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1970 HLS30-06521 Re-Restoration


CanTechZ

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Last weekend prompted by @inline6's topic about preventing rust in Z's lower front fenders I decided to remove mine to do some investigating. here is a link to that thread:

https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/66010-preventing-rust-in-the-zs-lower-front-fenders/#comments

In addition to looking at the fenders, I did this to inspect areas that are hidden by the fenders, like the upper frame rails, AKA air horns, and get a good look at the firewall to frame rail area. And also the inner fender above the T/C box that very common for rust. Yesterday I removed the patches that had been installed on my first resto in 1982. My body guy back then did a quick and dirty job in that area, as I was on a very tight budget being a student, however didn't think it would be as shoddy as I have found. It's still fixable but will be a few more $$$. On the plus side the OE fenders I put on in 1982 are still in great condition. Here are a few pictures of what I found. I must caution you that some of the images are disturbing. Lol

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Last year I purchased a pair of these repair parts for this area from Auto Panel Solutions in the UK,

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However I noticed that KF Vintage JDM now offers a full length repair option for this area that includes the pocket and reinforcement at the crossmember mount, which I need as well. Decisions, decisions?

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https://kfvintagejdm.com/shop/datsun/front-inner-fender-lower-repair-section-6-inches-right-side/

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by CanTechZ
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1 hour ago, 240ZBUILTBYME said:

Ouch mike... 

yes I saw these from KF, going to get them for mine, but your APS ones should be of high quality too. 

dare say your handling might be improved once you add some chassis rigidity! 😜

Thanks Ryan, I definitely agree with you about chassis rigidity I'm sure that whether I go with APS or KF it will make a big difference.

Cheers, Mike

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just received the funky green parts I ordered from Klassic Fab on Black Friday. Thanks to Gerson of @kfvintagejdm, for offering us these awesome parts. They will go a long way to fix the issues in the posts above.

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Here's one more reason why I need them.....

 

 

Edited by CanTechZ
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12 hours ago, CanTechZ said:

Just received the funky green parts I ordered from Klassic Fab on Black Friday. Thanks to Gerson of @kfvintagejdm, for offering us these awesome parts. They will go a long way to fix the issues in the posts above.

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Here's one more reason why I need them.....

 

 

The late Colin Chapman would have referred to this as 'adding lightness'.  So, a good thing 🙂

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  • 1 month later...

I will be sending my shell to the body shop soon, so I have been designing a support frame with casters that I can attach to the bottom of the chassis. I will use this to get the shell onto a deck truck for transport, and to use during the reassembly process. It is similar to what @inline6did, main difference with mine is that it is a fully bolted Unistrut construction, as I have no access to a welder at home.  Here is an image of the final concept.

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This morning I finished doing some pre-assembly, test fits and checks for any missing any hardware. So far it has gone together without issue, kind of like the Meccano set I had as a kid. Here are a few pics,

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I will be completing this project over the weekend, and will post pics with it fully installed.

 

 

 

Edited by CanTechZ
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Kudos for illustrating that -- for certain applications, anyway -- there are choices other than welding.  Reminds me of a friend (also located in BC) who successfully built a rotisserie frame for his 240Z project from wood.

Looking forward to your photos.

Edited by Namerow
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20 hours ago, Namerow said:

Kudos for illustrating that -- for certain applications, anyway -- there are choices other than welding.  Reminds me of a friend (also located in BC) who successfully built a rotisserie frame for his 240Z project from wood.

Looking forward to your photos.

Welding is the typical method for something like this, besides not having a welder, I just wanted to try something different.  Bolted does offer other benefits, like allowing for easy adjustments or reuse for another project.

Great idea your friend had on the wood frame rotisserie, I would like to see a picture of it in use. People tend to work with materials they are comfortable working with.  I wonder if he is a member of the local club I'm part of, the BC Z Car Registry.

Also late yesterday I picked up the caster plates that I had a friend make. This was the only part I had to actually make for this project, I gave them a quick coat of primer last night and did a test fit this morning. My son will be helping me with final assembly tomorrow. I neglected to tell him that part of job was helping me clean up the garage as well. Lol

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Edited by CanTechZ
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  • 3 weeks later...

