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Z - 35 Years of Nissan's Sports Car

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Did you possibly consider that it was the truth and the car simply needed some work to get them where they got? I mean, they didn't do so bad and made the Z a pretty famous part of racing history.

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why all of the sudden is there so much tension between people on this site? im gettin tired of it already. :sleepy:

You'll get that anywhere. Anytime you get a bunch of guys who think they know everything. :D

I do believe people around here need to take things a little less seriously.

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I was on hand for the interview section with John Morton and Trevor Harris when they were interviewed regarding the early days of the the BRE 240Z for the show TV show Full Throttle, and I think that some of you are missing the picture.

At first John was not impressed with the car and that was just from a RACING perspective. I think they felt that it would be difficult to get it to perform against porsches which at the time, in stock trim, were more developed for racing...Needless to say, John is very proud of the fact that they went from underdogs to the overdog in a short period of time.

Remember John had been racing Datsun Roadsters up to this point and the Z was a completely new animal. Fortunately, the BRE team figured out how to make the car handle. Changing pickup points for the front suspension and modifing numerous parts of the car started a legacy of Datsun Nissan racing that is second to none.

John is an incredible tallent and the fans of Datsuns and Nissans should be greatful that we had such a tallented driver runing these cars otherwise they could have fallen by the wayside like the Yugo.

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I'm not offended in any way by what Morton wrote. Nissan designed and built the car to ride better than you might think a sports car would. Didn't the first one end up a racer with BRE or Bob Sharp because a model sat on the hood or the roof and bent it? That would be more damning in my book than building a car that had a soft ride, especially when the competition was like riding in an oxcart.

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Zeds cleaned up all the major placings in the East African Safari. :classic:

Zeds blitzed the field in the Monte Carlo Rally. :classic:

Zeds proved themselves in Australia's Southern Cross Rally. :classic:

HMMM,

Is it at all possible that the cars were specially set up for racing ?. :surprised

I wonder if the DRIVERS had anything to do with the Zeds success. :finger:

Rick.

:devious: :devious:

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My copy arrived yesterday. Couple of points for now and I plan to write this weekend about a number of things. I have been waiting to see this book, as some of you know, and I want a little more time to digest the contents. I feel very, very naive at the moment.

The book is available at MSA, Amazon.com, and a number of different motorsport book dealers. I bought mine on the cheap from Amazon - $32 delivered.

The quote that started this thread is somewhat taken out of context. I concur with Mike's post; perhaps this is actually the way the original car really was.

The Porsches you guys are referring to was the 914, not the 911. The 914 raced in the same class as the original 240Z, not the 911.

Chris

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Bryan, do you have this book or its previous version? If you don't then you should. It will SHOW you what it took to make a Z handle. And unfortunately it makes light of the fact the original stock Z did NOT handle very well.

Chris A.

post-5906-14150796231248_thumb.jpg

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1Bravo 6, dont you think it takes a combination of a good car and tallent to race and win?....I can assure you it is not just the car alone, otherwise it would drive itself :)

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Yes, of course I have the book. Maybe I took it all wrong, but to compare it to American car handling is outrageous. I'm not a racer, but I know how American cars of that era handled, they are not Z's.

Now I wish I had never started this thread!!! Maybe everyone could just leave it, or maybe I can get Mike to lock it. I dared to question the Morton, so I'm raked over the coals. Sorrrrrryy! :tapemouth

If you want to race $6K Porsche 911's you don't go buy a $3500 240Z.

Nuff said.

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Ummmm,

Yes Ron, That's just what I was trying to point out mate.

I guess I was just abit too tongue in cheek and :devious: that time.

Rick.

:devious: :devious:

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I'd like a copy of this book too :) I'm interested in what they changed to make the car handle better. :)

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I'm about 2/3's complete with the book. I suggest back to the original post of this thread that the author read the book before making the initial remark, however I understand the remark. Ironic it seems that John Morton would make the comment in the forward and then go on to say later in the book that his car was initially prepared and raced successfully in a very stock configuration.

The author of the book, Pete Evanow, was with Nissan North America in an executive management position for a number of years. His writing style is somewhat informal which accents his intentions outlined in his 'forward', stating that he wanted to contribute his "insider's" comments to the history of the Z car within the context of Nissan Motor Corporation. His "corporatespeak" is most reminiscent of the type of conversation one might have over a few beers at a Z gathering; informal and conversational.

Pete managed the Z-Store program which is why I was particularly interested in what he had to say. As many of you recall, I embarked on a research program about the Vintage Zs several months ago after sharp discussions on this site about the "factory" restored Zs. This book was published last August just as I was about to seek help with publishing my work. I put everything on hold until I read his book.

There are quite a number of young new American members on this site and to them I would suggest reading the book. There is quite a bit of American racing heritage discussed; many great pictures and memorabilia about the history of the Z car in the United States. And, an insider's view of the events surrounding the history of Nissan North America. It is an American book about the American chapters of Z car history. I suggest one not lose sight of the fact that the Z car is Japanese and that although the American history is a large portion of the success story, it is not the complete, world-wide story.

Chris

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Chris,

Your comments as usual were spot on with regard to the book. I too am just about two thirds of the way through this book and the only disturbing aspect for the money spent involves some of the editing. There are a few picture captions for example on page 54 the photo depicts a blue and silver 2+2 with t-tops (available for the 2+2 beginning in 1981) and states that "this is the 1979 280ZX 2+2 version." Another photo on page 123 needs better clarification. The caption explains the low production numbers for both the Fairlday 432 and 432-R yet, the red car in the picture has later 260Z/280Z taillights, later style sail panel "Z" badges, rear repeater lenses and such.

I know I will be flamed for this but, Carl Beck is sighted as being a provider for the most accurate information with regard to Z cars? Just look through some of the threads on this website and ask yourself that question.

Getting back to the John Morton commentary, on page 37 Morton states that the "240Z was in the top three in terms of most fun to drive"; having said that I still trust most anything he would have to say with regard to Nissan products past and present.

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