Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Gary in NJ

BP6ES v BPR6ES

Recommended Posts

I ordered the tune-up kit from MSA for my car. I expected (assumed?) to receive BPR6ES spark plugs with the kit, but got BP6ES plugs. Now I understand that the BP6ES are what are called for in the FSM, but I also like simple pleasures like static-free radio reception and clear cell phone communication.

I know all of the benefits of using resistor plugs. Are there disadvantages? Why in this modern age of electronics would I WANT to use a non-resistor plug in my car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From NGK

Q: When should I use a resistor spark plug?

A: NGK "R" or resistor spark plugs use a 5k ohm ceramic resistor in the spark plug to suppress ignition noise generated during sparking.

NGK strongly recommends using resistor spark plugs in any vehicle that uses on-board computer systems to monitor or control engine performance. This is because resistor spark plugs reduce electromagnetic interference with on-board electronics.

They are also recommended on any vehicle that has other on-board electronic systems such as engine-management computers, two-way radios, GPS systems, depth finders or whenever recommended by the manufacturer.

In fact, using a non-resistor plug in certain applications can actually cause the engine to suffer undesirable side effects such as an erratic idle, high-rpm misfire, engine run-on, power drop off at certain rpm levels and abnormal combustion.

So the answer is.......who knows. The only electronics you have is a stereo (assumed to be an aftermarket unit). Most of these have decent RF supression built these days. It's unlikely given the fact that you're using a coil and distributor (no ecm) that those plugs would have any detrimental effect on your L6. Only after installing them will you know if you get RF noise in your stereo speakers. The stock OEM plug will perform well in most circumstances. I understand that you've already paid for these so get them a go or ship them back for replacement. Go with the NGK IR plugs if you can budget them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most plug wires these days already have all the noise resistance you need. I use non-resistor in mine without issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, so what attributes do non-R plugs have that make them desirable for our old engines? Are they less resistant to fouling? Will they save the planet :)

Edited by Gary in NJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, they save the planet.;)

There is no difference in performance, only price, if that. As the article from NKG said, the resistored plugs are needed only for computer controlled cars. Ours, obviously, ain't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck, I'm happy if the place carries NGK plugs, period. AutoZone & Advance around here don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only electronics you have is a stereo (assumed to be an aftermarket unit).

And if it's not an aftermarket unit it's not even a stereo; the original Hitachi AM/FM mono radio in my '72 has three pushbuttons for AM preset stations and two more for the fancy new FM stations. The poor early 240Z guys had AM only.

What is remarkable to me, however, is that the radio actually has an integrated circuit, not just transistors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a related note. Any NGK"R" plug I have ever put into any running motor I have had to push home at some point. Everything from my ATV, my dirt and street bike, my snowmobiles, lawn mower, I have had to push home because of plug failure. They fail prematurely and I will NEVER put another R plug into anything I own. I'd put in a champion plug first! Now, a non NGK"R" plug, IF you can find them, are the best!

Edited by IdahoKidd
added "R" in original text

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've NEVER had an NGK plug fail me. But on the other hand, I have actually had to push my datsun out of an intersection because I made the very dumb mistake of using Bosch plugs. Never again, in ANY of my vehicles.

But to each his own.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just ordered a tune up kit for the 240Z from Motorsport too, but they sent me the resistor version on the NGK plugs. I've never had any problems with the NGK's, they always worked great for me.

I got plugs for the 280ZX as well. For some reason they came in that smaller socket size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heck, I'm happy if the place carries NGK plugs, period. AutoZone & Advance around here don't.

Must be different in this part of the country. I have no trouble getting NGK plugs at any of the local parts places. Advance, O'reily's, etc.

In fact when I replaced the plugs in my Chevy last year the only plugs Advance Auto had in stock for that vehicle were... NGK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The FSM for my 1978 Z says there are standard spark plugs and HOT plugs? What is the difference between them? Why use one over the other? They also mentioned cold plugs.....hmmmmmm whats up with them?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dunno... I use B6ES-11 in my '78 (per specs) and also use the NGK inductive wires. I used the same combo on my old '75, for a combined total of 15 years of daily driving. I never had any problems.

The most noise-critical component in both cars would have been the stereo. Yes, if I turn up the volume high enough on my current stereo, I can hear a tiny bit of noise, but only if I strain my ears. It's not at all objectionable. On my '75 (which had a cheaper, poor-student-variety stereo), I did have a bit of noise, but I simply installed a choke on the +12 wire, and the problem went away. Your ears will tell you whether there's a problem.

Our ECUs are quite primitive and are linear devices. They won't go crazy from electrical noise like the digital ones could.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On a related note. Any NGK"R" plug I have ever put into any running motor I have had to push home at some point. Everything from my ATV, my dirt and street bike, my snowmobiles, lawn mower, I have had to push home because of plug failure. They fail prematurely and I will NEVER put another R plug into anything I own. I'd put in a champion plug first! Now, a non NGK"R" plug, IF you can find them, are the best!

This is interesting, since I got the BPR6ES plugs for my 240. And it ran okay for 3 days, after that it began sputtering on acceleration. I took the plugs out and looked black sooted. I put back the B7ES plugs, and was running strong again. The B7ES also seems to color nice dark white in the middle, while the BPR6ES turns all sooted? Weird stuff...

I must admit, I'm not a fan of modern plugs in old cars..

The BPR6ES says made in france, the B7ES made in japan.. maybe it just hates France LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is interesting, since I got the BPR6ES plugs for my 240. And it ran okay for 3 days, after that it began sputtering on acceleration. I took the plugs out and looked black sooted. I put back the B7ES plugs, and was running strong again. The B7ES also seems to color nice dark white in the middle, while the BPR6ES turns all sooted? Weird stuff...

I must admit, I'm not a fan of modern plugs in old cars..

The BPR6ES says made in france, the B7ES made in japan.. maybe it just hates France LOL

The B7ES is a different heat range would attribute the difference of plug condition to this than country of origin!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Ive got the same questions...FSM says B6ES-11....NGK site says BR6ES-11 and advance parts says they are disc and wants to sell me BPR6ES-11....confusion for the rank amatuer.....thanks for the link to NGK that was educational

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience with my 71 was interesting. BP6ES always worked fine over decades. When I changed spark plug wires to copper I had massive radio static which I eliminated with Volkswagen Beetle spark plug boots, They screw into the wire and have a resister in them. This eliminated the static and I never had a problem with them and they didn't effect the performance in any way.

Good Luck

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The P in "BPR" means it has a projected tip. The ceramic tip is longer than non "p" plugs. If you are using NGK wires they also have noise suppression built in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tech Service Bulletin TS71-21 issued 3/30/71 changed the spark plug spec in L24s to BP6ES applicable to current production as well as earlier engines. Reason given was a wider heat range for plugs with projected tips.

The R added to the number indicates an internal resistor to suppress radio static. Not required if your high tension leads incorporate resistors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.