Jump to content

grannyknot

Just what the Doctor ordered. 1977 280z

Recommended Posts

MEK would be the better solvent.  The MEK rub test is an actual coatings test, to assess degree of cure of 2K type coatings.

It's a people-power test but they've tried to make a machine for it.  A look in to the world of paint.

http://www.trl.com/paint_solvent/

https://gardco.com/pages/abrasion/mekrubtest.cfm

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK so I just did the rub test with MEK, the cream coloured coating is definitely 2 part epoxy primer, I rubbed hard and nothing came away on the cloth but the last remnants of the undercoating. Thanks all.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I had no intention on painting this car much less going down to bare metal but... here I am. Someone in the past filled in the antenna hole and drilled another one and then that was filled in as well, so which is the stock hole?  I thought at first it was the front one but I don't remember cutting into the bodyline like that.

 

IMG_1399.JPG

IMG_1400.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am assuming that the 280 location is the same or close to the 240 location

20190108_191916.jpg20190108_191926.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been so busy with the 280 I forgot about this thread, so I got everything down to bare metal, two coats 2k epoxy primer on all surfaces and two coats of undercoat, and now that it's all sealed up I can breath a bit and not have to worry about the coming humidity.

As it was time drop the car off the rotisserie I had a chance to weigh it, this is just the shell,  the only thing left on the car is the vinyl headliner and the 2 rear wheel arch vinyls. 

Now I'm not 100% on this method but I couldn't think of any other way to do it with what I had on hand.  With the car level the rear measurement  was taken with the car hanging from the rotisserie bar that bolts on where the tie down hooks usually are, then jacks were placed under the rear rotisserie bar and the front was weighed hanging from the front rotisserie bar that is bolted to where the bumper shocks attach just in front of the radiator support.

I checked the accuracy of the crane scale by lifting my small anvil which I know is 118 lbs and it was bang on, 

I have to apologize, I forgot to take a pic of the rear measurement but it weighed in at  289 lb, front was 246 lbs

289lbs

246lbs

535lbs minus the 6lbs of the rotisserie bars, is 529 lbs

Someone with better geometry skills than me will have to verify if the method I used is valid.

 

 

IMG_1490.JPG

IMG_1493.JPG

IMG_1499.JPG

IMG_1501.JPG

IMG_1520.JPG

IMG_1525.JPG

IMG_1529.JPG

IMG_1530.JPG

IMG_1531.JPG

IMG_1537.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So a '77 shell weighs 530lbs or there about.  Nice to know that information but now do you happen to know a '72 shell?  That'd be my two cars weight and I'd like to know except I couldn't do what you're doing!  Amazing work Mr Knot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, grannyknot said:

With the car level the rear measurement was taken with the car hanging from the rotisserie bar that bolts on where the tie down hooks usually are, then jacks were placed under the rear rotisserie bar and the front was weighed hanging from the front rotisserie bar that is bolted to where the bumper shocks attach just in front of the radiator support.

I'm not sure I'm understanding your measurement technique exactly correct, but it sounds like it should be pretty close.

My geometry sense tells me that as long as the "pulled up" support point was the same distance from the center of the car as the "pushed up" support point, then the summation total result should be accurate. In other words... If you did all of your pulling and pushing from the same bars that connect to the rotisserie, then I think it works out.

This is really hard to do without drawings.  LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy playing with numbers sometimes (and I know this will drive @Captain Obvious crazy), so:

At 510 lb, the entire S30 unibody would crush down into a block of steel that measures only 12" x 12" x 12" . 

(Which reminds me of the scene from the old James Bond movie, Goldfinger, where the crushed remains of an early-60's Lincoln Continental (an early American unibody) are dropped into the bed of a waiting Ford Ranchero pickup for 'disposal'.  That block was probably about 3 cu.ft. but it included all of the bodywork, interior and glass too.)

The S30 unibody weighs a bit less than 5 of Grannyknot's anvils.

The S30 has plan-view measurements of about 162" L x 64" W.  If the entire unibody was fabricated from 20-gauge sheet (0.036"), you'd need a single sheet measuring about 350 SF.  If you wanted to make your own from 4' x 10' sheets of 20-gauge, you'd need 9 sheets.  But then, allowing for scrappage from the cut patterns, you probably need to actually buy about 30 sheets.  A 4' x 10' sheet of 20-gauge hot rolled steel sheet currently costs about $90, so that means your bill out the door of the metal supply shop would be about $2700.  You could probably recover half of that by selling the scrap to a recycler.  So let's call it $2000 for the material needed to make your own S30 unibody.  Freight, taxes, and labour costs extra, of course.

If you started with a single 348-SF sheet of 20-gauge that was 64" wide (same as the length of of S30) and laid it crosswise and centred under the car, it would extend two car widths on either side of the car outline.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

If you did all of your pulling and pushing from the same bars that connect to the rotisserie, then I think it works out.

Yes, that is exactly how it was done, thanks for confirming that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Patcon said:

You're killing me. Tons of progress

I just haven't updated in 3 months!  I spent a couple of days over the winter just chasing the threads on the entire car, such a treat now to screw in a freshly zincd bolts.  Hoping to get the engine/trans in this weekend.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, madkaw said:

Truly amazing . The paint looks gorgeous. How many hours a week do you devote to Z work?

Thanks,  I'm lucky enough to get get 4 months off each winter so for that block of time it's 8-10 hrs a day 5-6 days a week,  I think I have about 2700 hrs into the car so far and I would guess about half of that is sanding and polishing.  The paint is not perfect, there are flaws but I' m hoping they are just more noticeable to me.

8 hours ago, 240260280 said:

His third major resto that I know of.  A brilliant craftsman!

Aw shucks

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, grannyknot said:

Thanks,  I'm lucky enough to get get 4 months off each winter so for that block of time it's 8-10 hrs a day 5-6 days a week,  I think I have about 2700 hrs into the car so far and I would guess about half of that is sanding and polishing.  The paint is not perfect, there are flaws but I' m hoping they are just more noticeable to me.

Aw shucks

We are our worst critics . Looks like you are doing this at your own garage and not a paint booth . I can see how straight the doors are from the pics . 

I am retired now and still would have a hard time dedicating that much time( energy). I would like to work on Z ‘s in retirement for some fun and mad money for myself, but it’s still work at times. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, madkaw said:

but it’s still work at times.  

Damn right, there were times I when I covered head to toe in sanding dust wondering how I thought this would be fun - again.

8 hours ago, madkaw said:

We are our worst critics . Looks like you are doing this at your own garage and not a paint booth . I can see how straight the doors are from the pics .  

I scrubbed out the shop, covered everything in plastic, soaked the floors in water and it worked out okay, not too many floaters to file off.

 

8 hours ago, Namerow said:

Are those new mustache bar mount bushings (the serrated ones)?  If they are, where did you find them?

I wish they were new, I couldn't find any so I used the original ones that are in pretty good shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.