you end up with the correct type for your car.

    I had absolutely zero issues with fit while using the cheaper ones from RA though.

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    So is the real difference between the proper ones for the early cars and the ones that can be made to work from the later cars a difference in the location of the brake line attachment?  Is that why a new brake line needs to be installed? 

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    You'd have to know where they were manufactured, to be sure.  Not where they're sold.

    Edited by Zed Head

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    So is the real difference between the proper ones for the early cars and the ones that can be made to work from the later cars a difference in the location of the brake line attachment?  Is that why a new brake line needs to be installed? 

     

    Or makes some yourself at a fraction of the cost!!

    ;) I didn’t have to remake mine due to the new cylinders, I did as the PO had used copper! These are cupronickel.

     

    It took under an hour to make and that was mostly me being numb and making them wrong to start with! ;)

     

    25ft pipe £15

    Pipe Flaring kit £14

    Pipe bender I already had £10

    50 x brake line fittings £10

     

    473f27cce1352f2b0db57d2d5e5f5e43.jpg&key=ce9b7c27c19b71ffe230fad7b80b07f48128ec679647a4dec105ab1b86ed45df

     

    Also remade all the copper brake lines at the front of the car too, saved a small fortune and have safe brakes again!

     

    459c762ce4146923fbe3d3d3b713e016.jpg&key=f2caf63b8ec64e16eaeb81ef2d43b8213ef075e65dc88a15f7361264e4a65068dd32f8df7def85c304960e4781bec303.jpg&key=04c71a36d32a6056ae5acc841fd3e11ae998c12a67dbb986d94ab412bda65dd4

     

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    I just checked Rockauto and both brands they carry are out of stock.  😞

     

    Anyone got part numbers of ones that will work?  I can search around for them that way.

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    29 minutes ago, jfa.series1 said:

    Check these out on ebay: Dorman W96879 (R) & Dorman W96878 (L), say they fit the 72-73 models.

    Thank you @jfa.series1, have you used these on your 240Z?

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    The thread doesn't really directly answer the question of "will 1972 (cheap) wheel cylinders work on a 71 (expensive) car?"  I think that that's the real question, and if I process the responses it seems that the answer is yes.

    Are you just trying to get your car back on the road, inexpensively, or are you doing a restoration?  You asked about value but value depends on what the goal is.  And you're asking about what will "work" but it's still not clear if you're okay with bending the lines.

    These should work, below, if you bend the lines, I think.  And you can buy prefitted line at the store so you don't have to flare your own.  Sometimes we get so caught up in the internet we forget about the parts store down the road.

    https://www.oreillyauto.com/shop/b/brake-systems-16456/brake-hydraulics-16513/wheel-cylinder-11318/5020ef8206ed/1972/nissan/240z?q=wheel+cylinder

    image.png

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    15 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

    The thread doesn't really directly answer the question of "will 1972 (cheap) wheel cylinders work on a 71 (expensive) car?"  I think that that's the real question, and if I process the responses it seems that the answer is yes.

    Are you just trying to get your car back on the road, inexpensively, or are you doing a restoration?  You asked about value but value depends on what the goal is.  And you're asking about what will "work" but it's still not clear if you're okay with bending the lines.

    These should work, below, if you bend the lines, I think.  And you can buy prefitted line at the store so you don't have to flare your own.  Sometimes we get so caught up in the internet we forget about the parts store down the road.

    https://www.oreillyauto.com/shop/b/brake-systems-16456/brake-hydraulics-16513/wheel-cylinder-11318/5020ef8206ed/1972/nissan/240z?q=wheel+cylinder

     

    Fair questions and excellent points @Zed Head.  To clarify, I'm alright with these not being "original" though I do not want it to be janky and forced to work because I'm being cheap (I hope that makes sense).  Nor would I want it to be a safety issue because it is not the right (functionally)  part.

     

    One thing that may impact some of the discussion on the lines is that I've been planning on installing some braided steel hoses.  I'm not sure if that replaces the hard lines you are talking about or not.  Does anyone know this?

     

    The two parts you listed have nearly the exact same part number as what jfa.series1 listed...W96879 vs WC96879 and W96878 vs WC96879.

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    I think that if you did a poll, asking who would just buy the parts store cylinders and make them work, versus the extra $200 per side to be 100% correct, most of us would say head to OReilly and save.  Worst case, you get a leaker but get it replaced for free.

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    I used the ones from o'Reillys.

    The SS hoses won't have any effect on wheel cylinders. They are for connecting the hardlines to each other. One from up front under the length of the car to the ones of the wheel assembly. They are for the movement of the strut's up and down. @w3wilkes used the cheaper ones with good outcome on his '71 by bending the short hardline at the wheel.

     

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    @siteunseen, that's some great info you linked to...especially the pictures and first hand experience of swapping the hard lines from one side to the other.  

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