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Restoration of BringaTrailer 240z - HLS30-35883


inline6

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I've spent a lot of hours scrubbing, scraping, sanding, etc. to remove all of the glue from the inside panels of the car.  Getting it off shock towers, inner rocker panels, roof, hatch openings, luggage riser, firewall, and inside the tool compartments was a job.  I've still got more prep to do before the inside of the car will be ready for paint, but after about 4 Saturdays, I called it 'good enough' to get a layer of epoxy on top of the newly installed sound deadening mats in the passenger compartment.  The hatch area will get the same treatment with epoxy soon.

A video follows, but here are some still shots as well:

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Edited by inline6
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Picking up where I left off, I primed inside the rear hatch area.  In the spare tire well, I only sprayed to cover spots where bare metal was exposed during sanding.  Since the spare tire well and tool door areas will be more visible when all is said and done, I have spent and will spend more time in these areas to make them look factory fresh looking when the car emerges from the paint booth.

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While spraying epoxy primer, I sprayed a few other items including a glass bead blasted tool compartment door (I got the car with one blue and one silver one), the two sand blasted hood hinges, and the insides of the front fenders.  For the fenders, I put seam sealer in some important areas before priming. 

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Edited by inline6
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I've been thinking about how best to address one of the most common rust out areas on our cars, the bottom corner of the front fender.  There is a reinforcement panel which is crimped into the back edge of the fender, and where it twists at the bottom of the fender, it creates a trap for dirt and debris which over time, collects in the bottom rear corner.  The debris which gets trapped here allows no air circulation so it holds moisture for extended periods of time, over and over again.  Eventually, bare metal gets exposed and rust starts.  

Initially, I thought I would address this problem area by cutting some oval vents to allow additional drainage from this corner, and additional air circulation for drying.  However, I think that would only be a slight improvement.  Instead, I now have in mind fabricating a small metal panel which will seal off this area completely, and therefore, not allowing any dirt or debris or moisture to collect in the corner at all.  Here is a cardboard mock up:  

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I will extend the actual metal piece I fabricate a little further down than this cardboard template, so that the gap is closed.  I may pop rivet this piece on using the little tabs.  Once secured, I will use seam sealer to seal all the gaps.  Of course, I now need to do something to seal up the oval holes that I cut into the reinforcement panel, or water and debris will enter there and I will still have the same problem for the bottom inch or so of the fender corner.
 

Edited by inline6
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Interesting idea, I would tack weld the entire piece in place in addition to the seam sealer, aluminum or even SS rivets will corrode at some point. The oval breather holes I would leave open, they are very close to the body in that area. Maybe some oil treatment or cavity wax after the final paint job.

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I was able to fabricate these for both fenders today.  This metal piece is easy to fabricate as it only has one bend.  I decided to tack weld it to the support instead of using pop rivets - thanks grannyknot for the suggestion.  I did not tack it anywhere else though, as the body work is nearly finalized and I am not interested in deforming the outside surface of the fender.  Hopefully, the addition of this piece does not cause a change in the shape of the panel when it is bolted in place. It might.  And more time on bodywork will be the result if it did.  After tacking, I used a hand-held belt sander to clean up the edge and then applied seam sealer.  

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Now, any water coming inside the fender will run down the inside and be directed away from this corner by the shelf of this panel.

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Edited by inline6
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  • 2 weeks later...

Pictures after using the panel bond.  I sprayed the non-bonded surfaces with zinc primer before I bonded the bracket to the outer and inner hatch panels.

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In other news, I finally boxed up the hardware to send it off to be plated.  I called http://www.texasprecision.net/ a few days ago and Steve said they are "not really taking on that kind of work anymore".  I told him I was referred by a couple of other 240z people who recommended them highly, and that I would be happy to wait an extended period of time, if necessary.  He asked about the condition of my parts.  So, I told him that I had done extensive prep and described my process a bit.  I offered to send a few pics, which I have done.  But, I haven't heard anything back yet.  Fingers crossed.   

Edited by inline6
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That's too bad, but not surprising.

It is a big risk for a plater to take on this hobby type plating. If the metal isn't clean you could contaminate his tanks. Which would be very expensive to correct and if the plating doesn't look good, then the customer is unhappy on a really low profit job.

I suspect we will continue to have fewer options for platers.

You might want to post this info in the "platers" thread so its all in one place

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1 hour ago, jfa.series1 said:

That's interesting news about TPP. I picked up an order from them about 3 weeks ago and there was no mention of no longer supporting my hobby level work.

They may make an exception for you Jim. Just because you're you 😉

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1 hour ago, jfa.series1 said:

That's interesting news about TPP. I picked up an order from them about 3 weeks ago and there was no mention of no longer supporting my hobby level work.

