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1976 280Z Restoration Project

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Wow, $$$!

That price is for both so it’s about what you would pay at any parts store, if you were only buying inner tie rod ends shipping would make them more expensive but if you are already getting other things from T3 then not a big deal.


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When they were available I never paid that much. Its been a number of years but I know I didn't  pay that much for them. Like TTT's site says "For inner tie rods, these are pricey, we know, but there is only one option on the market".

That is why they are so expensive.

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Been working on getting the stubs ready for new bearings. Ordered the bearings last week.

These look pretty nice! New studs to go in too.
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I think I’ll leave the hubs mounted for the bearing install. I have a bearing and race seating kit with an impact adapter. Should work fine.
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Death by a thousand restorations... worked on the battery bracket tonight. It was previously powder coated so it took a long time to strip and prep. It looks great but that was 3 hours of work tonight!
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Yep, sounds familiar.  Have you started doing zinc on all the various bits and pieces?  That takes a while too.  Nothing worse than setting your mind to putting some assembly back together only to find some rusty spring or washer that you missed.  How are you planning on doing the zinc part?  Do you have a small media blasting cabinet?  I would blast the small parts, zinc them and them throw them in my tumbler with corn cob media for an hour or two.  They'd come out nice and shiny.  

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After a lot of soul searching and hand wringing I came to a conclusion.... I won’t be plating any hardware.
My car has so many mods on it already that came with stainless fittings, I will probably end up with most of my hardware in stainless. Almost everything else is getting powder coated. The stand up blast cabinet I have is doing a great job so far. Powder coating is beautiful and durable too. It also does a great job on springs. Remains flexible.

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4 hours ago, wheee! said:

After a lot of soul searching and hand wringing I came to a conclusion.... I won’t be plating any hardware.
My car has so many mods on it already that came with stainless fittings, I will probably end up with most of my hardware in stainless. Almost everything else is getting powder coated. The stand up blast cabinet I have is doing a great job so far. Powder coating is beautiful and durable too. It also does a great job on springs. Remains flexible.

Sounds sensible.  I probably would have powder coated too if I'd had a setup for it.  

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Okay. What kind of witchcraft is this??
How the heck do I remove the u joints from the prop shaft?
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They're meant to be permanent.  "Staked" is the term to describe them.  Some driveshaft shops will machine out the stakes and make a circlip groove, or replace the joint and and restake it.

It's a bummer.

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Apparently they started staking in 1975.  So a 74 or older shaft will have replaceable joints.  The very early 1971 shafts, which are shorter, won't fit though.  But if you want the really good Nissan high-precision u-joints, they're about $70 each.

Edited by Zed Head
though placement

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I think zcardepot still sell complete units for around $350. Not sure if that is remanufactured or new aftermarket.

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Well I have great faith in you that if you really wanted that old U-joint out of the shaft, you could accomplish that task.   LOL  Complete confidence.

So a question for the collective... On the driveshaft's with the staked in U-joints. If you DO manage to get the old U-joint out, are new replacements available?

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From what I understand, the prop shaft needs to be machined to include a groove for the c clips after the staked u joints are pressed out. Doesn't seem like its worth it versus sourcing an older shaft to replace it with. Not interested in the hi performance aluminum versions or the ridiculously expensive offerings from re sellers for stock units.

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As I recall when I replaced the U Joints on my half shafts as well as the driveshaft, the C clips are actually installed on the U joints themselves (on the inside of the yoke) and so I don't really understand the need for a groove to be cut.  As long as the U Joints are of the same size I believe you should be able to just install new ones. 

Perhaps I'm missing something but this seems like it would work to me.  Does anyone know if the U Joint sizes are the same between the serviceable driveshafts and the newer non-serviceable ones?

Mike.

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Anything from 'Murica is going to be out of reach price wise when shipping and exchange is factored in. Luckily, Z Car Supermarket @zKars has three aisles of spare drive line parts available three hours south of me in sunny Calgarifornia. He has a small stash of parts sitting aside for me already so I will get him to add a prop shaft to the order as well. I'm sure if I asked for a horn pad, he'd have one made from real Unicorn....

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1 hour ago, Mike W said:

As I recall when I replaced the U Joints on my half shafts as well as the driveshaft, the C clips are actually installed on the U joints themselves (on the inside of the yoke) and so I don't really understand the need for a groove to be cut.  As long as the U Joints are of the same size I believe you should be able to just install new ones. 

Perhaps I'm missing something but this seems like it would work to me.  Does anyone know if the U Joint sizes are the same between the serviceable driveshafts and the newer non-serviceable ones?

Mike.

Mike,

If you try this you will come across several problems, or should I say challenges to some of us here:D

1. The uni-joints on the propeller shaft after 7/75 are much smaller than the earlier units. You can't use the early style/half shaft uni-joints.

2. You need to find uni-joints of the smaller size with grooves in the cups for circlips. Not many of the smaller ones do. They are out there. I did find some and noted the part numbers. Ill look them up and post them later. That brings up the next problem.

3. Finding a uni-joint with circlip grooves the right distance apart of 36mm.

Lets face it, parts are getting scarce. It would be nice to have this option.

Edited by EuroDat

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Little bit of digging and I found a grubby little yellow post-it with Rockford 430-10. They made them for nissan, subaru and many other models. They should fit and cost here in NL €29.50 each.

Cup diameter: 22mm

Distance between circlip outer edges: 35.7mm (standard circlips)

@wheee! Mark, If your uni's are stuffed, can you dismantle one and take some accurate measurements?

I have some other part numbers with slightly wider/narrower dimensions.

Edited by EuroDat

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MSA has them for $299.  With replaceable joints.  They must have a shop that makes them up.   I looked yesterday, it's on page 2 of the search results.  From what I've read about replacements shafts some of them come without the dirt shield and leave the slip yoke exposed.  Something to be aware of.

Other issues besides just getting the old joints out and the new ones in, with either of the possible methods for keeping them in, are balancing.  By the time it's a done, it's still just a part you can't see, that could end up causing vibration problems.  Seems like a high risk-reward ratio to try it yourself.  

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