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Matthew Abate

Too Good to Be True? – 125 Amp Bolt in Alternator @ Datsun Store

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So I stumbled upon this 125 amp alternator at Datsun Store while researching the various alternator upgrade options out there (GM, Pathfinder, Maxima, etc.), and I am really curious what exactly they have here.

They claim that it's bolt in, doesn't need the T-plug, is internally regulated, doesn't require any diodes or new wire looms or bracket modifications, and the pulley it comes with will work if you get a particular fan belt. They also claim 50+ amps at an idle around 550 rpm.

Is it just me or is this too good to be true? I've seen other options that make some of these claims, but nothing with this much juice that doesn't also have at least one thing you have to modify or fabricate or some kind of drawback like not charging the battery under 1,000 rpm.

The main reason I haven't just pulled the trigger is that it's double the cost of other options at $289.000 (although not as much as the things they have at RHD). Up until now I had been looking at the bolt in 90-amp one at Z Car Depot for $139.00.

What do you guys think?

Edited by Matthew Abate

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Oliver's alternator, shipping is about $40, uses a special belt.   He does not specify what it is,  cost $28.

He has offered the alternator for quite a while,  I wonder if anyone here is running one?

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The questions are answered on the web page.  No core charge.  Cases cut to fit.  Belt info supplied with the belt so that you can replace it in the future.

He wires the Sense and Lamp wire directly to the charging wire.  So you'll lose your Charge warning lamp (described on the page).  It's basically a bare-bones primitive charging system, with high capacity.  A person could probably wire it up to work correctly and still get the high capacity.  He's both reducing and increasing the value of the product, one by losing the Charge lamp and adding the special belt, and the other by making it almost fool-proof to install.  The belt is probably necessary for the same reason that manufacturers went to the multi-groove belts.  It takes more torque to spin the little pulley when it's putting out the high amps.

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Great info. Thanks for clarifying his description for me.

Right now I'm leaning toward the 90 amp one on Z Car Depot if I can find out what the wiring situation is with that one.

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Z Car Depot should really have more wiring info on that page.  I'm sure that they're missing sales because of non-clarity about one of the most confusing parts of the alternator swaps.  You'd need one of Dave Irwin's (or MSA's) adapters for your 240Z, since yours came with an external regulator.

@zcardepot.com

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This 90 amp alternator is a fairly new product to us.  We do have the connectors for this alternator in stock now.  As with all of our parts feel free to email or call us with any questions.

https://zcardepot.com/electrical/battery/alternator-high-amp-90-240z-260z-280z.html?search=alternator

 

Thanks,

Zcardepot.com

email: sales@zcardepot.com

PH: 844-865-2473

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Is the connector different than the Z car connector?  Not a T plug?  Still not clear.  Is it an adapter or is it a plug that needs to be wired up?

Just trying to help out.  You didn't really answer any questions.  No offense.  It's looking like a late Maxima alternator with a pulley swap, that doesn't use a T plug.

@zcardepot.com

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17 hours ago, wheee! said:

Mark, That link keeps bouncing me to the first post in your thread. What's the individual post number you were trying to share?

Edited by Matthew Abate

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2 minutes ago, Matthew Abate said:

Mark, That link keeps bouncing me to the first post in your thread. What's the individual post number you were trying to share?

Hilarious... I was just working on that as my Tapatalk version goes to the link. Getting the right info as we speak....

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Post 203, Page 9 of the thread (wow that thread is getting big...!)

 

Modified the stock lower alternator mount to accept the GM 10SI 100A alternator.

Marked off at 1.78" for margin of error.

ed75df638f8806e26182a227cf70f9b0.jpg

On the cold cut saw...

7db8f24a4a6680cc4c24cc2b2baf0510.jpg

1f00dde82e91b2bbc776f2ac23765dd6.jpg

Ready for drilling out to 3/8ths...

773a8be158b0a28c5392a84752a32bb3.jpg

Finished after another quick sandblast and final measurements....

a2a59312b678c6c75f9ac3d3b7c16411.jpg

6261ce44984a655032ebc8014e3eaa9c.jpg

 More in the blog if you go to that post/page....

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I found a website that manufactures brand new GM alternators that's somewhat customizable. I ordered one with the lower mounting tab thinner(1 inch instead of 2) they have some options for pulleys and amp range. I'll update once the unit is installed.


Sent from my iPhone using Classic Zcar Club mobile

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i guess my question is this

how big of an alternator do you really need?

big stereo system or lighting system may require big amps. just curious

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If one go's to a bigger alternator, you will need bigger wiring ...  standard is 60 amps, you don't need more..  When you do, and i speak here as an electrician, you will have a fair chance that one day you car catches fire..

If you want more reserve power, go for more led-lights, you save a lot of Amps there for that loud stereo! :D  and you're wiring thanks you...

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Whoa. Yeah. I hadn't thought of that. I hadn't noticed anyone even broach that subject in any of the alternator upgrade conversations that I've read.

Something else to add o the research. Thanks.

