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e_racer1999

Centerforce II new install slipping!

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Well, big thanks to Rex for coming over and helping me out and letting me borrow the tranny jack!

Anyway, here's the story. Tranny blew out, so I replaced the tranny with another 5 speed, replaced the clutch master and slave, replaced the clutch fork (just in case), replaced the clutch collar with the correct 280Z one, installed a freshly resurfaced flywheel (sprayed with brake parts cleaner to remove any grease), installed new throwout bearing, and installed the brand new centerforce II clutch/pressure plate.

Putting it back in was a bitch and a half, but I bled the clutch and got all the air bubbles out. Now to the meat of the post:

After replacing all of this, I was expecting epic grip. Instead, all I got was epic slip. What's up? Is this what I'm supposed to feel during Centerforce's 450-500 mile break in period, or did I get a bad clutch? I really hope it's standard break in because I purchased this from MSA 2 years ago (well past the 90 day guarantee).

Jason

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Do you have any free play at the pedal or the slave-to-fork interface? Which slave did you use, early or late? Does the slave match the fork?

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Sounds like you need to adjust the clutch pedal and slave cylinder. Let me know and I'll post the instructions for an early 240Z if it'll help. You can find it in the FSM I'm sure but my input will come from a Haynes manual...

Tom.

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i'll give that a shot tomorrow when i get home from work. With a new slave cylinder, should the adjustment nut be all the way out? It was like that when I took it out of the box, but I had to bring it back in to get it to connect with the fork.

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i'll give that a shot tomorrow when i get home from work. With a new slave cylinder, should the adjustment nut be all the way out? It was like that when I took it out of the box, but I had to bring it back in to get it to connect with the fork.

You should have maybe 1/4" or 3/8" from the retracted position till the ball hits the fork. If you have no freeplay then the pressure plate is always being pushed on. You also need free play between the pedal and the master. Maybe 1/8" to 3/16" there. You can also use the slave adjustment to get the engagement to a comfortable height. If the adjustment were too far out the clutch would disengage right at the top of the pedal travel (assuming everything else were fairly close).

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Included below are the instructions for proper adjustment of the clutch slave cylinder and the clutch pedal with figures included... Hope this helps!

Clutch adjustment (early 240Z models):

1. Detach the return spring from the clutch slave cylinder.

2. Loosen the locknut on the pushrod and then turn the adjusting nut until any movement in the withdrawal lever is just removed.

3. Back off the adjusting nut 1.5 turns and then tighten the locknut and reconnect the return spring.

4. When this adjustment is correctly carried out, a clearance between the face of the release bearing and the fingers of the diaphragm spring will be provided of 0.79 inches and a free movement at the clutch pedal of 0.39 to 0.59 inches.

IMGP1211.jpg

Clutch pedal adjustment (240Z Models):

1. Set the upper surface of the pedal pad 8.0 inches from the metal surface of the "toe board". Do this by adjusting the length of the master cylinder pushrod. The free movement at the pedal should be between 0.39 and 0.59 inches, otherwise adjust the slave cylinder pushrod as described in the previous section.

IMGP1210.jpg

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You can play around with the slave to adjust that closer to where you want it. So long as you still have free play you should be fine.

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well, it will be a little while. After finally getting the clutch where i want it and finally getting the speedo working my engine blew. So now the tear down commences! Sounds like a broken rod :(

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Ooooohhhhhh Noooooo! I'm so sorry.... Make the best of it though, I'm sure you'll learn a lot.

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well, it will be a little while. After finally getting the clutch where i want it and finally getting the speedo working my engine blew. So now the tear down commences! Sounds like a broken rod :(

Bummer Jason, If it isn't one thing it's...

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brilliant! that worked. thanks guys... now i just have to get used to the clutch engaging just off the floor

You have three adjustments, slave, pedal stop, and pedal to MC. Adjust the pedal to MC and pedal stop a bit and that should help considerably.

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How about the "non-adjusting" slave ? Is it truelly non-adjusting? Would the only adjustment then be the free play at the pedal? Thanks

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only the very early slaves are adjustable with the locking nut...all the rest are non-adjustable and simply have a spring in them that adjusts it automatically.

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only the very early slaves are adjustable with the locking nut...all the rest are non-adjustable and simply have a spring in them that adjusts it automatically.

This is not correct. There is no spring in the non-adjustable slave. If you have an adjustable slave and cannot buy a replacement, the solution is to take the adjustable pin out of your old slave and replace the non adjustable pin on the new slave. The only difference between the slaves is the pin.

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This is not correct. There is no spring in the non-adjustable slave. If you have an adjustable slave and cannot buy a replacement, the solution is to take the adjustable pin out of your old slave and replace the non adjustable pin on the new slave. The only difference between the slaves is the pin.

and the hole on the early slave casting to hook the exterior spring.

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Right. It looks like the ones with the holes are NLA.

Easy enough to drill a hole like Mat did:

As far as I can tell, the unsprung length of the SC spring is around 3 1/2 inches(out-to-out), and the diameter is about 1/2-5/8. I had to drill a pilot hole in the casing of the SC because this VB part didn't have a way to attach the spring.

From this thread: http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20751

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<This is not correct>

What are you talking about jmortensen? Because of the spring, that's why it isn't manually adjustable; it has a spring in it that always keeps it adjusted automatically. That's how they changed the slave from the early one that you have to adjust all the time manually...

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What are you talking about jmortensen? Because of the spring, that's why it isn't manually adjustable; it has a spring in it that always keeps it adjusted automatically. That's how they changed the slave from the early one that you have to adjust all the time manually...

Go pull one apart and post a picture of the spring. I double dog dare you! ROFL

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This is not correct. There is no spring in the non-adjustable slave. If you have an adjustable slave and cannot buy a replacement, the solution is to take the adjustable pin out of your old slave and replace the non adjustable pin on the new slave. The only difference between the slaves is the pin.

Jon, I have 3 non-adjustable (the automatically adjusting) slave cylinders in my workbench drawer that have an internal spring. The spring is around 2 inches long and tapers. The smallest end of the spring attaches to the slave cylinder piston. The largest end of the spring seats against a the back of the slave cylinder. I no longer have the pistons because I kept breaking the seal due to my ACT pressure plate issue (I kept overextending the slave piston). I can take a picture of the spring though.

Edited by ktm

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Alright, I think I'm wrong on this one. A light spring inside would keep some tension on the pin and allow the pin to follow the throwout fork as the clutch wears. I was thinking a retracting spring. That wouldn't work at all.

Sorry for the hassle. Thanks for teaching me something new Dave and Bo.

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