Captain Obvious

Complete Misfire on Three Cylinders

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I got a couple hours in the shop today. Here's what I started with. You can't really tell from this pic but that hole goes in on somewhat of an angle. It's not square to the top surface. It cuts in towards the center of the head:
P1150282.JPG

First I bored out the hole (hopefully close to the correct location) to about as large as I was comfortable with. Here you can clearly see the off-center hole that punctured down into the water jacket below:
P1150289.JPG

Then once that was done, I threaded that hole:
P1150291.JPG

And made a threaded insert on the lathe:
P1150297.JPG

Here's a test fit:
P1150298.JPG

I didn't glue the insert in yet. I'll do that tomorrow with a clear head. And then after I glue it in, I'll cut off the excess and machine flat.

 

Edited by Captain Obvious
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I got a couple hours in the shop today. Here's what I started with. You can't really tell from this pic but that hole goes in on somewhat of an angle. It's not square to the top surface. It cuts in towards the center of the head:
P1150282.JPG.c7ca8701736275d3af581e36659bcb26.JPG
First I bored out the hole (hopefully close to the correct location) to about as large as I was comfortable with. Here you can clearly see the off-center hole that punctured down into the water jacket below:
P1150289.JPG.673b547a9729a0c7d744000abab83728.JPG
Then once that was done, I threaded that hole:
P1150291.JPG.5ec3a0c1c08cd1545f79db26d3be37a1.JPG
And made a threaded insert on the lathe:
P1150297.JPG.34ac99fecec125660e2707ea048a6dd5.JPG
Here's a test fit:
P1150298.JPG.c00da3d962431fe025d5028b905edc42.JPG
I didn't glue the insert in yet. I'll do that tomorrow with a clear head. And then after I glue it in, I'll cut off the excess and machine flat.
 

CO, I’m impressed. Nice work. Regarding the ”labor-cost-benefit”, I’d say this is a labor of love. Minds like yours and many on here need these mental and skill challenges. So try and enjoy what it a know afterwards that you’ll sleep well knowing you did it right. The PO didn’t have the luxury.


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Oh, and my donor cam from [mention=7021]jonathanrussell[/mention] arrived today and looks great!
Thanks again for the incredible generosity!!    :beer:
P1150285.JPG.ff08b7d9af78d538cf70e9be12b87cbe.JPG

One of the many great things about this Forum. Most people on here regularly, are on because they love these cars and the camaraderie with the members, not to make a buck or boast and prove their expertise. The pay it forward mentality for the greater good of the members and forum is the prevailing culture.
Jonathonrussell just proved that once again!


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I knew the swarf maker would come up with an elegant solution!

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So no steps backwards today!!!

I made a plug for the other stripped out valve cover hole up by the thermostat housing. That one was a breeze compared to the other one for many reasons. Mainly because the original hole was in the right place, but just stripped out. That and the fact that my PO had not punctured into the water jacket there too. Anyway compared to the one at the rear, this one was way easy.

Red Threadlock on both the plug inserts and screwed them both tight. Here's the smaller, simple one by the thermostat housing:
P1150310.JPG

Give the plugs 24 hours to cure and I'll cut them off and flatten the stubs.

Today I also took the valve seals off and started cleaning the chambers up. First wave done and no real surprises. Couple small gouges from the PO. Probably from slip-oops while cleaning the old head gasket off. Annoying, but I don't think they are going to cause problems.

So, couple steps forward, and no steps back! Much better than the past few days!!

Edited by Captain Obvious
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So here's a question for the collective... This is a pic of one of the plugs in the head from the casting process.

Looks like Teflon tape sealing the plug. Was this factory, or did my PO have these plugs out and use Teflon instead of thread lock? Here's what I got:
P1150320.JPG

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All of the L series heads I have looked at have Teflon looking tape for these plugs. I am not sure though whether it is some sort of special tape that is resistant to oil or simply Teflon tape. I would like to know what others think or know abut this tape.

Edit:

Added photo of my E88 NOS head showing tape.

 

E88 NOS tape (Medium).jpg

Edited by jonathanrussell

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That's good enough for me. If you've seen tape like this on other heads, I'm going to assume it's factory and just let the plugs be as they are.

Thanks for the data point.

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Thanks again guys.

So here's that plug where my PO drilled through into the water jacket. Cut off and now flush:
P1150347.JPG

I'll drill and tap for the valve cover bolt later. Now that I've got good metal to work with, that shouldn't be difficult.

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So here's another question... My PO used stainless studs for the exhaust instead of the original bolts, and some of them are crazy long.

And the positions of the long ones seem almost random. Here's a pic I took during the teardown. There's four super long studs... Three of them easy to see in the pic, and a fourth hidden under the thermostat housing:
P1150153.JPG

Question is... Is there some logical reason for the length and the positioning? He clearly did it on purpose. Any ideas?

I haven't tried to take any of them out (yet). I'm kinda torn between leaving just sleeping dogs lie and poking them. Based on what I've found elsewhere, I'm a little worried that something might be stripped out of the head or (literally) holding on by a thread.

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wow the hits keep on coming. if you decide to remove them and they resist go with heating them, bummer to break one. I Cant see it but is the 1st under the T stat housing still there, that one often breaks. Personally I would pop for some reg OE types if the threads are not buggered up. I also like the kind sold at the auto parts stores, they have a hex head that lets you tighten up with out double nutting or special tools.

Edited by Dave WM

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5 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

Question is... Is there some logical reason for the length and the positioning? He clearly did it on purpose. Any ideas?

I'll bet he did it so that he could replace the intake/exhaust gasket without removing the exhaust manifold, or just to make it easier to install.  Or he got those from the hardware store and that's all they had, and he didn't have a hacksaw handy.

If you decide to replace them beware the odd nut sizes from some of the kits out there.  Some use a 12mm and some use a 13.

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I think I’d probably leave them alone. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Again function over form. If they bother you or you any reservations about the integrity the pull them but you could potentially set yourself back with some broken studs.


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On the other hand, if they are so weak that they can't take a little torque then they'll probably break in use.  The only bolts I've broken are the thermostat housing bolts.  I've has studs that were difficult to remove but I was more worried about pulling the aluminum threads out of the head than breaking the stud.

Beside that, aren't they too tall to clamp?  They don't look fully threaded.  Unless they're made from cut pieces of all-thread.  Did the PO have a stack of washers under the nut?

image.png

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Stainless steel into aluminium - galvanic reaction city. The heat generated while undoing them accelerates the reaction and is what makes them resist even harder. S/S is brittle (unlike tensile steel) and you could regret this one. My vote would be leave it alone.

You are making such superb progress, don’t suffer scope creep and other unforeseen issues now. iMHO of course!

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If he hasn't put a wrench on at least one to try and remove it, it's all conjecture.  There are many grades of SS.  Just don't know enough to say either way.  Has anyone broken a stud when it's free and clear like these?  They break when they're under tension, clamping, but I've never broken one when it was exposed like that.

Good luck CO.  I can't imagine that you'll leave those monstrosities in there after the work you put in to that valve cover bolt hole.  Doing one but not the other doesn't fit inside the same brain.  The manifold clamping is much more important than clamping a valve cover down.  Hence my zip ties joke.

It's been 8 hours, they're probably all out by now...

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For those that have not used one, you can get a 8mm stud remover socket. 

Just put on the end of you extension. They work great. Another good investment I made.

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induction heater tool, great for this stuff. expensive but beats the heck out of having to drill out.

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