Edited by Matthew Abate

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but a higher current alternator will not "push" more power to anything other than the battery. The current draw from your connected devices (lights, stereo, fans etc) is set by the device. Therefore your wiring harness is just fine. Decreasing the gauge size (smaller gauge = thicker cable) of the main charging wire couldn't hurt though. Just make sure whatever device you ADD to the car gets the proper size wire gauge and fuse and you should be fine.
Background: I am a military electronic/optronic specialist....

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If one go's to a bigger alternator, you will need bigger wiring ...  standard is 60 amps, you don't need more..  When you do, and i speak here as an electrician, you will have a fair chance that one day you car catches fire..
If you want more reserve power, go for more led-lights, you save a lot of Amps there for that loud stereo!   and you're wiring thanks you...


Agreed. I was considering going all led


Sent from my iPhone using Classic Zcar Club mobile

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51 minutes ago, wheee! said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but a higher current alternator will not "push" more power to anything other than the battery. The current draw from your connected devices (lights, stereo, fans etc) is set by the device. Therefore your wiring harness is just fine. Decreasing the gauge size (smaller gauge = thicker cable) of the main charging wire couldn't hurt though. Just make sure whatever device you ADD to the car gets the proper size wire gauge and fuse and you should be fine.
Background: I am a military electronic/optronic specialist....

Is that because the alternator would just connect directly to the battery and not the harness? I think of you go with a 2-wire solution to get the low rpm charging you are connecting to the harness.

im following you on the various items pulling from the battery, though. I think. I'm not up on the wiring in these cars yet.

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I believe that the internally regulated alternator "senses" the voltage drop of the battery and regulates the charging voltage to the battery, preventing overcharging. This keeps the voltage output of the alternator around 13.8v while charging and prevents the battery from draining while the vehicle is running. The field wire is designed to detect the sine wave of the charging come from the properly working alternator (alternating square wave, AC voltage). The dash light illuminates, indicating a "no charge" condition when the car is not running or if the alternator is malfunctioning. 

The alternator is never connected directly to the harness in terms of charging any electrical items other than the battery. The current is then drawn from the battery through the fuse block and throughout the harness. A larger alternator will have a greater CAPACITY to support a larger load of electronics (bigger headlights, bigger stereo, electrical fans, power accessories...) but it will not force any of the existing electronics and wiring to use any of the extra capacity of the alternator. It will only provide more power when needed versus the stock size alternator. Different size wires in the harness are used because each device draws a different amount of current, some requiring a thicker gauge of wire to prevent overheating. You can have two wires connected to the battery for example, one for the starter and one for the engine bay amp. One is super thick and one is very thin. They are both connected to the same battery but each DRAWS a different current amount to operate. Therefore the wire is matched to the draw of the device, NOT the output of the alternator or capacity of the battery.

Think of it as a larger gas tank.... does the same thing as a smaller tank, only lets you go farther! The bigger alternator just lets you consume more power when NEEDED....

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Mark, your absolutely right. But what's the use of a bigger Alternator then... and as you, i recommend a thicker cable between your alternator and battery.

The danger in a bigger alternator is that some people forget the original wires to the fusebox are standard already on the small side..  add some H4 headlights and things already are overloaded..  see the topics about "smell after 15 minutes riding in the dark".  And age have made them already vulnerable.

Are there a lot of good fuseboxes?  and, those bigger alternators have bigger wiring and are heavier, no need for extra (As you all say) Pounds..

 

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3 hours ago, Martzedcars said:

Mark, your absolutely right. But what's the use of a bigger Alternator then... and as you, i recommend a thicker cable between your alternator and battery.

The danger in a bigger alternator is that some people forget the original wires to the fusebox are standard already on the small side..  add some H4 headlights and things already are overloaded..  see the topics about "smell after 15 minutes riding in the dark".  And age have made them already vulnerable.

Are there a lot of good fuseboxes?  and, those bigger alternators have bigger wiring and are heavier, no need for extra (As you all say) Pounds..

 

It would be no problem if you changed the entire wiring harness in the car for a modern version. I don't know if that is there for the Datsun but it put a wiring harness from american autowire in my mustang, and that works with a modern self regulating alternator

Edit: there's no harness specific for the 240Z, but there are " universal kits " that if your handy, can make fit into the car. Like this one:

https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/aww-500703/overview/

Edited by bartsscooterservice

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I agree with most of the above. The alternator only supplies what is needed, and the advantage to a higher amperage capable alternator is that it is CAPABLE of supplying more amps to the system if asked. The original alternator was sized in relation to the expected needs of the original car, and in theory, anything larger than that is not necessary.

But, if you go adding an electric fan on the radiator, fog lights, electric windows, a rear window blower defroster fan, or a huge bass thumping stereo system? You may need additional capacity. Contrary to opinions above, I don't think adding H4 headlights should be a significant change from the original system. You're replacing one high current draw item with another one of similar draw.

As for the wiring... since the alternator only supplies what is needed, if it's just an alternator capacity change and you don't add additional accessories, the wiring will not know that anything changed. But if you go adding those high draw accessories, you need to really study the current path(s) involved and make sure the wiring is up to the task.

I haven't looked, but I suspect availability could be an issue. In this day and age of more accessories is the norm and bigger is better, the higher capacity alternators may be cheaper and easier to find (up to a point).

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