Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Stanley

Seafoam spray through carbs ?

Recommended Posts

My 240z has been running rich for a while. The replacement cylinder head was sparkly new-looking when installed 6 or 7 years ago. Thinking about running a spray can of Seafoam through the SU's to clean up the top end. Read some threads on this site about it but they don't mention using the spray type. Seafoam site recommends using spray type except for professional applications. I guess I'd do it by spraying into one carb about 15 seconds and switching to the other one for 15 seconds etc until the can is empty.

Not sure I want to do this but read mostly good reviews of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, 240260280 said:

Check out the seafoam tests on youtube on lawn mowers... not a big result.

That's where I get the air filter remark. :)  Every single time my commercial mower starts running bad it's ALWAYS the air filter, cleaning them a few times is okay but I buy a new one every spring.  

Another thing is the summer gas blend the do in California.  Could that have an effect on you Z?

Edited by siteunseen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually throw a can of seafoam into the tank once a year and it keeps things pretty clean but if I have an engine that I know is crusted up with carbon I'll either spray it in or let a vacuum hose suck it straight out of the can until it drowns the engine, let it sit over night and start it up again. Stand back cause you will be in for a smoke show, I guess I am assuming that all that smoke is the crap that the seafoam has loosened up overnight but I have no proof other than I have used the stuff to clean carb parts and it does a great job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, grannyknot said:

I guess I am assuming that all that smoke is the crap that the seafoam has loosened up overnight but I have no proof other than I have used the stuff to clean carb parts and it does a great job.

That's the image they've created.  But run the stuff through a freshly rebuilt engine you'll probably get just as much smoke.

Check the SDS - http://seafoamsales.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Sea-Foam-Motor-Treatment-SDS-v20161205-ENG.pdf

Seafoam SDS.PNG

"Hydrocarbons" come from oil, anything/everything from methane to diesel could be in there.  But they're all just crude oil fractions.  A bottle of rubbing alcohol and a gallon of paint thinner and you might have the same blend.

http://www.gcelectronics.com/order/msds/226.pdf

 

 

 

Edited by Zed Head

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that they must add some butane or pentane so that intake vacuum will cause it to foam.  So it probably does foam up and get the solvent in to areas it might not otherwise reach.  But it won't dissolve the typical hard carbon deposits in an intake runner or back of a valve, I think.  Somebody wrote about that somewhere out on the internet.  You just end up with clean carbon deposits.

Edited by Zed Head

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No offense, if you're a Seafoam fan.  There just doesn't seem to be much evidence behind it.  You'd think that they'd have a video that actually showed a dirty engine getting cleaner inside.  They do have one though - https://seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-official-video-how-to-clean-a-fuel-injection-gasoline-intake-with-sea-foam-spray/

"backwash" vapors at 2:25.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that the lawnmower stuff?  I didn't search the youtube tube.

 

Edited by Zed Head

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

No offense, if you're a Seafoam fan.  There just doesn't seem to be much evidence behind it.  You'd think that they'd have a video that actually showed a dirty engine getting cleaner inside.  They do have one though - https://seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-official-video-how-to-clean-a-fuel-injection-gasoline-intake-with-sea-foam-spray/

"backwash" vapors at 2:25.

 

after watching that video, i truly believe the phrase "there is a sucker born every minute"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not seeing a huge amount of excitement here about Seafoam. Also, the dread I had about carbon build-up from running rich for a few months evaporated an hour ago when I pulled the spark plugs.

Yesterday I swapped the SM's for some modded N-27's, opened the gap on the crappy old points a bit so it would start, set the mix 2 1/8 turns down and checked the flow, and drove to Gardena in 2nd gear to pick up some lube for the points cam, then over to Torrance for some groceries. The engine temp got up to halfway on the gauge which almost never happens (have some cooling system mods for summer trips through Blythe). Had to stop three times to lower the idle, which I'd previously raised so it would keep running with the no points gap shituation. Each time I noticed how hot the engine was. Almost burned my hand adjusting the idle. Couple times it crapped out and died, I realized it would keep running if I pulled the choke way back.

