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timsz

Rack and pinion help.

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post-18844-14150827935105_thumb.jpg Is this the way this should be put back together. I can't tell from manuals. I thought i put them in the right series when i was working on it, but i must not have. The way i had them before, the side rod bar wouldn't tighten up. How tight should the side rod bar be? The bar with the ball on the end. It has the measurement in the manuals. Something like .22 or something. But how tight is that? Should the bar stick straight out when tightened or be able to flop around a little, having a little play? Does the locknut go in the middle? Any help? Thank you very much, TimsZ

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Haha! Some call me Obvious.

I believe you are supposed to tighten the side rod until it bottoms out. And then once the side rod has bottomed out against the end of the rack, then you should lock it in place with the lock nut. If you're lucky, the side rod will have a stiffy at that point. If it's still all loose and floppy hanging once the side rod has bottomed out, then it's worn beyond the recommended limit.

As for the order of the other two parts... Are they both threaded? I mean, obviously the lock nut (part with the flats) is threaded, but what about the other part? The part without the flats? I'm not even sure what that is. It's not in the manual pics...

Also, what year manual are you looking at that said something about .22? I looked and couldn't find that.

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I found this photo on the internet a while back. Can remember where, could have come from a fellow member on this site.

post-26512-14150827965647_thumb.jpg

It looks similar to what you are using. I think the big smooth ring also functions as the bumpstop for turn lock.

chas

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I think the big smooth ring also functions as the bumpstop for turn lock.

That's why I was asking if it was threaded. I was thinking the same thing.

My 77 280 has bump stops that aren't described in the manual either.

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post-18844-14150827966592_thumb.jpg The part on the far right in my first pic. has like a hard rubber where the threads should be. The threads are imbedded in the rubber somewhat. It's a 71 rack and pinion.

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Looking at your first pic, the inner section is recessed. I take it thats the rubber your describing.

The only thing I can think of, is that the outer metal ring section is there as an extra support to stop the rubber expanding outwards when it gets compressed in full lock. It could be a heavy duty version for rally service. That way it would stand up to the rigours of rally driving longer.

Does the metal ring strike the rack housing or does it fit over the end?

Next question: Was it recessed like that when it was new or is that wear due to years of being compressed?

If the recess is due to wear, should you file the ring down to the rubber height so it doesn't bind on the rack housing and render the rubber function useless?

I still have the original version thats welded for some strange reason. I had to repair one because it was loose Cutting the weld and tighten the lock nut further was the only way I could fix it. Wasn't tight enough from the factory when they welded it. I can not figure out why Datsun made it like this. The aftermarket stuff don't do it like this and they work fine.

I believe the way you have assembled your setup is correct. The ring must be the bump stop.

Chas

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"But you doesn't have to call me Johnson"

You can call me Ray.

BTW that was also the Gong Show "unknown comic"

Sorry couldn't let that blast from the past go without a remark

Back to the topic.

OOps I'm wrong, it was Bill Saluga.

Edited by mlc240z

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Timsz, Yup... That part without threads is an end of travel bump stop. So the order you've got the parts assembled in your pic is correct. Tighten up the end rod until it stops turning and is bottomed out on the end of the rack gear and then snug up the lock nut to keep it there. Then slide the bump stop(s) outboard until they are up against the inboard sides of the lock nuts.

So when you bottom out the end rod, does it sustain it's own weight, or is it floppy hanging even when fully tightened?

Funny that they never mentioned or pictured the bump stops in any of the manuals...

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post-18844-14150827971473_thumb.jpg Here's a pic of the far right nut on my first pic. The inside is a hard rubber material.

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Its the rubber bump stop. I would assemble it like you have in the photo in post #1. Adjust the ball joint like Captain said and tighten the lock nut. Then you can turn the bump stop by hand until it reaches the lock nut. I don't think the rubber will take much tension, so hand tight will be enough.

These bump stops look thicker than the ones I have and have seen. The ball joint section could be shorter to compensate for this. If not the bump stop could have an effect on the rack stroke 60.7mm which in turn will effect the turn radius a bit.

Chas

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And if you can't get that bump stop firmly against the back side of the lock nut, no big deal... It will be pushed into place the first time you steer to lock. The end of the rack will push it outboard.

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