He asked if I had them do work for me before, so, I think they are continuing for a few current customers.  Also said something about prioritizing local business/clients.  Anyway, if I have to go elsewhere, I'll be more nervous about it.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/21/2021 at 2:46 PM, Patcon said:

Look up my caswell thread

Enjoyed reading through that.  You got some nice results Patcon.  I have been tempted to do some on my own, but so far have avoided because I don't see enough pros to counter cons for my situation.  Space in my garage is always a factor.  Chemicals that get stored for very long periods of time without use are another big con for me.  Anyway, I wish I could plate a few things here and there.  

Good news for me is that Texas Precision Plating (Steve) said I can send my parts to him and they will plate them.  I am happy about that.  I had boxed most things up already.  Yesterday, I "bent" the hard lines that go through the transmission tunnel (brake, fuel supply, fuel return, and gas tank vent) so they could fit in a box.  I used the gas cylinder from my Mig as a form, and put one ~180 degree bend in each long hard line.  Along with those in a large box, I put a lot of the large parts which are to receive zinc with yellow chromate (gold) packed in their own box.  I have two boxes to ship them.  The other box is just hardware and small parts and comes to 50 lbs! 

Edited by inline6
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3 hours ago, inline6 said:

Enjoyed reading through that.  You got some nice results Patcon.  I have been tempted to do some on my own, but so far have avoided because I don't see enough pros to counter cons for my situation.  Space in my garage is always a factor.  Chemicals that get stored for very long periods of time without use are another big con for me.  Anyway, I wish I could plate a few things here and there.

I agree, there are some cons. I tried to plate something the other day and couldn't get acceptable results. That's what happens when you let things sit. It's also very time consuming to plate unless you have a BIG setup. I have been disappointed by a couple of commercial platers. I'm glad TPP is gonna take your plating. Please update my other thread when you get your hardware back

1 hour ago, DC871F said:

Would the complete nut and bolt set that's offered by Z Depot be correct? 

Not sure going to get that anal on my build, but then again....

It seems like a convieniant route to have nice hardware, if they in fact correct.

The vintage hardware many times looks different from the new stuff. Sometimes the heads are different sizes. Also the vintage hardware have numbers on them "7's" or "9's"

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So, I got all my parts sent out for plating.  $100 in shipping for one box and $146 for the other.  $246 in shipping from GA to TX!!!  F'rs.  

Amazon (for shipping) is going to eat them alive before too much longer - both UPS and FedEx.  

Edited by inline6
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I think I found some Koito headlights like the original ones that came on the car new.  I went ahead and bought them.  I was using this very original 280Z on Bring a Trailer as a reference:  https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1978-datsun-280z-108/

Here are the ones I bought - these sealed beam bulbs look the same: 

Koito Headlights.jpg

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I started a little project to build some frames with wheels assemblies that will allow me to roll the car around easily when it I take it off the rotisserie.  Here are a few pics.  

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Rather than make a body cart, I am going to try to get away with just two assemblies, one for the front and one for the rear.  The front will attach to the front crossmember support bolt holes on the frame of the car.  The rear will attach to the inner control arm pivot areas on the car.  I am also making it so that it has two height positions.  I found some square tubes and rectangular box sections (scraps) at a local metal supply place.  The rectangular box sections are about 55" long and 3" X 1.5".  I sourced U bolts with 3" inside spacing to secure the caster wheels.  U bolts and some pins for setting the height were sourced from McMaster Carr.  I got the wheels from Northern Hydraulic. 

Edited by inline6
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6 minutes ago, Patcon said:

I would want to tie them together with a bar or two, front to back. I would be afraid of tweaking the body mounts if one frame doesn't roll for some reason

Yes. I was looking at it and something wasnt sitting right with what I was seeing.

Nailed it.

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Hmmm.  Maybe I should do that.  I'm not ready to use these, won't be for a while longer.  I'll have to look for suitable "drops" at my local metal store.  Those are the leftover bits that they sell for a single rate by weight. 

Texas Precision Plating got my two shipments ok.  Hope they turn my parts around in the early part of January.  Once I get them back, I can bolt on inner fender supports, the fenders, and the inspection lids for the last time.  Then, I can proceed with the last of the primer coats and final sanding on the fenders.  There are still a few other areas to address with further bodywork, such as an area on the passenger door, and the rear tail panel.  Getting closer to paint! 

While the car is at the paint shop, I plan to Black Diamond blast all of the black parts and prime and paint them.  It would be easier to drop them all off at a powder coater.  But, I figure epoxy primer and paint will be much more durable than the factory's original attempt, but look more authentic. 

I wish all of my efforts, all of this, was for an early VIN car for value reasons, but hey, 240z's in this good of a starting condition are somewhat hard to find.    

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