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Oiluj

Stubborn Rear Axle Nuts. Nuts!!

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I can't seem to remove the rear axle nuts to service the wheel bearings and install my rear disc brakes. I've read the archive posts and tried a few of the procedures without success.

Also, an impact wrench (suggested by a local Datsun mechanic), seems to have no effect...

I don't have brakes installed, so I can't engage the parking brake. With tires chocked and a 4' breaker bar, all that happens is that I rotate the tire. (not enough traction and the tire slips on the garage floor).

I'm thinking of removing the rear struts and put the drive flange in a bis a$$ vise to hold the assembly and work on it off the car.

DQOTD: Also, just to be sure, the nuts are right-hand thread, right?

Any helpful tips?

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I have a flat piece of bar stock that's about 4 feet long with holes drilled in it that fit over two of the lug nuts. I bolt it on on the opposite side from where I'm working and rotate it until it touches the ground in the opposite direction of the torque I'd be applying on the other side. It works! (as you can see, I've been through what you're going through and created my own tool)

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The 'tool' shown in the 1971 FSM is similar to what Stephen does. I didn't have to go to that extreme, mine came loose with the weight of the car on the ground, my son with his foot on the brakes, and me using a home-made 4 foot breaker bar (18" bar with a floor jack handle slipped on the end).

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Not trying to be a smart arse , but did you unpeen the nuts? If so I would take the tire off and use some bar like mentioned above. You can run a large crow bar in between the studs so the bar turns against the floor when you try to loosen the nut. PB Blaster is good stuff too.

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Misunderstood the post :stupid: I can say that there is a section in tech stuff on the Atlantic Z site - I used that when I was doing my bearings and it worked out well.

Edited by Sailor Bob

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......mine came loose with the weight of the car on the ground, my son with his foot on the brakes, and me using a home-made 4 foot breaker bar (18" bar with a floor jack handle slipped on the end).
Won't work, no brakes.
You can run a large crow bar in between the studs so the bar turns against the floor when you try to loosen the nut.
Could break a stud or two that way. My bar is drilled and the holes are chamfered so that the lug nuts bolt it securely to the studs.

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Not trying to be a smart arse , but did you unpeen the nuts?

Not a smart arse comment at all, but yes, I removed the peened sections. That's why it's so surprising that they won't break free.

Looks like they have never been serviced, so after 36 years, they just don't want to come apart... Will be making a reaction bar this weekend.

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I had a similar problem, but I had already removed the strut from the car! I solved it by using the wheel, rope-tied to an 8-foot 2x6 as shown here. Might work for you on the car too...

Mark

post-4028-14150804696216_thumb.jpg

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Made a 4' long reaction bar with some steel "U" channel. I used a 5' heavy pipe on my breaker bar as a "cheater" with a 27 mm impact socket to get more torque on the nuts.

The "stubborn" nut took an estimate 700 ft-lbs of torque to break free. The other only about 500. This week I'll make a plate to mount on the axle flange so I can attach a slide hammer for removal the axle.

Oh what fun!

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