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hatepotholez

Fuel tank repair

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Hi Guys,

So I have a small pin hole in my gas tank. The local radiator shop said they can fix it but they no longer coat the inside of the tank. They said they stopped due to the coating ruining the lines over the years. 

 

Any thoughts on this? 

 

Thanks!

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You really don't have to coat the inside.  Blue didn't here and they weren't from the factory.  Just keep it full.

http://atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/fuel/gastank/index.htm

I used Red Kote on one 6 years ago and haven't had any problems so far.  And @Bonzi Lon used it some years ago and I don't think he's had any trouble either, hopefully he will reply and tell us the years. 

Maybe the radiator shop just don't want to fool with it?

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1 hour ago, siteunseen said:

You really don't have to coat the inside.  Blue didn't here and they weren't from the factory.  Just keep it full.

http://atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/fuel/gastank/index.htm

I used Red Kote on one 6 years ago and haven't had any problems so far.  And @Bonzi Lon used it some years ago and I don't think he's had any trouble either, hopefully he will reply and tell us the years. 

Maybe the radiator shop just don't want to fool with it?

 

The shop was referred to me by many and they also did my heater core for the Z. They do good work, but I am assuming they don't trust the coating for the gas tanks. 

Edited by hatepotholez

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How do you guys plug the carburetor siphon line in the tank when doing the coating on the interior? The only tank I've ever done was an EFI tank for a different car, so it wasn't a problem.

But the carb line goes across the tank into the other side passed the slosh-plate. 

It's so tiny too, i'm afraid of plugging it with the tank sealer.

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I put Gorilla Taped over the ends of all my tubes coming out of the tank.  After emptying the coating out I blew through them with around 90psi of air.  Waited 5 or 10 minutes and hit them again to be sure.  Worked good for me.

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Sorry for the delay in getting to this.

 

I did mine in a product called "Kreem", it took two of them, as these are made for large motorcycle tanks.  Like siteunseen  said above, a wire to make sure the vents are open and high pressure air to make sure they stay open.  A mirror on a stick and lots of light you can see for sure every inch of the interior. 

 

I have had no problems of any kind.  I did mine in the spring of 06 and did not use it until the refurbishment was done in spring of 08 before it saw fuel.  And that is the key to most of the failures that I have read about, not enough curing time.  So make sure it is really hard before you add gasoline. 

 

Bonzi Lon

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On 8/3/2016 at 3:56 PM, hatepotholez said:

The shop was referred to me by many and they also did my heater core for the Z. They do good work, but I am assuming they don't trust the coating for the gas tanks. 

Some of the older formulations of tank sealer aren't fairing as well as the newer coatings with regards to the alcohol in fuel now, maybe they don't want to risk the liability and quit doing it altogether. Before I started using the POR15 tank sealant, which I love and have never had any problems with I would take the tank to bare metal with acid, neutralize it, dry it completely and then pour in some 2 stroke oil and coat all the inside surfaces, let it sit in there for a couple of days and then return it to duty. That's a fairly common procedure for restoring motorcycle tanks and works well.

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Seems like the sealers are more designed to save tanks with potential pinholes, thin spots, cracks, etc.  If you have solid steel, the cleaning and rust removal is probably enough.

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I am considering the sealer because I had to use a dent puller to remove some of the dents on the tank, and in doing so- it turned out amazing and the tank looks almost new, but there are spots that did pull through and i had to patch up. so i'll probably be using the tank sealer from Caswell.

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My theory (not supported by fact) is that these tanks were originally plated with cad or zinc or something else on the inside which helped preserve the tank. My low mile 72 240 tank looked really good on the inside with sort of a plated look in 90 pct of the areas I could see. When you acid dip the tank, boil it out, whatever....you remove whatever remains of this plating. Phosphoric acid will etch and preserve for a while but unless you keep the tank full all the time, I believe it will ultimately rust a lot faster than it did originally. So, I think coating is sort of necessary. I plan to redkote mine but make sure that I let it cure for a long time. I wish there was a way to re-plate it with something similar to what was originally used. There probably is a way but I just haven't found it. I could have it zinc coated but wonder whether it would hold up the way the original plating did. Again, I have no data / facts that support my belief that the tanks were originally plated. It is just my opinion.

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 It should be possible to hot dip galvanize a Z tank if was meticulously clean. One would have to be sure the lines were blown out with compressed air as soon it comes out of the zinc tank. The fuel tank would last longer than the Z body if it was galvanized and would be better than the original coating. (If there was one.). But theoretically, it's possible to galvanize a Z body too. Rain? What rain!

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I had my car painted several months ago. During the Restoration procedure, the shop that painted the car removed the gas tank and hoses from the car and i believe that accidentally damaged on of the fuel metal lines that form part of the tank and could be the 5mm - 3/16 or the 8 mm - 5/16 one. One of these metal lines leaks a Little bit of gas when the gas tank is full. Should i remove the tank, flush it and start soldering the broken line or would any cold solder mix product fix this permanently? or should i just simply try to find a new tank??

metal line tank 3.jpg

Metal line tank 2.jpg

Metal line tank 1.jpg

Edited by jalexquijano

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For many years, I carried an applicator tube of two part epoxy aircraft fuel tank sealant in my Z in case of emergency leaks like that.  Never had to use it and not sure if you can still buy such a product.  But, at the time, I figured if it worked on a C-130 aircraft tank it would work on a Z.

Dennis

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Be very careful about soldering on a fuel tank. They can still have fumes in them even after washing. Blowing yourself or someone else up is bad...

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2 hours ago, Patcon said:

Be very careful about soldering on a fuel tank. They can still have fumes in them even after washing. Blowing yourself or someone else up is bad...

 Not good for the tank either.

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So can someone recommend a product for sealing this small but small leak without soldering?? My tank is fine! it has no rust inside! Just these people that pull the tank down and struck the small metal line which is now bleeding when the tank is full.

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14 minutes ago, jalexquijano said:

So can someone recommend a product for sealing this small but small leak without soldering?? My tank is fine! it has no rust inside! Just these people that pull the tank down and struck the small metal line which is now bleeding when the tank is full.

I know you've had the "DO A GOOGLE SEARCH" lectures a few times in the past.  Look what I found when I did a Google search for "fix gas tank leaks" - this and about 500 additional suggestions.  I'm fairly certain you could have done that, too.  Time to put on your Big Boy Z Fixer coveralls and do a little research on the problems you encounter.  On the other hand, you could sell the car to someone willing to tackle routine maintenance projects and simplify your life and mine.

Dennis

 

 

Dennis

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42 minutes ago, jalexquijano said:

What about this one:

http://www.rakuten.com/prod/permatex-12020-gas-tank-repair-patch/275983790.html?listingid=378213259

Is this good enough?? Sorry friend but im not selling any car!

 

 

The only way to determine if it's good enough...... is to try it.  Let us know how it works out for you.

Dennis

 

 

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