Jump to content

jfa.series1

Unicorn Alert: Rubber Steering Coupler

Recommended Posts

Unicorn: a mythical animal typically represented as a horse with a single straight horn projecting from its forehead.  Alt.: a rare Datsun part, usually made of unobtanium.

I took this rubber steering coupler from a 12/71 parts car recently.  Its in amazing condition - the rubber is flexible and lively, NO CRACKS or other damage, no signs of aging, bolts/nuts are in perfect condition - no thread damage.  I've used a wire wheel on the plates and bolts to remove rust, bathed everything in Metal Ready.  I'd throw a coat of black paint on the plates but its too cold to paint right now.  Offering it here to fellow enthusiasts before listing on any classifieds or eBay.  Priced at $40, includes USPS Flat Rate Priority shipping.

100_2565.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, sweatybetty said:

are these things really worth money???

I'm wondering the same, can't you just get aftermarket ones? I'm guessing this is for those that want original?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This might be one of those cases where rubber is better that poly for a street car.   The polurethane ones transmit too much road feedback thru the steering column.   The oem ones I am guessing are NLA.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggested @nix240z (http://www.240Zrubberparts.com) reproduce the steering rack bushings in the past.

Maybe with the "sure to come" increasing demand for real rubber in instead of urethane he will  reproduce them.

The price point is certainly getting there. Maybe he will reconsider!  :)

Jim D.

"Zup"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Patcon said:

yes the OE's are NLA...Wish we could convince a vendor to reproduce this part...

It's not the material itself that matters, it's the properties of the material.  Rubber can be made rock-hard also.

https://whiteheadperformance.com/product/whiteline-steering-coupler-kit-w11044-datsun-240z-260z-280z/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Zed Head said:

It's not the material itself that matters, it's the properties of the material.  Rubber can be made rock-hard also.

Oh, I understand but like Jim I was thinking of Nix240z. If he were to decide to do it I am confident he would get as close as possible to the original rubber density. He's a little OCD like that...I believe that Zcardepot and MSA tend to be pretty diligent too

Steve has always been hesitant to make parts that could have litigation associated with them, but this part should have limited risks since the bolts are really the insurance factor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the reason Steve gave me Charles.

I don't think there is a liability-- as you said the bolts are the critical component for safety---the rubber is only a means to modulate applied forces for improved driving comfort. (primarily reduced vibration and sound transmission)

I've never heard of an accident caused by deteriorated rack bushings or steering couplers---has anyone??

It could be there was a West Coast incident of the phenomena as reported on Facebook that I missed----:huh:

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What has happened to our DIY culture on this item?

Let's see, what do we need?

1. Use a hated polyurethane bushing as a pattern and source of the four steel hole lining bushings. You can also laboriously extract these bushing from your old rubber one too. 

2. Acquire a chunk of rubber. Get a few different durometers. If your get 1/4 thickness of various durometers to build a sandwich and experiment with the steering feel until you get what you like. McMaster carr has a large variety of rubber types, some even with reinforcing layers. Rubber suppliers are surprisingly common. This stuff is not high tech.

3. Size and drill the holes using the old poly bushing as a guide.

4. Press the steel bushings into the holes.

5. Assemble on the car and go for a drive.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am interested in hearing from people that actually like the poly coupler for street use... I have the original rubber part but was planning on getting the poly kit with a new coupler. I have never driven a 280Z (yet) so I was concerned when I felt the "slop" in the steering column while wheeling it around...
I also plan on using the shortened bump steering knuckles from Arizona Z Car for a quicker turn ratio. Is it really that harsh with poly??

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought one of MSA's packages of bushings years ago, on sale, and the only ID of manufacturer inside was an instruction sheet from Ground Control.  So assume that my coupler is from GC.  I haven't noticed any harshness at all, just a tighter feel at the wheel.  I'm running 205/70-14 tires.  Low profile tires could have a big affect on the problem.  I also have an old worn-out spongy steering wheel cover.  I imagine that a nice wood wheel would transmit the harshness also.  I don't wear gloves though.  Another factor.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too bought the MSA bushing pkg. thinking it was the way to go.  After getting the car back on the road, I regretted that decision.  I have eccentric bushings on the front control arms for camber adjustment so there went the stock rubber bushings.  With poly in the rack and steering coupler, there was a lot of road feedback getting to the steering wheel - way lot!  I was fortunate to find a set of Beck Arnley rubber rack bushings and did not hesitate to swap back to the OE coupler.  Now, all is well with the steering feel.

PS - I also swapped out the T/C rod poly bushings back to new rubber.  Not a fix for steering but much better overall front-end behavior.  I have 16" wheels with 205/55 tires.

Edited by jfa.series1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You did the common two variable experiment.  Changed two things at once, confounding the results.  Maybe it's the rack bushings.  You didn't mention your steering wheel either.

I think that all you can get out of these discussions is that it's not just one thing.  You have to look at the path from road to hands and make your choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

You did the common two variable experiment.  Changed two things at once, confounding the results.  Maybe it's the rack bushings.  You didn't mention your steering wheel either.

Guilty as charged.  I have a stock steering wheel and really did not want to mess with experimentation.  I'm well satisfied with the sharpness of the steering with new tie rod ends, new ball joints, and the rubber content.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My steering wheel will be stock and leather wrapped so somewhat spongy. I will try the poly first, if it is too harsh I can put the rubber back in...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online   4 Members, 1 Anonymous, 31 Guests (See full list)

  • Search Engine Meta Tags:
    classic, z, datsun, 240z, 260z, 280z, zcar, zed, s30, classiczcars.com, 240z.org, fairlady, 240, 260, 280, nissan, 240 z, 260 z, 280 z, zx, turbo, classic z, 280z cars, cars 240z, car forums, datsun, nissan, cars datsun, car club, 280zx, car, nissan zcar, classic z car,performance,300zx, car years, car raced, texas 350z, 300z, 350z, nissan racing , clubs car, zcca, club datsun
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.