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JDM/option Footrest, differences.

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Today i installed my footrest. It took me a while to figure out the position of the footrest and holes.
It seems the holes measured by @HS30-H above are for the footrests version with two
inward facing L-shaped "Feet" of the footrest. I have the two leftward facing Feet, which i think was introduced a bit later, for whatever reason.
My idea is that because of the missing reinforcement of the floorpans in later versions, they decided to have the holes more towards the transmission tunnel where it would
be a bit more stable and less "rattly" compared to two attachment points in the middle of the floorpan without any adaditional reinforcement. But that's just pure guessing.
At the end, i think i figoured out the position with the Drawings and pictures and measurements and the insulation mat drawings done previously by others (See above).
So thanks all for your input:
DSC_2444-Kopie.jpg

Please ignore the uncleaned welds, i will complete that task soon. here you see the holes from the underside...
DSC_2440-Kopie-rotated.jpg
 

I first thought one of my "feet" was bent by accident or so. But after talking to @RIP260Z, who told me that he had see those bent ones before, and after realizing that the material
is way too thick to just bend it in a such nice way by accident (without cracking the paint in the bending area), i started to mock it all up and then realized that the shape must be like this from factory to follow
the shape of the floor pan in the transmission tunnel area. I'm not sure if this is specially for LHD cars or if it also would fit the same on the other side in RHD cars (where the bent area would
face towards the door and should follow the shape of the floorpans towards the inner rocker panel).
Again, please ignore the welds that need to be cleaned... and note that i left some mm space where the insulation mats and floormats will go later...
DSC_2442-Kopie-1.jpg
 

At the end i had it all installed and with a nice fit, if you ask me, and it looks and feels just right to me.
It looks very "unaligned" in this picture, but first the footrest has a bit of a weird shape from factory, and second it's because of the camera angle...
DSC_2447-Kopie.jpg

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1 hour ago, JDMjunkies.ch said:

My idea is that because of the missing reinforcement of the floorpans in later versions, they decided to have the holes more towards the transmission tunnel where it would be a bit more stable and less "rattly" compared to two attachment points in the middle of the floorpan without any adaditional reinforcement. But that's just pure guessing.

But are you going to add some factory-style doublers to the underside of the mounting holes? It seems like a no-brainer to me. The footrest - in use - exerts quite a lot of leverage force on the floorpan. The factory doublers - with their turned-up edges - beef up the mounting points considerably. I think they are worth the effort of replication.

 

Footrest Mount-1.JPG

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13 minutes ago, HS30-H said:

But are you going to add some factory-style doublers to the underside of the mounting holes? It seems like a no-brainer to me. The footrest - in use - exerts quite a lot of leverage force on the floorpan. The factory doublers - with their turned-up edges - beef up the mounting points considerably. I think they are worth the effort of replication.

Alan, thanks for the detail-photo. I thought it was more of a "Positionining ring" rather than actually beeing a real reinforcement of the floorpans. But with the picture now it looks different.
Now i have to rethink the whole plan. My initial idea was to just use big washers as "reinforcement" to spread the force of the bolt over a bigger area.
On one hand the later cars didn't have these "doublers" from factory, so i guess the idea was to have the footrests installed without those in cars built after 1971 or cars where the footrest was bought later as an option...
On the other hand i can see how this would improve the stability of the floorpans in a nice and factory-looking way.

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Just thinking out loud here...

You could, perhaps, approximate the shape of the lipped doubler plates by finding an appropriately-sized metal bottle and sawing off the bottom (leaving a lip).  The only donor item made from steel that I can think of would be a small propane bottle -- empty, of course!  Not sure about the metal gauge used for these pressurized bottles.  Too thick?  The usual metal drinking bottles (as used by joggers, cyclists, etc) would perhaps be closer to the correct thickness but I think they're made from aluminum, so not easy to weld to the floor pan.

You might be able to make your own by hammer-forming 0.7mm sheet steel over a piece of shaped and contoured hardwood.  The lip could be finished to a uniform height afterwards with a grinder.

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On 11/22/2020 at 3:38 PM, Namerow said:

Just thinking out loud here...

You could, perhaps, approximate the shape of the lipped doubler plates by finding an appropriately-sized metal bottle and sawing off the bottom (leaving a lip).  The only donor item made from steel that I can think of would be a small propane bottle -- empty, of course!  Not sure about the metal gauge used for these pressurized bottles.  Too thick?  The usual metal drinking bottles (as used by joggers, cyclists, etc) would perhaps be closer to the correct thickness but I think they're made from aluminum, so not easy to weld to the floor pan.

You might be able to make your own by hammer-forming 0.7mm sheet steel over a piece of shaped and contoured hardwood.  The lip could be finished to a uniform height afterwards with a grinder.

to be honest i think just hand-making something is probably the easiest way - it's not a really complicated part. if you have a workshop hydraulic press it's even easier i think. I meen even the original item in Alan's picture look really "handmade"

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This might help. From my 1972 JDM Fairlady Z L.

Floors were stripped back and rust patched. Excuse the thin layers of seam sealer. This has since been covered with underbody paint. 

 

 

IMG_20191006_081936831.jpg

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