Av8ferg

5 Speed Transmission inspection and possible rebuild.

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    2 hours ago, Av8ferg said:

    I have it in a safe place, where my kids can’t find and lose

    Haha!! Good thinking!   :victorious:

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    BTW, I might hold off on buying that Omega Bushing that EuroDat had in the parts list. I don’t see how it’s a problem. Am I missing something? I put the rear housing back on after calling a transmission repair shop. The guy said do a test fit see if there is play? Noting even touches this bushing as far as I can see. What have I missed? He said he can replace it but to see first is there is play and unless I’m missing another part that comes in the other side I can’t tell if this is required or not. I feel like an idiot. The transmission idea was beyond my pay grade. I just want it to go away with minimal risk. I tried hammering it how using a socket that fit right on the bushing lip. Didn’t budge and I didn’t want to mushroom to end of the bushing so I stopped.
    See pic.
    274887b6d624e2f2ade8864a79e6db94.jpg
    69cae71e10c41cd7a5f335dd8a428b43.jpg


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    its play in the drive shaft to bush you want to look for

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    I recall it being kinda scary getting it out. understand the fear factor. Did you decide what you are going to do about the remaining bearing shield? Your shop guy may be the way to go. on the bushing removal you need a socket that fits well. A press would be better to avoid mushrooming, but IIRC I was able to hammer it (scared while doing).

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    Sneek into a harbor freight with it and the socket, demo the press to yourself (if anyone ask), and bingo, done.

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    ah my video reminds me of using the cool heat process to help with removal as well

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    Nice explanation Dave.  What BTW is “Coal Juice, you refer too?  I think I can do this.  So you heated the flange before trying to tap it out?   How hard we you wailing on this before it started moving?  I guess this a the prudent thing to do.  I’ll try not to Jerry Lewis the hell-out of this thing.  Once you start you’re committed....no going back.  Did you get the same omega Bush that EuroDat had mentioned? 

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    Slip the slip yoke in to the end of the transmission and wiggle it around.  You should also check the slip yoke surface for wear, it can get grooved if somebody let the seal wear out.  I haven't seen a spec for play, I think it's kind of a gut feel thing.

    It will feel looser without the seal in place.

    image.png

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    I don't have a yoke available.  Its in the car.  I guess I'll just roll the dice and try not to screw this up and follow Dave WM.   Also, I'm going to leave that other side of the bearing in.   When the transmission blows up driving to Nashville going over the mountains (if that ZCon happens), I'll then have time to reflect on my decisions I made today.  

     

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    Some of the transmissions we've seen on the site have been incredibly damaged inside.  Often the owner didn't even know until they changed the fluid and found a collection of metal parts on the magnet.  A failed transmission is almost unheard of.  They die very very slowly.

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    On 5/26/2020 at 9:21 PM, EuroDat said:

    The rear yoke bearing (sleeve) doesn't look that good. You can check the play by insert the propeller shaft yoke and check clearance with a feeler guage.

    You can buy them. See my list for the part number. Nissan never did sell them. You had to buy the complete rear extension housing.

    To check the play in that bush just use you propeller shaft (tailshaft for some poeple). Insert the yoke until the it lines up to where the seal was rubbing on the yoke. Generally recognisable by a shinny ring area around the yoke.

    That is important, if you push the yoke all the way in, the wear section will not line up with the bush. If it is on a new section where the bush wasn't rubbing, it will have less clearance and seem ok.

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    coal = cold,  the canned air you buy for dusting off computers. Its really like form of Freon, invert can to get liquid not air, the liquid will evap and get the item very cold.

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    1 hour ago, Av8ferg said:

    Nice explanation Dave.  What BTW is “Coal Juice, you refer too?  I think I can do this.  So you heated the flange before trying to tap it out?   How hard we you wailing on this before it started moving?  I guess this a the prudent thing to do.  I’ll try not to Jerry Lewis the hell-out of this thing.  Once you start you’re committed....no going back.  Did you get the same omega Bush that EuroDat had mentioned? 

    its been a while, I honesty just cant recall (old timers) but it was a BFH as you can see, and with that you let the weight do most of the work, so really just mildly hard taps. Def heat up outside and cool of inside 1st. It worked for me so I presume it will work for others. Clearly once you get it started your confidence will go up as you know its moving and the socket self guides. I press would prob be a better choice, I don't know why I did not use one at the time (perhaps did not have it, or too lazy to set up).

    the key to the heat cool is to it quickly so have everything ready, heat up the alum housing get it good and warm (don't melt the alum, keep in moving I would shoot for about 250f max if you have a way to tell) then invert the can soak down the inside bush all around (it will frost over instantly) and immediately go to work with the socket. if nothing hit it again with the cold stuff. You only have seconds before the temps will equalize as the alum is a very good heat conductor. I am just assuming this helps the process, I know it worked for me. could prob do with out if a press was used.