So today I found (after an hour of searching) a new set of Nissan points and the feeler gauge. After installing the points still had some daylight left, so checked the plugs. Amazing. They were all spotless and new-looking except some grayish lean-burn stuff on the ground side. After seeing the plugs fouled for months I couldn't believe it.The sooty stuff on the insulator I could never reach with the wire brush was all gone. Maybe the lean condition 2nd gear run cleaned out the engine. Think I'll richen it up a little though.

Edited by Stanley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel bad for bashing on the Seafoam.

Seems like you were looking at Seafoam to fix what's really just a tuning problem, and maybe some other issues.  The engine almost never gets up to temp?  Maybe you need a new thermostat.  There's another thread going on where thermostats were mentioned.  I noticed a significant effect of replacing what appeared to be a good thermostat with a new Nissan thermostat.  The old thermostat seemed to open at the correct temperature, tested on the stove in a pan of water using a thermometer, but I think that it had a weak spring and was blowing open in operation.  The engine ran cool and would fluctuate from below halfway to halfway.  With the new T-stat the needle just slowly rises to a little over halfway and sits there.  Doesn't budge once it gets there.  Very noticeable difference from the old one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's disappointing!

Seafoam was just about the only 'Mechanic in a Can' product I purchased because I thought it was different. Just goes to show how powerful the placebo effect is. Thanks for popping my bliss bubble:cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't studied or used the stuff, but it sets off my snake oil alarm.

Pour it into the gas tank. Draw it directly into the intake tract. You can even rub it on sore muscles. Puts tread back on worn tires. Cures whatever ails ya!

More power to the people who believe they've gotten good results, but I just don't like the sound of it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The claims that seafoam is a mechanic in a can or cleans up carbon in one shot are dubious, but the stuff has its place.  I use a bunch of it on my dirt bikes here in California, home to high ethanol content gas that was never approved for use in my dirt bikes.  Ultimately the stuff is a solvent that burns well enough to use on fuel systems.  My typical use is cleaning out bike carbs but I also find that if I drain the carbs before storage and also spray some sea foam up the overflow tubes they don't clog up in storage.  Other chemicals probably work just as well but I find in this application seafoam does work better than WD40

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thermostat is fine, it's a 180 degree IIRC Nissan. Temp climbs to a little to the left of the middle of the gauge where the thermostat opens and stays there. If I'm going up the hill from Palm Springs to Chiriaco Summit in summer for example it will go to a little right of center. Glad it's 180 not 165 degrees or it wouldn't get to correct operating temp with the oil cooler. Should probably cover the oil cooler with a blanket or something in winter. It does have a bypass that's supposed to work until the oil heats up, though. Don't remember what temp it's supposed to kick in.

High-jacking my thread: noticed that the cam follower on the old points was quite worn down, decreasing the point gap and apparently causing the points to wear down. Gonna keep the points cam greased with correct grease from now on.    Pep Boys, Autozone and O'Reilly didn't have it but my local independent auto parts store got me some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Zed Head said:

Is that the lawnmower stuff?  I didn't search the youtube tube.

 

I use this stuff on my hand held Stihl 4-Mix equipment to clean the valves.  Run them until hot, pull the plug out and shoot in the hole.  Pull the rope a few times to get it in there and let it sit overnight.  Pull the rope a few more times, put the plug back in and let it rip.  Been doing this for six years and never had to adjust the valves.

The trick is shoot it straight into the plug's hole, not the carburetor and it bypasses all the intake stuff then when you pull the rope it gets into the valves.  A lot of guys do this although it may be witchcraft thinking but it seems to help so I continue to do so, stay positive. :D

Edit. Not six years, since buying them in '06.

Image result for deep creep

Edited by siteunseen
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.