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Your ideas/input requested for planning a garage

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Chris, yes it is officially a shed :) My wife and I debate this all the time. the plan is to put a garage on the house but I have to wait on that so the "shed" is a short term solution.

Mitchel, no idea about the floors yet. Any suggestions? Just focusing on the walls and ceiling. I still have to run wiring and insulate (6" studs so it will be warm. It has in-floor radiant pipes so I plan to put in an on-demand propane system but I have a vacuum tube solar water heater that will go nicely on the roof. It will work best with a tank so I may need to couple with the on-demand system. I am also going to look at a low voltage DC lighting system with solar panels charging the system. I'll also wire in conventional lighting too. Any input is welcome.

Thanks AJ I live in 'the woods" so it is easy to build amongst mature trees. The soil here has a lot of granite boulders due to the geology (in geek speak I am on the margin of the meguma group and the south mountain batholith) so we have to deal with these beasties. I still have to move the boulder that is up above the others and there is a big one just in behind the cluster that needs to be buried. The nice thing is that the photo is a "wife's eye view" so I can hide my cars behind the shed :) btw the door faces north so no hot summer heat like I had in my NJ apartment garage (btw did you get that plating issue sorted where we guessed it was from the NJ heat?).

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Hi Blue,

Some random ideas:

Lots of electrical outlets

Good sized air compressor

Lots of lighting

Overhead storage units which can be cranked up and down

Air exchanger

Cheers,

George

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You need to be on GarageJournal.com asking these questions! I've been on it for years and there are a TON of good guys, experts in every section and lotsa ideas.

Check out my thread there: E-tek's Projects

Best of luck with the shop!

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Mitchel, no idea about the floors yet. Any suggestions?
I do, but it depends on the kind of slab you got, do it have a lot of gravel ? big or small grains ? color of gravel ?

As for the insulation, i would advise you to put the vapor barrier on the studs, then add 2bys to the studs and fill in more insulation before dry wall it, that way you can pull all your wiring on the "hot" side of the vapor barrier, it's kinda hard for me to explain why in Enlgish, but it's all about not penetrating your vapor barrier and keeping it tight.

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I know it's poured, i'm not that dumb:classic: the thing is, do you need to cover it ?

The basement floor in the house i'm building is made with a mix of Sweedish granite in the concrete, grain size up to 5/8 inch, it is "sanded" down with a diamond sander, it will end up being as smooth as a babys butt and then polished with a special resin, the resin will be in the concrete and not on top of it, it will resist everything and if it get dull and scratched, just have it polished back up.

Cheaper than tiles and you can't beat the look, to my taste, this is how it look in the first stage.

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I used an epoxy floor finish in my floor ("color chips" I believe...). It will chip if abused but almost no chemicals will touch it. It looks a lot like the rustoleum kits but higher solids... Lots of outlets is good. I like the alternative energy approach where it makes financial sense...

Charles

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Yep I learned not to plate on high humid days in NJ or take it down to the basement. I had low contact this the sight over the last 1-1.5 years the site, I bought a house from the 50's with a garage almost perfect for a lift. TO make it perfect I need to switch to a sliding door over an overhead door so I can have 24' of lift height. I bet you can guess that I understand your discretion of the region by the user name.

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I love the HTC grinding. Not sure if I can find floor grinder here?

There must be other who make this grinding stuff, maybe you can even rent the maschine, my floor is not finished yet so i can't show you the result, the total price will be less than $30 per sq meter and i didn't touch a finger.

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Hi Blue:

+1 on visiting the GarageJournal.com site - spend a few hours there and you'll pick up a lot of very creative ideas. Also +1 on having a polished concrete floor. Many of the major Discount Stores and Grocery Stores around here are using this now - as well as some of the Drug Stores. I was going to recommend a Race Deck floor - I love mine - but I'm not sure how that would work with a heated floor. At any rate do something with the floor before you get much stuff in there..

On the vinyl chip floors - the most expensive, very best of them are excellent. I hear lots of problems with the less expensive, thinner vinyl chip layers etc types. Do a lot of research on that subject.

Enjoy the process...

Carl B.

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I did a lot of research looking for a high solids floor epoxy. It is very chemically resistant but if you slide something heavy like a tranny it will scratch it right off the concrete. I etched my concrete before the first coat. If you want to grind your floor Sunbelt rentals here in the US have floor grinders for rent. They offer the stones in carbide and diamond you have to buy the stones. The latter being way more expensive and faster.

C

Edited by Patcon

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I had to trench in a power cable to the garage from the house.

I used my gas powered pressure washer to cut a precise 3" wide X 18" deep trench. It was minimal work and mess. No crowbars or shovels were needed.... just a pick-axe with a broad blade.

We have mixed till soil here so large rocks are usually problems when digging holes. With the pressure washer, I just blasted around the rock on all sides and under then I could simply reach in a pick it out.

For initial cuts I used some pipe on the lawn to act as a straight line and guide. I used a 0 degree nozzle and made a few completely vertical cuts along each side of the pipe-guide to cut the sod and soften the soil with virtually no back spray or mud.

You can eventually stick the nozzle deeper in the ground to feel where you cut and the soil loosening.

I just kept passing over the line and the cuts went deeper. After ~ 6 inches of depth were loosened, I moved the guide and used a pick axe to lift and snap the small roots I came across near trees.

As mentioned above, the big rocks were easily tackled with the pressure washer and picked out.

The slurry of silt flowed and could easily be pulled out again with the broad blade of the pick axe.

Enjoy if you try this. BTW it was my boss's (wife) idea :)

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That's cool. Never tried that and have been doing a lot of trenching at work lately.

C

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