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guy_geo

NGK spark plug number

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BP6ES with a .040 gap.

They should be pregapped but I always double check mine. Couple times I had 1 or two not properly gapped. Doesn't take much for them to get bumped during shipping which can mess up the gap. Also I recommend a light coat of anti-seize on the threads.

Edited by DatsunZsRule

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I don't know about a '72, but the recommended gap for a '71 is only .032", not .040". In my experience, wider gap is not better, at least not for a 240Z.

Many NGK plugs have the gap that they preset as a suffix to the part number, in tenth of a millimeter. (1/10th mm = .004") So a BP6ES-8 has a .032" gap. a BPR6ES-11 is .044". If a plug doesn't have the suffix, assume it to be -8.

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I just got the info from the site linked below. I did get mine from them last time. I usually go through Nissan direct but at the time, they actually didn't have mine for my 280Z at the moment I needed them. I was happy with there service.

http://www.ngk.com/results_app.asp?AAIA=1209169

scroll down to "regular Class" plugs

Edited by DatsunZsRule

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My info came from my Nissan FSM. Calls for 0.8-0.9mm (.031-.035"). I'll trust Nissan before I trust the plug manufacturer.

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No, I agree Arne. I'm the same way. I don't have a FSM for a 240Z so i just listed the one NGK showed for it on there site which I shouldn't have done. That is the right plug though.

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I just picked up two sets of NGK BP6ES-11's today. They ran about $2 apiece at NAPA. They had to order them in.

And my FSM says the same as Arne's.

Edited by JonnyRock

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The wider gap is for the cars with electronic ignition. The correct plug number is BP6ES for a 240Z and 260Z (.031-.035) and B6ES for a 280Z (.039-.043). Those are both according to the FSM. Apparently the EFI cars don't need the 'P' (projected tip). The 'R' (resistor) is optional. Technically speaking, Jared, if you're running BP6ES with a .040 gap on a 280Z, you're using the wrong plugs with the wrong gap.

Edited by sblake01

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While on the subject of spark plugs, what would be your plug and gap recommendation for the following motor: L28 1mm over with Mn47 head (280Z valves, unshrouded, ported/polished, etc. and appr. 11.2:1 compression), .520 lift Rebello cam, and Electromotive direct ignition system. Thanks.

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I'd say start with somewhere .040-.045 range. The two distributorless vehicles I have owned were .042 (Chevy HHR) and .045 (Infiniti J30). Now I know that neither of those cars have a setup like yours but that shoud put you in the ballpark.

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BP6ES with a .040 gap.

They should be pregapped but I always double check mine. Couple times I had 1 or two not properly gapped. Doesn't take much for them to get bumped during shipping which can mess up the gap. Also I recommend a light coat of anti-seize on the threads.

You might want to rethink the anti-seize. The torque value in the FSM is assuming dry threads. Lubed threads will give a tighter joint for the same torque which causes higher stress on the threads and plug shell. It can also distort the spark plug shell, which can damage the ceramic insulator. Also it can change the heat transfer characteristics which effect the heat range.

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/tech_support/spark_plugs/installation/index.asp?mode=nml

Steve

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Don't be fooled by the hype. At best, the V-Power will last longer but that's about all. They don't perform any better.

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Technically speaking, Jared, if you're running BP6ES with a .040 gap on a 280Z, you're using the wrong plugs with the wrong gap.

What :confused: Who said I run those??? I use the factory recommended plugs for my 280Z which is B6ES-11

the BP6ES I listed for "guy_geo" for HIS 1972 240Z which is the correct plug for HIS Z.

doradox,

Thats your choice but I've been using a very light coat of anti-seize on the threads only of my plugs for yrs. on all my vehicles with no issues or problems what so ever. I've seen the type that don't believe in putting anything like a anti-seize lube on there threads and have damaged there threads trying to remove the plug and then they have a real expense on there hands so my opinion is You might want to rethink about not using the anti-seize but you can do whatever you want and I'll do the same which has served me well on all my vehicle tune ups over the yrs.

Edited by DatsunZsRule

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While on the subject of spark plugs, what would be your plug and gap recommendation for the following motor: L28 1mm over with Mn47 head (280Z valves, unshrouded, ported/polished, etc. and appr. 11.2:1 compression), .520 lift Rebello cam, and Electromotive direct ignition system. Thanks.

It doesn't look like anyone touched on the temperature of the plug. In your case with that much compression you'll be better off with something a bit cooler, most likely a BR7ES or BR8ES. I run the 8 with 11.9:1, .560lift cam, and an Electromotive ignition.

