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1976 280Z Restoration Project


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Just now, Patcon said:

Congrats!!

All the images seem to have downloaded small. I can't enlarge them...

Just fixed that....

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  • 3 weeks later...

There’s always one more thing… I took the time to rethink the push button start system this week. As it was designed for the stock electrical system, the ignition needed to be activated by pushing on the brake to start the car. But this was a pain in that it was clumsy and if you stalled in an intersection while rolling, you needed to stop the car with the brake to start it. 
So I had an idea to replace the rubber bumper on the clutch pedal with another brake pedal switch. Normally open, closed when the brake is pushed. I drilled out the rubber bumper nut in the pedal box for the bigger diameter brake switch, and wired it to accessory power and the push button ignition switch. Voila! I now start the car by pushing in the clutch instead of the brake! Much safer and easier to do!

Rubber bumper for attention.  Forgot to get a picture of the brake switch. 

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I bought a 1977 Chevy Monza Spyder with the 305 V8.  It was the first car I ran into which required the clutch pedal to be depressed to engage the starter.

Probably the first week I owned it, I pulled the switch out of place from the clutch pedal assembly and wired it closed so that the starter could be used any time. 

When I'm working on a car, I really don't want to have to climb into it to use the starter.

I and my family owned that car for 30 years, and not once did defeating that safety device result in damage or problems for anyone. 

 

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All my modern clutch cars are like that so it is a good “safety” feature for when the wife drives/starts the car.
Plus it is part of the wiring of the push button and I have no issues keeping a safety feature installed. I have five grandkids climbing around in there at times and one of them is bound to push the start button eventually….

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Just read a story about a young guy who got killed when he was ejected from his car while doing doughnuts.  It rolled, he got thrown, the truck landed on him.  It only takes one mistake.  

Forgot to say - he didn't have his seat belt fastened.  The primary safety feature for car crash safety.

Edited by Zed Head
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I've been a 240z owner for 47 years, kids, grandkids most of that time and I've actually had to use the starter in 1st gear to get going and once going it's easy enough to shift without grinding gears. This was due to a clutch slave failure on each of my 73 and 71 cars (and before that in my 61 Belaire wagon, clutch linkage broke). I also never leave the keys in the car so kids can't "hit" the start button. I guess they could push in the clutch and get it rolling, but isn't that true on current manual shifts?

Edited by w3wilkes
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18 hours ago, w3wilkes said:

I've been a 240z owner for 47 years, kids, grandkids most of that time and I've actually had to use the starter in 1st gear to get going and once going it's easy enough to shift without grinding gears. This was due to a clutch slave failure on each of my 73 and 71 cars (and before that in my 61 Belaire wagon, clutch linkage broke). I also never leave the keys in the car so kids can't "hit" the start button. I guess they could push in the clutch and get it rolling, but isn't that true on current manual shifts?

I have clear memories of a '66 LeMans with a 389 and a fried clutch. When I started it in gear, the clutch held and it would go, and I could shift without using the clutch. Had to be crafty at stoplights, though. 

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Finally got around to a few things this week. Changed the fuel filter before the pump… only about two hours of driving on it and it was filthy! New lines and a completely sanitized and coated tank meant I must have missed cleaning the inside of the rubber fuel filler neck. Only place for the crud to have come from. 
after that, I drove it around a bit tonight and 5th gear works perfect with new shifter and welded shaft! Yay! 

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On 8/11/2021 at 10:14 PM, wheee! said:

All my modern clutch cars are like that so it is a good “safety” feature for when the wife drives/starts the car.
Plus it is part of the wiring of the push button and I have no issues keeping a safety feature installed. I have five grandkids climbing around in there at times and one of them is bound to push the start button eventually….

Almost sent my mom's MG through a store front because I decided to turn the key from the passenger seat when I was a kid.

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On 8/11/2021 at 11:06 PM, w3wilkes said:

I've been a 240z owner for 47 years, kids, grandkids most of that time and I've actually had to use the starter in 1st gear to get going and once going it's easy enough to shift without grinding gears. This was due to a clutch slave failure on each of my 73 and 71 cars (and before that in my 61 Belaire wagon, clutch linkage broke). I also never leave the keys in the car so kids can't "hit" the start button. I guess they could push in the clutch and get it rolling, but isn't that true on current manual shifts?

Got home a few times that way. 

Edited by DC871F
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Here we have the famous Kia Sportage seal on the right and the MSA Z Store door seal on the left.  The first picture is relaxed normal size. The second and third pictures are compressed. Note the difference in the compression rate of the KIA seal… much tighter. This is why they make great replacements for the stock seal!

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Well, dyno day came and the car did quite well. Despite a dead O2 sensor that needed replacing, my tuner Matt did a stellar job clearing up the fuel tables and working his magic making the car run smooth and idle properly. 
 

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The mustang dyno came in at 210 HP and 252 TQ, but the load sensor was flaky and I’m not really sure where we ended up. We spent 8 hours tuning and each better than the last. I feel like a true number would be closer to 250 hp and 290 TQ. With a bit of mechanical advance on the timing chain, it might make a little better power under 4000 rpm. I will redyno in the spring. Overall the car runs great now. 

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