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Eiji, Thanks. I personally called them (i have no affiliation) and they were able to make a match with my engine number to an R30 Nissan Skyline. Is that a shared engine with the 280z? I am very amateur at this stuff... so please forgive my ignorance.

sblake01: First verify if a new user is for real before you call them a SPYBOT.

Edited by jirospy
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In South Africa , there been build localy homlogation specials from different manufacturers , for example BMW build a 7 series with a with a 24 valve 6 cil M5/6 engine , Chevrolet build on a Vauxhall Firenza a V8 302ci car called a Chevy CanAm , Alfa Romeo build a GTV 6 3.0l engine , All these cars a 100 each , where localy build as homolgation specials for South Africa , Is it possible Nissan did the same with the Skyline ?

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I personally called them (i have no affiliation) and they were able to make a match with my engine number to an R30 Nissan Skyline.
I didn't notice this statement before. You're saying that you called Parts Train and someone threre was able to, by using the engine number, match it up to a particular vehicle type? I'm afraid the flag will have to come out on that one: 27ww45g.gif
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I didn't notice this statement before. You're saying that you called Parts Train and someone threre was able to, by using the engine number, match it up to a particular vehicle type? I'm afraid the flag will have to come out on that one: 27ww45g.gif

sblake01: Since you have so much time on your hands reading my old posts and re-evaluating your immediate dismissal by erroneously thinking I am a "SPYBOT" and today come back with additional useless and offensive language ... it would be best that you put your energy into calling that parts company to verify my comment rather than continue posting negative comments in this forum. Also, thanks for such a warm welcome into this forum.

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I told you why said what I said and you (apparently) were okay with the explaination (post #29-30). I'm also telling you that somewhere in your communication with Parts Train, you've been misinformed. Why would you take that as a knock against you rather than against Parts Train? As far as a need for me to call them? I've spoken to them in the past and personally, I wouldn't use them to verify anything based on my experiences with them. Oh, and warm welcomes are my specailty.:kiss: But, seriously, ease up and quit taking it personally, it's the internet.:beer:

Edited by sblake01
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I just purchased a 1971 240z (12/70) fitted with a 2.8L Nissan engine number L28R902644X. The database at partstrain.com says my engine comes from a Nissan Skyline R30.

Can you take a photo of your engine number pad, and post it here? I'm interested to see it, as I've never seen one before. Also interested to see the oil pan / sump position ( front sump, or rear sump ) and the oil dipstick position in the block.

But I don't see how your engine number could have been identified as having come from an R30 Skyline. What system would be used to track such things from the engine number? L28-engined R30-series Skylines are fairly rare beasts, too........

Engine blocks with "R" and "X" stamped on the engine block # area are factory rebuilt bare engines, sold by Nissan parts department as replacement engines, rather than engines that were used in certain model/market/spec cars.

I know this for sure because I have two factory remanufacturerd engines stamped this way. Nothing special otherwise, no "racing" bullshit or anything like that. I would guess that the "R" means "Remanufactured" or Rebuilt or mayeven be Recalled (?) or something of that nature.

Makes sense to me. The 'R' could then be stamped in the gap between the 'L28' stamping and the block serial number at time of Remanufacture, and the 'X' on the end would preclude anyone from changing the number by adding to it ( same as Nissan did with body serial numbers in certain markets, to conform with local regulations ).

Cheers,

Alan T.

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Also interested to see the oil pan / sump position ( front sump, or rear sump ) and the oil dipstick position in the block.
Good call, Alan. I missed that one. The sedan motors would be front sump and the S30 motors would be rear with the dipstick in the corresponding position. I should have reacalled that having owned both.
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I will try and post photos as soon I get it back from the shop... if you notice, I have cropped my avatar to remove the flat bed tow truck it was sitting upon due to some electrical issue (maybe starter solenoid?) that caused the fusible link to overheat/white smoke and break. Once I get my car back, I will be happy to take photos and post.

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  • 4 weeks later...
I will try and post photos as soon I get it back from the shop... if you notice, I have cropped my avatar to remove the flat bed tow truck it was sitting upon due to some electrical issue (maybe starter solenoid?) that caused the fusible link to overheat/white smoke and break. Once I get my car back, I will be happy to take photos and post.

As promised Alan, see photos for engine number and oil pan position.

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post-23632-14150814249098_thumb.jpg

post-23632-14150814249557_thumb.jpg

Edited by jirospy
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As promised Alan, see photos for engine number and oil pan position.

Thanks for taking the time to do that.

Now that it's installed in your S30 body, it would of course have to have been converted to rear sump if it was originally front sump, so nothing conclusive there. I'd expect to see the original front sump dipstick hole plugged and the rear sump dipstick boss casting drilled to suit the rear sump position.

I still don't see how it can have been linked to an R30 Skyline just by its engine number though.....

Cheers,

Alan T.

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Thanks for taking the time to do that.

Now that it's installed in your S30 body, it would of course have to have been converted to rear sump if it was originally front sump, so nothing conclusive there. I'd expect to see the original front sump dipstick hole plugged and the rear sump dipstick boss casting drilled to suit the rear sump position.

I still don't see how it can have been linked to an R30 Skyline just by its engine number though.....

Cheers,

Alan T.

Hi Alan,

Again, I am new to Z Cars and do not claim to be an expert whatsoever.

I was told by a parts company (name listed above) while inquiring about a starter that my engine number matched with an R30 Skyline. That is all I can tell you about this...

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Yes, that's the thing I find most puzzling. I don't know what system, what data would link a remanufactured engine number with a particular model. Plenty of other models used the L28 engine block in both front and rear sump applications.

Has your block got a front sump dipstick boss that has been plugged?

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Perhaps timing is the key? If the R30 was the last hurrah for the L28 in a production Nissan, the reference used may be simplistic and simply link the L28 part of the engine No. to the last use of this identifier, with the last vehicle series to receive an engine No. beginning with L28? Particularly if the block in question was sold/supplied sone years after production ceased. Some parts publications seen to trim information to the basics as years go by so maybe in the interests of print space they simply refer to the last known model?

Just a (convoluted) thought!LOL

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