Yesterday I made and installed four diagonal braces to complete my rolling chassis support. Deb, my better half, has renamed it "The Two Forty A La Carte".

In keeping with my no welding theme, the braces are simple angle iron parts, cut/drilled/formed and then bolted in using Unistrut channel nuts. I don't have much experience making parts like this and it was enjoyable to practice some basic techniques.

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Brace Fab.jpg

Edited by CanTechZ
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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Still waiting for my body guy to complete a project before he can start on my car, so I decided to start the process of paint removal. I had planned to leave this to my body guy but decided to do part of it. After considering sanding or chemical stripper I decided to try razor blading. Using single sided 1.5" wide x .009" thick razor blades and a heat gun, it seems to work quite well and cleanup is very easy. Anyone else tried this method? Here is a short video clip and a few pictures.

 

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Edited by CanTechZ
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13 minutes ago, Mark Maras said:

I tried a large razor blade too. Then I tried a wide Harbor Freight wood chisel. It worked as well as the razor blade but was much easier on my hand.

Thanks Mark. Did you use heat? I mainly have been using the low setting on my heat gun.

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5 hours ago, CanTechZ said:

Thanks Mark. Did you use heat? I mainly have been using the low setting on my heat gun.

 My first layer was spray can flat black. No heat used on that layer, just eye protection. I did use a heat gun and chisels on the base coat as well as stripper on the difficult to scrape areas.

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4 minutes ago, Patcon said:

 I have also found those paint curls can be razor sharp when cooled

Wait. You didn't cut yourself with the razor, but you cut yourself with the paint. Did I understand that correctly?   ROFL

Sorry... I know it's not really a laughing matter. But.

So that adds a new meaning to it when someone says "Wow. That car is really sharp. I like the paint!"    :ph34r:

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3 hours ago, Patcon said:

Yes, they will cut you LOL The older I get, the easier I bleed. Tis merely a flesh wound... 😉

Luckily so far no cuts from paint, and btw I am wearing eye protection, more chance of an injury with that. However I did shave off a strip of lead from the quarter panel to roof joint. Strangely some of the paint chips/strips were sharper.

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Wow.. what a job.. i was glad someone else took over that job from me.. cost me a 1000 euro or so..  and someone else took over the wheel housings for 100 euro a housing... i would not do it for 100euro.. a housing.. would you? (There was a thick layer of anti rust, very hard and dry.)

Paint is a sort of plastic at the end and can be very sharp edged.. Lead is a soft material, not so sharp..

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6 hours ago, dutchzcarguy said:

Wow.. what a job.. i was glad someone else took over that job from me.. cost me a 1000 euro or so..  and someone else took over the wheel housings for 100 euro a housing... i would not do it for 100euro.. a housing.. would you? (There was a thick layer of anti rust, very hard and dry.)

Paint is a sort of plastic at the end and can be very sharp edged.. Lead is a soft material, not so sharp..

Actually I did strip all of the dealer applied heavy tar like undercoating from my wheel wells and the full underside of the car myself, with a scraper. For me the money I save on things I can do myself goes to parts and things that I can't do. I wish the list of things I cant do was shorter. LOL

Yes I agree that lead is very soft as far as metals go, but that little piece I shaved of was surprisingly sharp, especially with the jagged edges.

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Posted (edited)

Continuing with the paint removal today. For others who try this method don't cheap out on the razor blades. I started out using Richard brand made in the USA blades, which work very well and stay sharp for quite a while. Then I used some cheap ones I ordered on amazon, Titan brand made in China. First off they were loose in the holder and and they lost the sharp edge quite fast. I'm back to using the Richard blades.

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Today I've been working on the RH quarter panel. I had the quarters replaced in the early 1980's and even then my local Datsun dealer was not able to get a 70/71 panel, so I had to have my body man weld in a patch to close the vent hole. I found evidence of the repair while doing the paint removal this morning. During the paint removal I found body filler in that area that was up to .10" (2.5mm) thick, but with heat and razor blading the paint and filler came off in one go.

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Here is another video showing removal of paint and filler (glazing putty?) on the LH quarter.

 

Edited by CanTechZ
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