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wadelester

Rear strut gland nut

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After much work, I can finally hand tighten the gland nut.  I need a pipe wrench for the last couple turns, but it stops at the point int the picture.  Is that correct gap, or should it thighten to the point where the nut is flush?  The nut is tore up, but pipe wrench works.

image.jpg

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wow that is chewed up. If you are using cartridges you should have gotten new ones. and if you do have carts, then it should NOT bottom out

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Thanks @Dave WM I opened the cartridge packing and low and behold there was a new nut.  It still took some work, but I got it to the same point.

i noticed that the new cartridge is a little shorter than what was in there.  Does the gland nut compensate for that or do I need a shim?

thank you again.

Edited by wadelester

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as long as it does not bottom out you will be ok, if it bottoms out then there is a good possibility that the cart is not firmly captured in the strut. I just did mine had maybe a 2 turns left before it would bottom. the extended shaft should have NO lateral play from the cart moving in the strut.

Tip invest in a 24" adjustable wrench, it will have smooth faced jaws. Pipe wrenches are for round steel or cast iron pipe, the jaws are designed to cut into the steel to get a bite. I found the 24" adj to be plenty of power to remove or replace gland nuts on the struts.

Edited by Dave WM

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A wire brush on a drill can help clean up those threads too

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Regarding how tight or close to "all the way in" the nut has to go, what matters is if the nut contacts the strut body top and locks it in place BEFORE the nut bottoms out. Nothing worse than a loose shock cartridge rattling around and driving you crazy. So as long as most of the threads are engaged, and the cartridge is locked in place, you're good. 

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31 minutes ago, Patcon said:

I thought I would add this here.

MSA now sells a gland nut tool. Pretty reasonable and allows torquing

https://www.thezstore.com/page/TZS/PROD/classic07/60-9956

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The MSA Summer Sale email pushed me over the edge.  I just ordered a full set of Koni's and the gland nut tool  Sale price + free shipping + no sales tax.  Rationalization rears it ugly head!

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On 9/7/2019 at 10:52 AM, jfa.series1 said:

The MSA Summer Sale email pushed me over the edge.  I just ordered a full set of Koni's and the gland nut tool  Sale price + free shipping + no sales tax.  Rationalization rears it ugly head!

My wife says it's your fault. I also pulled the trigger on the Koni's along with bushings, insulators. The old "while I'm in there...". MSA is checking one thing and will call in the AM. After reading through this thread I'm thinking it sounds better than the urethane tension rod bushing kit. Thoughts either way??

This will be something to do this winter.

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12 hours ago, w3wilkes said:

My wife says it's your fault. I also pulled the trigger on the Koni's along with bushings, insulators. The old "while I'm in there...". MSA is checking one thing and will call in the AM. After reading through this thread I'm thinking it sounds better than the urethane tension rod bushing kit. Thoughts either way??

This will be something to do this winter.

Oh sure... blame it on the guy down in Texas, he's such a bad influence on everyone!  And, certainly I'm also responsible for the extra purchases as well. :finger:  bad dog!!!

I installed that ball and socket kit many years ago (still have it) when I also swapped out the front control arm bushings for eccentric bushings.  I was doing a lot of autocrossing back then.  The changes did tighten up the front end but at a cost of civility in the everyday drive experience.  The kit came out in favor of rubber T/C bushings when I restoed the car.  I see it as a good option for a track or AX intensive setup.

My work on the shock swap will also wait until a break in the temps - still running mid-to-high 90's here.

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9 minutes ago, jfa.series1 said:

Oh sure... blame it on the guy down in Texas, he's such a bad influence on everyone!  And, certainly I'm also responsible for the extra purchases as well. :finger:  bad dog!!!

I installed that ball and socket kit many years ago (still have it) when I also swapped out the front control arm bushings for eccentric bushings.  I was doing a lot of autocrossing back then.  The changes did tighten up the front end but at a cost of civility in the everyday drive experience.  The kit came out in favor of rubber T/C bushings when I restoed the car.  I see it as a good option for a track or AX intensive setup.

My work on the shock swap will also wait until a break in the temps - still running mid-to-high 90's here.

My thought on the T/C tension rod kit with the rubber bushings is it would be somewhat less harsh than the urethane tension rod bushing kit. Maybe somewhere between stock and the urethane kit??

Sorry for blaming you, I've now taken ownership of my deeds, so you're off the hook!

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5 minutes ago, w3wilkes said:

 

My thought on the T/C tension rod kit with the rubber bushings is it would be somewhat less harsh than the urethane tension rod bushing kit. Maybe somewhere between stock and the urethane kit??

Sorry for blaming you, I've now taken ownership of my deeds, so you're off the hook!

The ball and socket on the front side means there is absolutely zero compliance on the T/C rod moving rearward - every impact will be transmitted to the body.  Urethane bushings will be almost as severe in my opinion.  I suspect they recommend a rubber bushing on the backside to reduce a hard rebound snap pulling forward on the T/C box mount.  The design of the T/C box is oriented to resist rearward forces, not the other direction.  Just  my $0.02 worth.

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Thanks for the 2¢. So my thinking was backwards (not that unusual). The urethane bushing kit will be a little less harsh than the T/C kit. From other reading it sounds like a little less tightening with the urethane bushings will also slightly reduce the harshness of urethane.

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1 hour ago, jfa.series1 said:

 I suspect they recommend a rubber bushing on the backside to reduce a hard rebound snap pulling forward on the T/C box mount.  The design of the T/C box is oriented to resist rearward forces, not the other direction.  

The rod moves up and down at the control arm with the suspension also, so there is a side force on the back/tip of the rod from the bushing, as the bushing restricts the motion. I think that it causes metal fatigue and that's what breaks the T/C rods.  I had urethane on the back of mine for a while and the front end groaned over bumps for a couple of months then the tip of the rod finally broke off.

If a person had some time they could mount just the back of the rod and move the front up and down by hand, just to feel the difference in effort required.  Might be illuminating.

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