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senkyoshi

hatch weatherstripping question

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I bought the hatch WeatherStripping from MSA (Precision) a while back and finally have some time this weekend to put it on. I just finished stripping off the old stripping (that was a pain!) and am ready to put the new stuff on. I can easily see how the outer stripping goes on but the inner stripping is confusing. One side of the stripping opens like a flap and the other side is closed. Can someone please describe to me how this goes on? Pictures or drawings would help because I am a visual learner.

Also, how much weatherstripping glue-stuff should I put on? A dab once in a while or a continuous thin line?

Thanks for your help!

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Dude-

You gotta get a copy of the book " "How to restore Your Z Car" by Wick Humble. It explains so many of those little things like you're wondering. Even though the project car is a 240Z, most of the body stuff is the same through 1978. I just did the top-front and window frame weatherstrip pieces on my doors.

BTW- I had mine rebound with the coiled wire after the spine dried up & fell apart. Now I can open the pages flat and see the pages better. What's it take to get permission to Digitize the book to make a PDF file?

Question:

Is BLACK weatherstrip adhesive more appropriate, or will the TAN stuff be OK?

thx

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Thanks TomoHawk, I am looking into getting the book you mentioned. Any help anybody can give me right now while I am waiting for the book to get here? I want to get this done this weekend while I have some time off from work. Thanks for your help.

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I bought the hatch WeatherStripping from MSA (Precision) a while back and finally have some time this weekend to put it on. I just finished stripping off the old stripping (that was a pain!) and am ready to put the new stuff on. I can easily see how the outer stripping goes on but the inner stripping is confusing. One side of the stripping opens like a flap and the other side is closed. Can someone please describe to me how this goes on? Pictures or drawings would help because I am a visual learner.

Also, how much weatherstripping glue-stuff should I put on? A dab once in a while or a continuous thin line?

Thanks for your help!

I'll give it a shot, but your description leaves doubt as to whether you're referring to the weatherstrip piece that goes on the outermost edge and therefore around the lip of the hatch to seal the drainage space around the hatch opening or to the true inner weatherstrip which seals the cabin.

The outer weatherstrip originally came in 3 pieces; the 2 sides were identical and in cross section looked like a question mark (without the period) and with 90° angles instead of curves. Those mount with the flat portion on the upper gutter floor with the "cap" (the "u" shaped part) mounting on the flange coming up from the gutter. The third part or INNER part of that weatherstrip, had a rubber tube mounted to the top of that "u" shaped cap, otherwise it was identical to the side pieces. It sometimes proves easier to remove the hatch to get it mounted properly.

Mounting the side pieces is pretty much obvious and straight forward. The center piece gets really tricky in getting it to mount to the flange above and in front of the hinges.

The true inner weatherstrip fits onto the inner flange and it should have been somewhat pre-formed so that mounting it "inside-out" (i.e. outer edge towards the inside of the opening) would be tricky if at all possible.

But...it mounts with the fleshy part of the gasket towards the outside.

As far as adhesive, if you're using 3M's Weatherstrip Adhesive (Black or Yellow are both the same except for color), I'd recommend the black if only to hide whatever might seep out. Now, apply a thin bead to the inner part of the gasket after making sure you've removed whatever mold release powder may be left inside there. Spread it evenly and just be careful not to splooge it everywhere. Then while that one is setting, apply a bead to the inside edge of the gutter...NOT the inside SIDE of the gutter but the inner part of the "u" that is the gutter, with one side being the flange of metal and the other the car body. This keeps any "oops" overflow to the gutter and not to the interior of the car (for the inner) and to the gutter instead of the larger surround around the hatch opening.

By the time you've done both sides, then take the weatherstrip and gently spread it so that you can see the sides of the glue area. Position it carefully (You DID remember to trial fit and mark where the center / edge is supposed to go didn't you?) then start working your way from one end to the other.

Weatherstrip adhesive is a contact cement, and as long as you don't wait too long between applying it to both surfaces and joining them, this will work fine. If on the other hand, you find that you took a little too long, simply add a thin bead between the surfaces. It doesn't achieve it's final grip until 24 hours later, so you do have some work time....but NOT hours. That is, if you apply the weatherstrip and you find that you put it on wrong, remove it right away, clean up the mess and start over. If you wait till tomorrow....it's on there for good and you'll only succeed in tearing the weatherstrip.

Hope this helps.

Enrique

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I'm going to give a nod here to Ollie at Z Specialties (www.zspecialties.com). I purchased my weatherstrip kit from him, and he includes the following instructions for Inner Hatch Gasket installation:

Remove the rear hatch. DO NOT REMOVE THE HINGES FROM THE BODY. Undo the 4 Phillips screws that hold the hatch to the hinges. In many cases you'll need to use an impact driver to remove them. After removing the hatch you should raise the hinge up and put a crumpled paper towel under each one to keep it up in the air and out of the way. Remove all the old gaskets and glue. Sterilize the new gasket, and gasket surface, with lacquer thinner, enamel reducer, acetone, or ketone works too. Position the gasket, making sure you have it mated to its respective corners. Note that the upper corners are a sharper radius than the lowers.

Read the instructions on the glue tube and follow them. We recommend using 3M black weather-strip adhesive. Don't be stingy on how much glue you use, especially along the top where the body isn't completely smooth.

If you have any rust or exposed metal on any of these surfaces, you MUST treat and seal the metal before doing this job.

Glue all 4 corners to the body first. The gasket will look oversized, so grab the approximate middle of each section and apply and glue about 8 to 10 inches of it. Once you've glued all 4 middle sections, then you can proceed to glue the remaining sections one at a time. You will need to cut a small section out of the gasket with a razor blade to clear the rear hatch shock or shocks, depending on your year. Each time you apply the glued gasket to the body, press it down firmly, making sure that it sticks.

A little extra glue may force its way out from under the gasket, but just clean it up with a shop rag dampened with cleaning agent as you go. Don't wait for the glue to harden, it will be much harder to clean up.

After the gasket has been installed and has set for at least an hour, go back and lightly try to lift up the outer edges to make sure the glue has adhered to both parts.

If there are weak spots, squirt some extra glue in there, press it down, then lightly lift itup until it has tacked off. Press it down firmly and clean up any residue.

Do not install the rear hatch until at least 24 hours have passed, and you're 100% sure that the gasket is completely and properly glued down. The hatch is going to shut a little hard for the first 6 months, or until the gasket has had a chance to break itself in. It doesn't hurt to coat your hatch and door gaskets with Sil-glyde after they have been properly installed and cured. That will make the doors and hatch close easier, and last longer.

All gaskets that are glued on must be done at temperatures above 55 degrees and they must be kept above that during the curing process. Curing takes 24 hours. - Z man (Oliver Naugle)

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