     

    Edited by Dave WM

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    oh and can not overstate the importance of getting that hole in the bush lined up with the oil galley. With out it you have a dry bushing. Its easy for the bush to get misaligned as you start driving it in (again with the hammer) as it can bounce just a bit on the 1st couple whacks and then you are out of alignment. Just keep an eye on it for the starting position on the install.

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    I pulled mine out and pulled the new bush back using the a "tool" I made.

    The "tools" I used:

    A block of 4x2 hardwood (not pine) with a hole drilled through it for a M12 bolt. 1" socket (outside diameter was 24mm) with 1/2" drive so M12 bolt would fit through it. M12 bolt 200mm long with full thread and nut and washers. Can also use thread rod with two nuts. 

    Assembly: assemble the m12 bolt, washer and socket and insert through bush out the rear of extension housing. Fit the block of wood a washer and nut and tighten it until firm. Heat the housing until warm to touch. Start extracting bush by tightening bolt.

    It took me about 20 minutes to make it and replace the bush.

    You mentioned ordering the front and rear seal kit from zcardepot. Did you order the other seals from them. Speedo o-ring and lip seal, selector seals and reverse lock out o-ring. I don't see the selector seals and reverse lock out on their site, but you can buy them at any hydraulics supplier.

    It would be advisable to replace the shifter bushings. They have the original kit.

    https://zcardepot.com/collections/driveline/products/shifter-bushing-kit-oem-240z-260z-280z-280zx

    Some people use the brass bushes, but there are positives and negatives to using brass. Positive: It wears a lot less and doesn't require replacing as often. Negative: Brass requires lubrication and to reduce rear. Once they wear they can clatter due to small vibrations in the drive line. I prefer the originals, but that is my prefference.

    Edited by EuroDat

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    ditto on orig plastic bushings,  replaced them years ago (4/5) working great. don't see the need for brass.

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    EuroDat, genius approach to pulling that bushing.  Let me get this straight.  The socket 24mm exterior diameter coincides with the busing diameter. Slip the M12 bolt through the socket and fit it inside the 1/2”drive portion so it cannot spin.  Insert the socket (w bolt) in side the casing until the threads of the M12 sticks out the rear seal area of housing.  Put the thread through the hardwood 2x4 with washer and nut on opposite side.  Slowly tighten nut which pulls the bushing out.  How do you keep the socket from spinning or is there enough friction to overcome that as you tighten.  Pretty smart!!!    I like this better that hammering.  
     

    I thought about those shifter bushings.  Thought the brass was the way to go but it’s sounds like that might not be the case.  
    Copy all on those other 3 seals.  I’ll get them coming, 

    Thanks !!

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    Pretty much what you described. I used a 19mm socket with all my extensions (6" & 12") on the inside to stop the bolt from turning.

    I also had to cut a "C" section out of the wood to make room from the old bush to come out.

    I pulled the old one out with only warming the housing with a heat gun. Once it cracked loose, it slid out easy. The new bush was in the freezer overnight. Warmed the housing again to about 60 degrees C, rubbed a bit of oil in the housing and pulled the new bush in. Like Dave mentioned, check the slot for the oil lubrication lines up, otherwise the bush will have a very short life.

    I'll have a dig around in the garage. I think I still have the block of wood and threaded bar in the box of transmission bit and pieces.

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    I found it. It has a M10 threaded bar, but M12 will also pass through the socket.

    If you look at the wood, you can see the indentation from the extension housing. I added the socket to take a photo of the complete setup.

     

    20200601_130401.jpg

    20200601_130411.jpg

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    I would assume the socket would actually be turned the other way to prevent flaring the bushing?

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    Thanks for the clarification and pics, once I get homefrom work  I’ll see what I can come up with.  I appreciate the help!
     

     Patcon, I thought the same thing but I guess it depends how fart that tapered portion of  the socket slips in.  You definitely need the perfect socket for this.  
     

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    4 hours ago, EuroDat said:

    I found it. It has a M10 threaded bar, but M12 will also pass through the socket.

    If you look at the wood, you can see the indentation from the extension housing. I added the socket to take a photo of the complete setup.

    20200601_130401.jpg

     

    This would work in slide-hammer fashion also.

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    The edge of the socket is almost at right angles. I used it this way because it centered easier, but I understand your concern. It would work with the socket the other way around.

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    None of my large sockets have that shoulder on them. That would be really useful sometimes

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