As stated in another post, "R" stands for resistor. The Electromotive ignition actually requires more resistance than a traditional setup, including higher resistance plug wires than the "ultra-low" stuff marketed nowadays, 1-2K ohms per foor IIRC.

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Thanks for your response, Philip. That was the type of insight I was looking for. I'll probably start with the BR7ES.

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doradox,

Thats your choice but I've been using a very light coat of anti-seize on the threads only of my plugs for yrs. on all my vehicles with no issues or problems what so ever. I've seen the type that don't believe in putting anything like a anti-seize lube on there threads and have damaged there threads trying to remove the plug and then they have a real expense on there hands so my opinion is You might want to rethink about not using the anti-seize but you can do whatever you want and I'll do the same which has served me well on all my vehicle tune ups over the yrs.

I think I'll side with the plug manufacturers and the vehicle OEMs on this one. Those damaged threads usually come from over torquing, dirty threads, or trying to remove plugs from a hot engine, and not from lack of lube. But if that's what you need to do who am I to say.

Steve

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What :confused: Who said I run those??? I use the factory recommended plugs for my 280Z which is B6ES-11

the BP6ES I listed for "guy_geo" for HIS 1972 240Z which is the correct plug for HIS Z.

doradox,

Thats your choice but I've been using a very light coat of anti-seize on the threads only of my plugs for yrs. on all my vehicles with no issues or problems what so ever. I've seen the type that don't believe in putting anything like a anti-seize lube on there threads and have damaged there threads trying to remove the plug and then they have a real expense on there hands so my opinion is You might want to rethink about not using the anti-seize but you can do whatever you want and I'll do the same which has served me well on all my vehicle tune ups over the yrs.

Well, I did say 'if'.;) As far as the anti-sieze, I don't do that but I do put a little turbine oil on the brush I use to clean the openings. Edited by sblake01

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I have been told to be very careful with anti-seize on spark plugs. The plugs need to have a good ground path to the head and anti-seize acts as an insulator. It can and will cause misfires. We had a Viper in our shop that was running like crap. Turned out to be anti-seize on the plugs. Once they were removed and everything was cleaned, the car ran very well.

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Well what can I say, it's one of those touchy subjects again where everyone has there own opinion about it. I should have known that and not even mentioned it for that reason. I am very careful with it and only put a very light coating of it on the threads. I don't disagree that if you go nuts with it that it can create issues but I know better than to do that. Like I've said I've been using just a very light coat of it on the threads for yrs. with no problems at all. None of my vehicles miss a beat when they are idling and driving so If it helps the threads and hasn't caused any issues for me then I plan to continue doing it the same way I have been. Just my two cents.

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I agree and do use it myself, I just go lightly and keep it off of the crush washer so there is a good ground path. I was just throwing it out there because too many people think more is better.

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NGK has this to say about anti-seize:

http://www.ngkplugpro.ca/content/contentfiles/pdf/NGKSP-0907-1R-Anti-SeizeonSparkPlugs.pdf

Note they suggest that one use torque ANGLE if using anti-seize on a non plated, i.e. not NGK, plug. This makes sense from an engineering standpoint as this takes thread friction out of the equation.

I tend to go with the engineers that design and test the product and give a reason based on sound engineering principles for following their suggestions.

Steve

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So, Jared, it would appear that you are the one that needs to do some re thinking. These plugs are actually designed to be used on aluminum heads w/o the use of anti sieze according to the people that make them. Do what you want but I'm afraid in this case you're wrong.

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I understand it's something that may not be needed on these plugs but at the same time, I don't believe a half a drop of anti seize wiped sparingly on the tip of the plug threads to help them thread in nice and help them remove nicer is going to cause the plugs to blow out. If you think that your nuts. Causing damage by over torquing plugs is caused NOT by using a tiny bit of lube on the threads but by the knucle head operating the wrench with no common sence who thinks he has to go ape $^!# with the wrench.

A tiny bit of lube for the threads is not going to hurt anything for god sake. I've never had damaged threads or ever broken a plug from using a tiny bit of ant-seize lube on the threads. If used correctly, it's not going to effect the way it runs either. If that were true then all my cars would run like $^!# which they don't. My Z and daily driver both run like a million bucks not to mention I haven't had a complaint from any customers I've done at work so I don't plan on changing the way I do it. My theory is if it's been working good for me through all the yrs. I've done it, I'll stick with it. Those of you that don't believe in it, Fine then dont use it then. Like I stated before if used correctly, It's really just a matter of opinion so lets just drop it. Life is too short to argue over such bullshit as this. If you feel the need to respond again thats fine but I've voiced my opinion on the subject here and now I'm done.

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