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SS Bumpers from Vietnam

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I believe that he may have used steel wool 0000 to polish the scratches out, then a buffer to polish the SS back to a shine.

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I've been using 0000 steel wool on chrome, SS and glass for decades and have had no problems at all, it removes virtually everything that is on the surface, then a quick hand buff with a clean cloth and chrome polish and it is gleaming. Just make sure you have 4 zero's on the package.

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22 hours ago, 7tooZ said:

Are you saying you used steel wool on yours and it equaled the original finish?


72 body and block, everything else 71, Tokico springs, Illumina, R180 CLSD, 83 close ratio, 3.90 gears, Ztherapy SUs, BRE 15X7 Libre wheels and BRE front spoiler.

No! I've been advise to do so by my carbody shop owner. Professionnal tip i cannot give feedback on.

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i've been told steel wool 0000 to be one of the best solution...tested?
 

My comments were in regard to my experience with Harrington bumpers I had
purchased. Not all SS is the same. Sounds like others have had a better experience.


72 body and block, everything else 71, Tokico springs, Illumina, R180 CLSD, 83 close ratio, 3.90 gears, Ztherapy SUs, BRE 15X7 Libre wheels and BRE front spoiler.
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21 hours ago, 7tooZ said:


My comments were in regard to my experience with Harrington bumpers I had
purchased. Not all SS is the same. Sounds like others have had a better experience.


72 body and block, everything else 71, Tokico springs, Illumina, R180 CLSD, 83 close ratio, 3.90 gears, Ztherapy SUs, BRE 15X7 Libre wheels and BRE front spoiler.

Just out of curiosity, what did you find when you used steel wool on your bumpers, scratching?

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It dulled the finish. Further polishing was difficult without removing the bumper. Took it to a professional who quoted 250.00 to polish. So I gave up and gave away the bumpers and had two bumpers rechromed at a quality shop. One of the best things I added to my car.


72 body and block, everything else 71, Tokico springs, Illumina, R180 CLSD, 83 close ratio, 3.90 gears, Ztherapy SUs, BRE 15X7 Libre wheels and BRE front spoiler.

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I heard that steel wool is often a bad idea on stainless because it embeds rust-able particles in an otherwise non-rusting surface. Doesn't hurt the overall integrity of the material, but can make it look poorly. Same with wire wheeling.

Note that "I heard it on the internet", so take that for as much truth as it's worth. YMMV.

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5 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

I heard that steel wool is often a bad idea on stainless because it embeds rust-able particles in an otherwise non-rusting surface. Doesn't hurt the overall integrity of the material, but can make it look poorly. Same with wire wheeling.

Note that "I heard it on the internet", so take that for as much truth as it's worth. YMMV.

I have heard the same thing. Although I have no actual experience to confirm it.

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At least I'm not the only one who heard it on the internet!

I probably read it at the same place I read that you should grind your TIG tungstens on a dedicated wheel that you don't use to grind other materials so you don't contaminate them.

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6 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

 

I probably read it at the same place I read that you should grind your TIG tungstens on a dedicated wheel that you don't use to grind other materials so you don't contaminate them.

I believe that one.

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Not to get politica,l but you can thank the US Government and the EPA for the cost of re chroming.  They put so many regulation on the shops that small companies couldn't afford it and went out of business, leaving only large shops in the market.  With little competition and massive regulations, we get stuck with astronomical cost.

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If I have to pay more to get my antique car bumpers chromed in exchange for my kids having cleaner water to drink, I guess I'll take that tradeoff.    :ph34r:

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9 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

If I have to pay more to get my antique car bumpers chromed in exchange for my kids having cleaner water to drink, I guess I'll take that tradeoff.    :ph34r:

I am not sure they are mutually exclusive. Many of the processes have been driven off shore simply from the hazards associated with them and our litigious society. Since I haven't ever been through a plating facility and seen how they handle the process start to finish. I can't speak to whether they affect the water quality. I suspect the real issue is employee exposure to hazardous materials and not being able to afford the liability insurance and workers comp rates and still compete against foreign made products that don't carry that overhead burden. Now don't misconstrue, I am all for protecting workers health and reducing personal liability through coverage but those are real costs that control product pricing. I also suspect that the owners of those plating shops want their kids to have clean water and their grandkids too.

As a side note, do you know we make no red glazed ceramics in the US? Or do any animal hide tanning in the US? All over seas for the same reason. Red ceramics have lots of lead in them and lead fumes aren't very good for the recipient of them. Tanning hides is evidently a pretty toxic process. So we ship our hides overseas to be tanned then ship them back as leather to be used

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